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Wrong Don Burge?

Don Burge

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Background Information

Affiliations

Utah Museums Association Inc

Board Member


San Juan Foundation

Member of Board of Trustees


Moab District BLM Advisory Council for

Secretary of the Interior


Education

BYU


University of Arizona


physical geology


pre-med

University of Southern California


Master's degree

mineralogy


honorary degree

College of Eastern Utah


Web References(135 Total References)


Reprint from the College of Eastern Utah Prehistoric Museum

biography.allanmccollum.net [cached]

Thirty years ago, a young CEU geologist named Don Burge, freshly transplanted in Carbon County from southern California, told the students in his adult evening Physical Geology class, "You know, you people are crazy!
You live in a geologic paradise here in eastern Utah. These geologic formations are all exposed, as an open book, by erosion for you to see. Burge didn't know, however, that his comments would start a series of events, eventually resulting in one Utah's most impressive museums. CEU, according to Burge, has significant opportunities to develop a curriculum based on the Museum. In addition to courses in artifact preservation and management of the facility, he envisions the Museum as a base for geological and archaeological research on the Colorado Plateau. Then we realized that we had nothing to display the stuff in," Burge explained. During the three decades that have passed, the Museum has become an increasingly important facility for the preservation and documentation of eastern Utah's unique geological and archaeological remains, primarily because of the dedicated staff and volunteers, according to Burge. "All that we have accomplished has happened because of the enthusiasm and determination of a lot of individuals. We have always been dependant on the generosity of others because there's never been sufficient funding for the Museum's operations. It's truly been a community effort that we can all be proud of." Although funding continues to be tight, Burge is optimistic sources will be found for the Museum's continued development. "You never know what can happen," he says.


shapes.allanmccollum.net

Thirty years ago, a young CEU geologist named Don Burge, freshly transplanted in Carbon County from southern California, told the students in his adult evening Physical Geology class, "You know, you people are crazy!
You live in a geologic paradise here in eastern Utah. These geologic formations are all exposed, as an open book, by erosion for you to see. Burge didn't know, however, that his comments would start a series of events, eventually resulting in one Utah's most impressive museums. CEU, according to Burge, has significant opportunities to develop a curriculum based on the Museum. In addition to courses in artifact preservation and management of the facility, he envisions the Museum as a base for geological and archaeological research on the Colorado Plateau. Then we realized that we had nothing to display the stuff in," Burge explained. During the three decades that have passed, the Museum has become an increasingly important facility for the preservation and documentation of eastern Utah's unique geological and archaeological remains, primarily because of the dedicated staff and volunteers, according to Burge. "All that we have accomplished has happened because of the enthusiasm and determination of a lot of individuals. We have always been dependant on the generosity of others because there's never been sufficient funding for the Museum's operations. It's truly been a community effort that we can all be proud of." Although funding continues to be tight, Burge is optimistic sources will be found for the Museum's continued development. "You never know what can happen," he says.


recentprojects.allanmccollum.net

Thirty years ago, a young CEU geologist named Don Burge, freshly transplanted in Carbon County from southern California, told the students in his adult evening Physical Geology class, "You know, you people are crazy!
You live in a geologic paradise here in eastern Utah. These geologic formations are all exposed, as an open book, by erosion for you to see. Burge didn't know, however, that his comments would start a series of events, eventually resulting in one Utah's most impressive museums. CEU, according to Burge, has significant opportunities to develop a curriculum based on the Museum. In addition to courses in artifact preservation and management of the facility, he envisions the Museum as a base for geological and archaeological research on the Colorado Plateau. Then we realized that we had nothing to display the stuff in," Burge explained. During the three decades that have passed, the Museum has become an increasingly important facility for the preservation and documentation of eastern Utah's unique geological and archaeological remains, primarily because of the dedicated staff and volunteers, according to Burge. "All that we have accomplished has happened because of the enthusiasm and determination of a lot of individuals. We have always been dependant on the generosity of others because there's never been sufficient funding for the Museum's operations. It's truly been a community effort that we can all be proud of." Although funding continues to be tight, Burge is optimistic sources will be found for the Museum's continued development. "You never know what can happen," he says.


www.sunad.com

The mammoth was found on United States Forest Service land and the Forest Service had written a proposal for acceptance and care of the bones that Don Burge, curator and director of the CEU Museum, said was worded so that only three facilities in the state could accept them.


biz.sunad.com

The mammoth was found on United States Forest Service land and the Forest Service had written a proposal for acceptance and care of the bones that Don Burge, curator and director of the CEU Museum, said was worded so that only three facilities in the state could accept them.


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