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Wrong Don Buchla?

Don Buchla

Technical Director

California Institute of the Arts

HQ Phone:  (661) 255-1050

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

California Institute of the Arts

24700 McBean Parkway

Valencia, California,91355

United States

Company Description

Ranked as America's top college for students in the arts by Newsweek/The Daily Beast, California Institute of the Arts (CalArts) has set the pace for educating professional artists since 1970. Offering rigorous undergraduate and graduate degree programs throug...more

Web References(115 Total References)


BEAM: About : Advisors

www.beamfoundation.org [cached]

Don Buchla is widely regarded as one of the major pioneers in electronic musical instruments; Don constructed the first voltage-controlled synthesizer in 1964.
Since then, he has produced a variety of conceptually and technically advanced instruments, many of which are in use in university and private studios around the world. He has consulted for several instrument manufacturers, including CBS, Kimball Piano, Zeta Music, Yamaha International, Gibson Guitars, and E-Mu Systems. He has served as technical director of California Institute of the Arts, technical director of the Electric Symphony, co-director of the Artists' Research Collective. on has received grants from the Veterans' Administration (guidance devices for the blind), the Guggenheim Foundation (music languages), and the National Endowment for the Arts (composition). He recently received the prestigious 2002 SEAMUSLifetime Achievement Award "in recognition of his pioneering achievements and lifetime contribution to the art and craft of electro-acoustic music". Hundreds of his unique instruments continue to be in use and vintage Buchla synthesizers continue to be in strong demand. Don received a degree from UC Berkeley in Physics in 1960, and holds several patents in the fields of optics and musical instruments.


BEAM: About : Advisors

www.beamfoundation.org [cached]

Don Buchla is widely regarded as one of the major pioneers in electronic musical instruments; Don constructed the first voltage-controlled synthesizer in 1964.
Since then, he has produced a variety of conceptually and technically advanced instruments, many of which are in use in university and private studios around the world. He has consulted for several instrument manufacturers, including CBS, Kimball Piano, Zeta Music, Yamaha International, Gibson Guitars, and E-Mu Systems. He has served as technical director of California Institute of the Arts, technical director of the Electric Symphony, co-director of the Artists' Research Collective. on has received grants from the Veterans' Administration (guidance devices for the blind), the Guggenheim Foundation (music languages), and the National Endowment for the Arts (composition). He recently received the prestigious 2002 SEAMUSLifetime Achievement Award "in recognition of his pioneering achievements and lifetime contribution to the art and craft of electro-acoustic music". Hundreds of his unique instruments continue to be in use and vintage Buchla synthesizers continue to be in strong demand. Don received a degree from UC Berkeley in Physics in 1960, and holds several patents in the fields of optics and musical instruments.


beamfoundation.org

Don Buchla is widely regarded as one of the major pioneers in electronic musical instruments; Don constructed the first voltage-controlled synthesizer in 1964.Since then, he has produced a variety of conceptually and technically advanced instruments, many of which are in use in university and private studios around the world.He has consulted for several instrument manufacturers, including CBS, Kimball Piano, Zeta Music, Yamaha International, Gibson Guitars, and E-Mu Systems.He has served as technical director of California Institute of the Arts, technical director of the Electric Symphony, co-director of the Artists' Research Collective.Don has received grants from the Veterans' Administration (guidance devices for the blind), the Guggenheim Foundation (music languages), and the National Endowment for the Arts (composition).He recently received the prestigious 2002 SEAMUSLifetime Achievement Award "in recognition of his pioneering achievements and lifetime contribution to the art and craft of electro-acoustic music".Hundreds of his unique instruments continue to be in use and vintage Buchla synthesizers continue to be in strong demand.Don received a degree from UC Berkeley in Physics in 1960, and holds several patents in the fields of optics and musical instruments.


Don Buchla - San Francisco Electronic Music Festival

www.sfemf.org [cached]

Alessandro Cortini with Don Buchla
Don Buchla Educated in physics, physiology, music, and astronomy, Don Buchla's multi-faceted creativity has been applied to fields as diverse as space biophysics research, musical instrument design, and multi-media composition. Much of his work has centered on the refinement of communication channels between man and machine, notably the invention of mobility aids for the visually handicapped, the development of instrumentation for bio-feedback and physiological telemetry, and the design of interactive electronic musical instruments and performance-oriented music languages. Don founded the alternative band, Fried Suck, was a founding member of the 15 piece Arch Ensemble, and co-founded the Electric Weasel Ensemble, the Muse and the Fuse, and the Artist's Research Collective. He served as technical director of the California Institute of the Arts, the San Francisco Tape Music Center, the Electric Circus, and the Electric Symphony. He has collaborated with such luminaries as Ami Radunskaya, David Rosenboom, Anthony Braxton, David Wessel, Morton Subotnick, Peter Apfelbaum, Suzanne Ciani, George Lewis, Nannick Bonnel, and his son, Ezra. He has developed several exotic controllers that provide expressive alternatives to traditional musical input devices; recent inventions include Thunder, Lightning III, Wind, Rain, 50 Fireflies, the Piano Bar, and the Marimba Lumina. He is currently completing a major redesign of the 200 series modular synthesizer (called the 200e) and contemplating his next project. www.buchla.com


buchla.com

History | Don Buchla 1937-2016
History | Buchla Minicomputers became affordable, and Don built the first hybrid (digitally controlled analog synthesizer) - the 500 series (1971). And for Oberheim (a Gibson subsidiary), Don designed the OB-Mx (1995). For your edification and amusement, we've collected data on some of these historic instruments. By the mid 80's, MIDI was abundant. Just about every synth had MIDI inputs. But where were the controllers? Didn't MIDI promise something beyond organ keyboards? Don shifted his attention to controllers and designed the Thunder (1990) and Lightning (1991). To be replaced in 1996 with the improved Lightning II. To finish off the millennium in style, Don built the gold edition of the Marimba Lumina. In 2000 and 2001, he added the silver Marimba Lumina 3.5 and the smaller Marimba Lumina 2.5. And in 2002, Don introduced the Piano Bar, now manufactured and distributed by Moog Music Inc. Now for an abrupt switch. In 2002, Don decided that the 200 series was due for improvement, and in 2004, introduced several new modules, calling these the 200e series. Check 'em out. About Don Buchla Don Buchla is widely regarded as one of the foremost pioneers in electronic musical instrument design. A quick Google search confirms his industry status: It's impossible to find his name without it being preceeded by "synthesis pioneer" or "legendary" or some other superlative that confirms his place in MI history. His reputation as a true innovator of synthesizers and unique performance controllers is honored and revered by fellow engineers, musicians, artists, composers, and academia. Buchla received a degree in physics from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1960. He constructed his first voltage-controlled synthesizer in 1963, and since then has produced a variety of conceptually and technically innovative instruments, each one advancing the state-of-the-art in electronic instrument design. Buchla has consulted for multiple instrument manufacturers, including CBS, Kimball Piano, Zeta Music, Yamaha International, Gibson Guitars, and E-Mu Systems. He has served as technical director of California Institute of the Arts, technical director of the Electric Symphony, and co-director of the Artists' Research Collective. He holds several patents in the fields of optics and musical instruments. Don has received grants from the Veterans Administration (guidance devices for the blind), the Guggenheim Foundation (music languages), and the National Endowment for the Arts (composition). In 2002 he was honored with the prestigious SEAMUS Lifetime Achievement Award "in recognition of his pioneering achievements and lifetime contribution to the art and craft of electro-acoustic music." Don Buchla Interview In that spirit, it's worth noting that Buchla tends to not refer to his instruments as synthesizers, since the name connotes imitating existing sounds and/or instruments. Rather, his intent is to make instruments for creating new sounds. Unrestrained artistic expression is the order of the day. Buchla's design goal manifests itself in many ways, including the omission of a standard piano-style key-board and the addition of a unique "multi-dimensional kinesthetic input port" controller. His method of timbre (tone) generation is not mainstream either, with his frequent use of complex waveshaping oscillators (complex in the sounds they produce, not in operation) rather than the more traditional oscillator/filter combination common to most synthesizers. Even the nomenclature used for Buchla's modular components is unique, yet appropriately descriptive. Rather than an oscillator, filter, amplifier, and sequencer, Buchla's instruments have a Complex Waveform Generator, a Multiple Arbitrary Function Generator, a Source of Uncertainty, a Quad Dynamics Manager, and so on. Buchla has taken his electronic instrument design approach far beyond sound generation into the world of unique performance controllers. Thunder, a tactile, infinitely-programmable control surface, and Lightning, a gesture controller that generates performance data based on the user's spatial movements, are but two of his incredibly advanced, mold-breaking-and mind-boggling-designs. One might think, based on the seemingly esoteric nature of Buchla's designs, that the use of his instruments is limited to experimental, electronic, or computer-based music.


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