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Wrong Derek Brown?

Derek Brown

Quality Assurance and H&S Manager

RGS Investments

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RGS Investments

Background Information

Employment History

Director

Collaborative Business Excellence Pty Ltd

Director

CI Solutions

Dash 8 Pilot

Republic Airways Holdings Inc

Business Improvement Lead Facilitator

Royal Air Force

Business Improvement Manager

Airservices Australia

First Officer

Mesa Airlines

Education

degree

Mechanical Engineering

Imperial College

Web References (27 Total References)


Meet Your Committee - RAFA Costa del Sol

www.rafabenalmadena.co.uk [cached]

Derek Brown President & Welfare Officer

Derek joined the Royal Air Force for his National Service after graduating from Imperial College with a degree in Mechanical Engineering. After induction at RAF Cardington he was posted to RAF Jurby for his 3 months OCTU, emerging with a Commission as a Pilot Officer, then on to RAF St. Athan for technical training. He completed his Service as a Flying Officer at RAF Abingdon with 53 Sqdn as I/C the engine bay for the Beverly transport aircraft. During this posting there were many detachments overseas including Istres in France, el Adem in Libya, Habbanya in Iraq, Bahrain, Sharjah and Aden and also in Cyprus for the Suez fiasco, where EOKA missed him.
Following demob he joined and American oil company CAL TEX in London where he met and married Diana to whom he is still devoted. They were transferred to the CAL TEX refinery in Bahrain where they spent the next 40 years. During this time he kept up his RAF contacts through RAF Muharraq, joined the Malcolm Club and the local branch of the RAFA. There was little welfare work there but plenty of fund raising with sufficient funds raised to furnish one of the rooms at Sussexdown now suitably named "The Bahrain Room". The Bahrain branch closed in the 1970's when the RAF left Bahrain and the RAFA Standard is laid up at the Anglican Cathedral in Manaman, the Capital of Bahrain. Derek and Diana have 2 children, both born in Bahrain and their son works in Dubai keeping up the family tradition.
On retirement he and Diana decided to settle in Spain, where their daughter-in-law comes from, and very soon joined the local RAFA branch as an active member, quickly becoming the branch Welfare Officer, a decision neither he nor the branch regrets. He has attended welfare training courses both here and in UK and he maintains healthy links with our surrounding organisations on welfare matters.


Derek Brown Welfare ...

rafabenalmadena.co.uk [cached]

Derek Brown Welfare Officer

Derek joined the Royal Air Force for his National Service after graduating from Imperial College with a degree in Mechanical Engineering. After induction at RAF Cardington he was posted to RAF Jurby for his 3 months OCTU, emerging with a Commission as a Pilot Officer, then on to RAF St.Athan for technical training. He completed his Service as a Flying Officer at RAF Abingdon with 53 Sqdn as i/c the engine bay for the Beverly transport aircraft. During this posting there were many detachments overseas including Istres in France, el Adem in Libya, Habbanya in Iraq, Bahrain, Sharjah and Aden and also in Cyprus for the Suez fiasco, where EOKA missed him. Following demob he joined and American oil company CAL TEX in London where he met and married Diana to whom he is still devoted. They were transferred to the CAL TEX refinery in Bahrain where they spent the next 40 years. During this time he kept up his RAF contacts through RAF Muharraq, joined the Malcolm Club and the local branch of the RAFA. There was little welfare work there but plenty of fund raising with sufficient funds raised to furnish one of the rooms at Sussexdown now suitably named "The Bahrain Room". The Bahrain branch closed in the 1970's when the RAF left Bahrain and the RAFA Standard is laid up at the Anglican Cathedral in Manaman, the Capital of Bahrain. Derek and Diana have 2 children, both born in Bahrain and their son works in Dubai keeping up the family tradition. On retirement he and Diana decided to settle in Spain, where their daughter-in-law comes from, and very soon joined the local RAFA branch as an active member, quickly becoming the branch Welfare Officer, a decision neither he nor the branch regrets. He has attended welfare training courses both here and in UK and he maintains healthy links with our surrounding organisations on welfare matters.


Master

www.stfaith.com [cached]

These deaths by martyrdom, bombing and old age are in a sense completed by yet another common cause of death, the succumbing to long-term illness which finally drew a former renowned Rector of Havant, Father Derek Brown to God's mercy seat. His requiem mass took place on 7 th August.

...
Derek Brown offered his last days to God and to those who cared for and visited him no doubt hoping that in death as much as in life the purpose of the gospel of Christ might be served.
What we might gain by wresting that control of death unto ourselves is by no means certain to say the very least. When St. Paul, himself martyred, says: 'For to me, living is Christ and dying is gain' he well understood that it is to 'the giver of life' that we offer control over both life and death.
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Canon Derek Brown who was Rector of St. Faith's from 1969 until 2000 passed away peacefully at the Springfield Nursing Home in Emsworth on 22 July 2009.
...
Eulogies were given by Canon Brown's nephew - Derek Brown - and by Penny Moss a former Mayor of Havant.
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An interview Fr Brown gave to Jacki Gould in 2003 for the magazine Anglican Society for the Welfare of Animals for a story of a man who has always been accompanied by a dog - not from choice in one case! - is published as a tribute to a man who loved dogs. It was first published with Father Brown's permission in the July 2006 edition of "Faith Matters".
...
A quarter peal was rung on 7 August when 1260 plain bob triples were rung half muffled to the memory of Canon Derek Brown, aged 81, whose funeral took place at St. Joseph's Catholic Church. Canon Brown was a good friend to the ringers at St. Faith's where he was for 31 years Rector until October 2000.
The Reverend Canon Derek Frederick Brown RIP
The contribution to St Faith's of Father Brown in the 20 th Century was remarkable by any standards. We have very few facts about his early life and I can only assemble an outline of it from the various anecdotes he told me over the years.
The facts are that he was born and brought up in Dover with his mother and elder brother. He told me once that his mother had been a governess at Buckingham Palace and that King Edward VIII had visited her in Dover before going to Portsmouth to board the destroyer which took him to exile in France. Father remained a staunch royalist all his life. He started work during the Second World War at the age of 15 as a clerk employed in Whitehall by the Egyptian Government. Although underage, he joined the Home Guard and used to take his rifle back each night to his lodgings in London
In about 1945, he was called up and joined the RAF at Padgate, near Warrington, where I also started my national service in 1952. He met a girl who invited the young recruit to her home for dinner. To his horror, he discovered that her father was an Air Commodore who very kindly drove him back to Padgate in his RAF car which flew a pennant.
...
Father Brown's return to England attracted radio and newspaper headlines in Australia because his brother and sister-in-law in England had committed suicide leaving a young son, also named Derek. Father returned to take care of his nephew and became Rector of Deptford in a tough part of East London. He soon became a force in the district, winning the respect of the local criminals and setting up one of the first hostels for young drug addicts. He also set up a refuge in the crypt of St Paul's Deptford which was formally opened by Princess Margaret. She paid several visits and to Father's amusement a famous Fleet Street diarist, Nigel Dempsey, suggested in his column that there was a romantic link between them. (I think Father was quite flattered!) At this time, Father served on a Home Office Committee looking at drug addiction in the East End. Two young priests he trained at Deptford were Father Owen Beament and Father Dudley Gummer who remained his lifelong friends and admirers.
In 1969, Father Brown came to St Faith's to succeed Canon Ralph Bassett as Rector.
...
His great friend, Father Tom Grufferty of St Joseph's once said at a Remembrance Day service, "I cannot imagine Havant without Father Brown.
...
Our love and thoughts are with Dominic and Becky James, who Father helped bring up, and, of course, his nephew Derek, the boy who brought him back from Australia.
...
Canon Derek Brown - The Priest Who Loves All Creatures Great and Small and Especially Dogs
When the air raids on London began in the forties the National Air Raid Precautions for Animals Committee (NARPAC) was set up to rescue and care for the animal victims of the Blitz. One of NARPAC's members was Derek's mother who was also in the WVS and responsible for rehousing and blanket distribution for families who had been made homeless in Deptford. Derek was 13 when bereaved pets were brought to his home to be cared for until they could be rehoused. Having been in the Home Guard from the age of 14, he joined the RAFVR and served in the Far East. Whilst in India he befriended a "pariah" dog and found the cruelty to animals heartbreaking.
Derek began his training for the priesthood at St. Augustine's College and acted as Assistant Scoutmaster at the King's School, Canterbury. He got to know Archbishop Fisher, Hewlett Johnson (the Red Dean) and also Dorothy Sayers: he took part in "The Man Born to Be King" which was performed in the Cathedral and supervised by Miss Sayers. In 1949 he finished his training at St. Francis College in Brisbane before joining the Bush Brotherhood of St. Andrew. Father Brown served in the far outback of Queensland. His "parish" was 800 miles west of Rockhampton: his main church was at Winton with a daughter "church" at Boulia (260 miles west of Winton). He travelled some 20,000 miles a year to celebrate mass in homes, cattle stations, cowsheds and wherever needed. Quite often the tail of his international truck served as his altar with the "congregation" kneeling on the desert sand. Four Bush Brothers were supposed to be in post but, due to shortage, he was on his own. Father Brown had to fly to Brisbane to collect a new truck and a family visited him to stay with them for the night. Their young son Ifan asked if he would go with him to a dog rescue centre. Whilst there it transpired that a dog (half dingo) was to be put down because no one would have him. Ifan said to Father Brown "You have to take him - if not you'll be a murderer, you are his only chance". Eventually, after many protests from Father Brown about the travelling he had to do, Ifan won. "What shall I call him? Ifan replied "Ishmael, because he was an outcast" . So back Father Brown and Ishmael went to Winton. Ishmael only survived for a year but he was a great companion and was loved by all. One day Father Brown found Ishmael in agony under the altar - some lunatic had put down steaks filled with ground glass and Ishmael had eaten one. Father Brown had no choice; he had to shoot him. Ishmael was buried by the side of the church and even 25 years later flowers were being placed on his grave. Shortly afterwards, Father Brown was given a prize kelpie (sheepdog). He, too, accompanied his "boss" everywhere. Kelpie took his duties seriously. One day Father Brown was surprised to find an unusually large number of children waiting for the service to begin. He discovered that Kelpie had rounded them up as they were going to the Roman Catholic and Methodist churches and pushed them through the gate to "his" church. During holiday camps at Yeppoon on the Queensland coast Kelpie was appointed to swim to and fro at a designated distance from the shore, so that any boy venturing further out would be quickly shepherded back by a hefty paw-smack on his shoulders. There were, of course, boys on a wooden tower on shark watch. These camps delighted the boys: "Gee, Father, the water's salty! A pineapple grower then gave land so that a permanent holiday centre for boys and girls could be built, with the blessing of the then Governor General Field Marshall Sir William Slim. Funds were raised and the centre was built. The Bishop of Rockhampton appointed Father Brown as his commissioner (this he did not like for he was too young and was resented by some of the older clergy). He then joined the Bush Brotherhood in North Queensland and was Chaplain and Housemaster at All Soul's School, Charter Towers. Naturally Kelpie went with him. All Soul's School was a Brotherhood boarding school for boys who came from far and wide, i.e., Ceylon, New Guinea, Hong Kong and so on. For most it was the first time that they h


RAFA Benalmádena, Send A Message

www.rafabenalmadena.co.uk [cached]

Derek Brown | derek.brownrafabenalmadena.co.uk RAFA Benalmádena, Send A Message

RAFA Benalmádena


Faith Matters for July 2006

www.stfaith.com [cached]

Canon Derek Brown

...
Canon Derek Brown
Jacki Gould interviewed Father Brown in 2003 for the magazine of members of the Anglican Society for the Welfare of Animals for a story of a man who has always been accompanied by a dog - not from choice in one case! The article entitled "The Priest Who Loves All Creatures Great and Small and Especially Dogs" is published in this magazine with Father Brown's permission.
When the air raids on London began in the forties the National Air Raid Precautions for Animals Committee (NARPAC) was set up to rescue and care for the animal victims of the Blitz. One of NARPAC's members was Derek's mother who was also in the WVS and responsible for rehousing and blanket distribution for families who had been made homeless in Deptford. Derek was 13 when bereaved pets were brought to his home to be cared for until they could be rehoused. Having been in the Home Guard from the age of 14, he joined the RAFVR and served in the Far East. Whilst in India he befriended a "pariah" dog and found the cruelty to animals heartbreaking.
Derek began his training for the priesthood at St. Augustine's College and acted as Assistant Scoutmaster at the King's School, Canterbury. He got to know Archbishop Fisher, Hewlett Johnson (the Red Dean) and also Dorothy Sayers: he took part in "The Man Born to Be King" which was performed in the Cathedral and supervised by Miss Sayers. In 1949 he finished his training at St. Francis College in Brisbane before joining the Bush Brotherhood of St. Andrew. Father Brown served in the far outback of Queensland. His "parish" was 800 miles west of Rockhampton: his main church was at Winton with a daughter "church" at Boulia (260 miles west of Winton). He travelled some 20,000 miles a year to celebrate mass in homes, cattle stations, cowsheds and wherever needed. Quite often the tail of his international truck served as his altar with the "congregation" kneeling on the desert sand. Four Bush Brothers were supposed to be in post but, due to shortage, he was on his own. Father Brown had to fly to Brisbane to collect a new truck and a family visited him to stay with them for the night. Their young son Ifan asked if he would go with him to a dog rescue centre. Whilst there it transpired that a dog (half dingo) was to be put down because no one would have him. Ifan said to Father Brown "You have to take him - if not you'll be a murderer, you are his only chance". Eventually, after many protests from Father Brown about the travelling he had to do, Ifan won. "What shall I call him? Ifan replied "Ishmael, because he was an outcast" . So back Father Brown and Ishmael went to Winton. Ishmael only survived for a year but he was a great companion and was loved by all. One day Father Brown found Ishmael in agony under the altar - some lunatic had put down steaks filled with ground glass and Ishmael had eaten one. Father Brown had no choice; he had to shoot him. Ishmael was buried by the side of the church and even 25 years later flowers were being placed on his grave. Shortly afterwards, Father Brown was given a prize kelpie (sheepdog). He, too, accompanied his "boss" everywhere. Kelpie took his duties seriously. One day Father Brown was surprised to find an unusually large number of children waiting for the service to begin. He discovered that Kelpie had rounded them up as they were going to the Roman Catholic and Methodist churches and pushed them through the gate to "his" church. During holiday camps at Yeppoon on the Queensland coast Kelpie was appointed to swim to and fro at a designated distance from the shore, so that any boy venturing further out would be quickly shepherded back by a hefty paw-smack on his shoulders. There were, of course, boys on a wooden tower on shark watch. These camps delighted the boys: "Gee, Father, the water's salty! A pineapple grower then gave land so that a permanent holiday centre for boys and girls could be built, with the blessing of the then Governor General Field Marshall Sir William Slim. Funds were raised and the centre was built. The Bishop of Rockhampton appointed Father Brown as his commissioner (this he did not like for he was too young and was resented by some of the older clergy). He then joined the Bush Brotherhood in North Queensland and was Chaplain and Housemaster at All Soul's School, Charter Towers. Naturally Kelpie went with him. All Soul's School was a Brotherhood boarding school for boys who came from far and wide, i.e., Ceylon, New Guinea, Hong Kong and so on. For most it was the first time that they had left their Mums and Dads and some understandably became homesick. Most evenings Kelpie was absent and Father Brown, when he inspected the dormitories, would see a bulge under a sheet (and under the mosquito net). Sometimes a good housemaster has to close his eyes if it means happiness for a child! Could that happen now, with Health and Safety Regulations? But it worked wonders, and when the boy was happily asleep the dog would return to his quarters. In 1958 Father Brown had to return to England for family reasons. Kelpie was adopted by one of his priest friends, who subsequently became a Bishop. Kelpie had a good life. Father Brown became Rector of Deptford, where he adopted "Sam" a black labrador from a rescue centre. Sam became an excellent friend to all. St. Paul's had a large crypt, which had not been used for 100 years. Father Brown converted this into a community centre having had to remove over 400 coffins; these were placed in two tunnels leading into the crypt which had been used by grave robbers who came from the Thames just down the road. One evening he had a call from his youth leader saying that a gang of hooligans were in the crypt turning over the wheelchairs of the young members of the disabled club. Sam was very fast and raced from the clergy house (which was in the grounds) to the crypt. He recognised the hooligans and leaping over the chairs chased them out before Father Brown or the police arrived. The culprits climbed over the tall iron railings but many of them lost bits of their trousers to Sam's powerful teeth. Needless to say, they never returned! In 1969 Father Brown was appointed Rector of Havant (he retired in 2000). Again Sam proved himself a friend and protector of all, so much so that when he died the people of Havant raised some £500 and a statue of At. Francis was placed in the RSPCA Ark at Stubbington Hampshire where Sam was buried in their small animal cemetery. At the dedication the Lord Mayor of Portsmouth and many other Hampshire mayors were present. Father Brown adopted Tessa, another black labrador who died shortly before he retired. Now "Shadow" a rescue labrador from the Ark lives with him, so named because he never leaves his side, and he's black. Father Brown continues to reach out to children and animals above and beyond his pastoral duties. I know that he is loved and visited by many, now grown men and women, from around the world. In London he was Vice-Chairman of the London Youth Committee. In the early sixties he founded the first hostel in the country for young drug addict offenders. Later in Havant his Boys' Choir made a number of trips to the Continent singing at Roman Catholic and Lutheran churches. Father Brown pays great tribute to the late Princess Margaret, whom he met on many occasions, because of her lifelong commitment to children's welfare. During his time in Havant he has been associated with the Police Liaison Committee and only retired as Chairman in 2000; he and his police friends have together helped many people. As a chaplain in the RNVR and the Royal British Legion he has officiated at some special occasions, and I think he is very proud to be an Honorary Canon of St. Paul's Cathedral in the Diocese of St. Helena in the South Atlantic!

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