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Dennis A. Bente

Associate Professor

University of Texas Medical Branch

HQ Phone:  (409) 797-8000

Direct Phone: (409) ***-****direct phone

Email: d***@***.edu

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

University of Texas Medical Branch

301 University Blvd RT. 0985

Galveston, Texas,77555

United States

Company Description

We are committed to an excellent patient experience. We strive to provide patients with the highest quality of care in a professional, respectful, and compassionate manner. We are committed to our Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences team. We strive to treat al...more

Background Information

Employment History

Visiting Scientist

National Microbiology Laboratory


Web References(8 Total References)


Browse Interviewed Scientists - People Behind the Science Podcast

www.peoplebehindthescience.com [cached]

Dr. Dennis Bente
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston


184: Dr. Dennis Bente: Well-Suited for Innovative Investigations of Deadly Tick-Bourne Viruses - People Behind the Science Podcast

www.peoplebehindthescience.com [cached]

184: Dr. Dennis Bente: Well-Suited for Innovative Investigations of Deadly Tick-Bourne Viruses
184: Dr. Dennis Bente: Well-Suited for Innovative Investigations of Deadly Tick-Bourne Viruses Dr. Dennis Bente is an Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. He received a doctor of veterinary medicine degree and PhD from the University of Veterinary Medicine in Hannover, Germany. He completed postdoctoral research at the Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research in San Antonio and served as a research fellow in the Special Pathogens Program at the National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg Canada. Dennis is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science. People Behind the Science Podcast Show Notes Life Outside of Science Dennis likes spending his time outside of science traveling, hiking, and being outdoors. He is also a big soccer fan and plays in his free time. The Scientific Side In the lab, Dennis studies viruses that cause hemorrhagic fevers. An example of a hemorrhagic fever virus that most people are familiar with is Ebola. Dennis doesn't work on Ebola, but focuses on other hemorrhagic fever viruses that are transmitted by ticks. In high school, Dennis was really interested in biochemistry. He initially considered a career as a biochemist but realized he was less interested in the molecular details and more interested in the big picture that areas like zoology and medicine could provide. After high school, he went straight to veterinary school where a serendipitous internship in tropical medicine sparked his interest in virology. The Low Points: Failures and Challenges Dennis encountered one of the biggest challenges of his career early on. He really struggled to find the right PhD programs and postdoctoral positions. Being an international student added to the struggle, and he felt left to his own devices without the mentoring he needed. Dennis has had fantastic experiences traveling to do field work collecting ticks, including a trip to Turkey. The landscapes of Turkey were incredible and he really enjoyed working with the scientists and local people there. To collect the ticks, he stands out in the fields and just watches ticks crawl towards them and then just picks them off by hand. Quirky Traditions and Funny Memories For his second postdoctoral position, Dennis was at the National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg, Canada. He and his peers were thrilled about the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, so they made their own version of Laboratory Olympics. Dr. Dennis Bente is an Assistant Professor, researcher, and veterinarian. His research focus is on tick-borne hemorrhagic fever viruses such as Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever. What makes Dr. Bente's research most unique is that he and his team are studying this family of diseases under maximum biocontainment conditions in the BSL4 laboratories of UTMB's Galveston National Laboratory. Within the unique research facilities of the GNL, Dr. Bente and his team are breaking new ground in the worldwide fight against these diseases. Dr. Bente considers himself a traditional researcher with non-traditional approaches to his craft. He strives to innovate - not just in the lab, but in communicating the science, practices and findings. Working with some of the world's most dangerous viruses is multifaceted and intricate, but he wants to break down the complexities of our discipline and ignite an understanding that breeds excitement in all audiences. When we can help people truly understand these diseases - on their own terms - our field is stronger for it. Before joining the faculty at UTMB, Dr. Bente held posts at the National Microbiology Laboratory in Canada with Dr. Heinz Feldmann and the Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research in San Antonio with Dr. Rico-Hesse.


www.guidrynews.com

August 03, 2015 -- Guidry News Service recently visited with Dr. Dennis A. Bente, DVM, PhD, Assistant Professor of Microbiology & Immunology at the University of Texas Medical Branch, who is conducting research on tick-borne hemorrhagic fever viruses such as Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever.
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www.guidrynews.com

August 03, 2015 -- Guidry News Service recently visited with Dr. Dennis A. Bente, DVM, PhD, Assistant Professor of Microbiology & Immunology at the University of Texas Medical Branch, who is conducting research on tick-borne hemorrhagic fever viruses such as Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever.
More


guidrynews.com

A visit with Dr. Dennis A. Bente, DVM, PhD
Guidry News Service recently visited with Dr. Dennis A. Bente, DVM, PhD, Assistant Professor of Microbiology & Immunology at the University of Texas Medical Branch, who is conducting research on tick-borne hemorrhagic fever viruses such as Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever. Listen (17:01) Dr. Bente's research is unique in that he and his team are studying this family of diseases in the tick vectors under maximum bio-containment conditions in the BSL4 laboratories at UTMB Galveston's National Laboratory. "We study how these viruses cause disease, and how they're transmitted from ticks to humans and what they do to humans," said Dr. Bente, who is a doctor of veterinary medicine. He explained that people have a perception that there is a separation between human and animal diseases, and the last 20 to 30 years have shown a lot of interplay between animal bugs and humans. "Ticks are kind of like the vector in between; the mediator," said Dr. Bente. "They sit on animals and they feed on animals. Every once in a while, ticks decide to feed on humans and that's when they transmit those diseases that are typically found in animals to humans." Dr. Bente stated his research deals with diseases found in Africa, Asia and parts of Southern Europe. Though the illnesses do not pose a direct threat to United States, he said, they could be introduced locally. "They're probably not an imminent problem in the U.S., but they cause very severe disease," said Dr. Bente. "There's always a good chance that these diseases could be introduced into the U.S." An example of a foreign disease being introduced in the U.S. is that of the West Nile Virus in 1999, he added. "We're not the Border Patrol in that sense, but I think we create the knowledge and the awareness in case something is introduced or how we can prevent these diseases from being introduced," said Dr. Bente. For more on Dr. Bente's research, Click Here Guidry News Service is headquartered in Midtown Houston. at 4001 Fannin Street, Suite 4432, Houston, TX. 77004-4077


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