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This profile was last updated on 2/13/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Child Welfare and Attendance Admi...

Phone: (209) ***-****  HQ Phone
Email: d***@***.us
Stockton Unified School District
701 N. Madison
Stockton, California 95202
United States

Company Description: The Stockton Unified School District serves over 37,000 students and has over 4,500 staff on nearly 60 locations spread over 55 square miles. Raising the quality of...   more
Background

Employment History

18 Total References
Web References
Stockton Unified Child Welfare and ...
www.recordnet.com, 21 Jan 2014 [cached]
Stockton Unified Child Welfare and Attendance administrator Dee Alimbini said the result of so many vaccinations is about a 0.75 percent increase in average daily attendance this year over last year - or about 2,700 fewer sick days for the 37,000-student district.
Typically, 1 percent of attendance equates to roughly $1 million in funding, Alimbini said, adding that she didn't know the exact amount of revenue the attendance bump brings to the district.
Report Calls for Sweeping Overhaul of San Bruno Special Ed - SI&A - School Innovations & Achievement
www.sia-us.com, 14 Nov 2011 [cached]
Specifically, the honors were for Dee Alimbini, Stockton Unified's administrator of child welfare and attendance, as well as her staff, all of whom received plaques.
The recognition was for increasing average daily attendance from 93.38 percent of 37,000-student Stockton Unified's enrollment in 2009-10 to 93.97 percent in 2010-11.
An increase of less than two-thirds of 1 percent might not seem like much, but according to the district, it represented an increase of more than 37,000 learning days for students and $1.3 million in additional state revenue.
"The board knows what we do," Alimbini said of the honor accorded her department. "The district staff knows what we do. It was nice to have an outside entity do it so publicly."
The procedure of sending out a series of three warning letters to families of truants was unchanged in 2010-11, but the practice of holding group meetings with parents of absentee students was new. Alimbini said those meetings played the central role in last year's improvement.
All parents whose children received a second warning letter - after six instances - were invited to group meetings in the east Stockton building that houses Alimbini's department.
The twice-monthly meetings were used to educate parents on the importance of getting their children to school. Parents were warned that being labeled a truant would stick with a child for life, potentially affecting future employment. They also were warned that if they were receiving cash aid, they could lose it if their child continued to miss school.
"We started trying to do more outreach to parents," Alimbini said. "Parents don't necessarily know the law and don't understand the importance of education to their children's future."
Alimbini said 17,000 parents - nearly half Stockton Unified's enrollment - received at least one warning letter last year. Of those, nearly 10,000 got second letters, and it was these parents who were invited to the group meetings.
Alimbini said only five parents came to the first meeting. But by March, she said, the meetings were "standing room only. All told, one-third of the nearly 10,000 second-letter recipients attended the meeting.
"I want them to understand that not sending your child to school is stealing your child's future," Alimbini said.
So far this year, she said, attendance is up nearly another two-thirds of a percentage point from where it was at the same point in 2010-11.
Particularly with younger children, the effects of reduced truancy can ripple through a community, Alimbini said.
"Absenteeism in the early grades is an excellent predictor of dropping out," she added.
Additionally, a Van Buren student ...
www.recordnet.com, 1 Nov 2012 [cached]
Additionally, a Van Buren student recently was caught with a large amount of marijuana, according to Dee Alimbini, administrator of Stockton Unified's child welfare and attendance department.
Lack of new funds putting thousands of kids on preschool waiting lists
www.preschoolcalifornia.org, 7 Jan 2010 [cached]
"We have long waiting lists but don't have the money to open new classrooms," said Dee Alimbini, who oversees Stockton Unified's preschool programs. "We would like to accommodate more students, but it doesn't look like it will be possible."
Stockton Unified has the largest preschool program of any school district in San Joaquin County, serving about 1,200 students in 48 classrooms. It has an annual budget of about $6.5million, Alimbini said, noting that about $3.3million is state funding based on daily student attendance. She said the other $3.2million is received through state grants, many through the First 5 of San Joaquin, the local chapter of a state organization designed to provide educational options for infants to 5-year-olds.
The San Joaquin Head Start program also enrolls about 3,000 preschool students, but it is funded largely with federal money.
With stagnant budgets, administrators such as Alimbini are trying to be creative in the services they provide.
For example, Stockton Unified is implementing a weeklong kindergarten orientation program during the summer for children who will enroll in kindergarten in the fall but have not been exposed to a classroom setting via preschool.
The orientation program will cost about $100,000 and will be paid for with grant money.
"It's one way to prepare students for kindergarten," Alimbini said.
Stockton Unified's Dee ...
www.recordnet.com, 28 Sept 2011 [cached]
Stockton Unified's Dee Alimbini is honored Tuesday by Jack O'Connell, the former state superintendent.CALIXTRO ROMIAS/The Record
...
Specifically, the honors were for Dee Alimbini, Stockton Unified's administrator of child welfare and attendance, as well as her staff, all of whom received plaques.
The recognition was for increasing average daily attendance from 93.38 percent of 37,000-student Stockton Unified's enrollment in 2009-10 to 93.97 percent in 2010-11.
An increase of less than two-thirds of 1 percent might not seem like much, but according to the district, it represented an increase of more than 37,000 learning days for students and $1.3 million in additional state revenue.
"The board knows what we do," Alimbini said of the honor accorded her department. "The district staff knows what we do. It was nice to have an outside entity do it so publicly."
The procedure of sending out a series of three warning letters to families of truants was unchanged in 2010-11, but the practice of holding group meetings with parents of absentee students was new. Alimbini said those meetings played the central role in last year's improvement.
All parents whose children received a second warning letter - after six instances - were invited to group meetings in the east Stockton building that houses Alimbini's department.
The twice-monthly meetings were used to educate parents on the importance of getting their children to school. Parents were warned that being labeled a truant would stick with a child for life, potentially affecting future employment. They also were warned that if they were receiving cash aid, they could lose it if their child continued to miss school.
"We started trying to do more outreach to parents," Alimbini said. "Parents don't necessarily know the law and don't understand the importance of education to their children's future."
Alimbini said 17,000 parents - nearly half Stockton Unified's enrollment - received at least one warning letter last year. Of those, nearly 10,000 got second letters, and it was these parents who were invited to the group meetings.
Alimbini said only five parents came to the first meeting. But by March, she said, the meetings were "standing room only. All told, one-third of the nearly 10,000 second-letter recipients attended the meeting.
"I want them to understand that not sending your child to school is stealing your child's future," Alimbini said.
So far this year, she said, attendance is up nearly another two-thirds of a percentage point from where it was at the same point in 2010-11.
Particularly with younger children, the effects of reduced truancy can ripple through a community, Alimbini said.
"Absenteeism in the early grades is an excellent predictor of dropping out," she added.
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