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Deborah L. Levy

Psychology Research Laboratory

Harvard Companies, Inc.

HQ Phone:  (617) 432-1000

Direct Phone: (617) ***-****direct phone

Email: d***@***.edu

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Harvard Companies, Inc.

180 Longwood Avenue

Boston, Massachusetts,02115

United States

Company Description

Harvard Medical School has more than 7,500 full-time faculty working in 11 academic departments located at the School's Boston campus or in one of 47 hospital-based clinical departments at 17 Harvard-affiliated teaching hospitals and research institutes. Those...more

Background Information

Employment History

Lab Director

McLean Hospital


Positive Psychology Course Instructor

Impact Coaching Academy


Director, Psychology Research Laboratory, McLean Hospital

Harvard University


Business and Life Coach

Coaching Globe


Positive Psychology Coach Training

The Instructor Group , LLC


Lecturer - Positive Psychology Theory and Applications

Tufts University


Hillside Hospital-Long Island Jewish Medical Center


Affiliations

Society for Research in Psychopathology

Executive Board Member


PSYCHOPATHOLOGY INC

Executive Board Member


Brookline High School

Advisor for the Gay Straight Alliance


Education

B.A. degree

University of Chicago


BA

psychology

Amherst College


M.Ed.

Counseling

University of Massachusetts Amherst


Ph.D. degree

University of Chicago


Phd

Dept of Psychiatry

Harvard Medical School


Web References(95 Total References)


Deborah Levy | ISPS NY 2015

isps2015nyc.org [cached]

Deborah Levy
Deborah Levy Deborah L. Levy, Ph.D., is the Director of the Psychology Research Laboratory at McLean Hospital and an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Levy received a B.A. and a Ph.D. from The University of Chicago. She completed an internship and post-doctoral fellowship in clinical psychology at New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center (White Plains campus) and the Menninger Foundation, respectively. In 1991, she joined the staff of McLean Hospital, serving as co-Director of the Psychology Research Laboratory at McLean with Drs. Dr. Levy was appointed Director of the Psychology Research Laboratory. Dr. Levy's research focuses on the pathophysiology and genetic bases of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. Although the role of genetic factors in the etiology of schizophrenia is well known, finding risk gene for schizophrenia has been elusive, at least until recently. Recurrence risk in first-degree relatives of schizophrenics is low (~6.5%), yet the disease persists despite low fecundity in affected individuals. This fact suggests that most of the carriers and transmitters of schizophrenia genes are some of the well siblings and parents of individuals with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. One focus of Dr. Levy's research program is to improve the correct identification of these non-penetrant gene carriers. She and her colleagues have identified and characterized four traits that are associated with schizophrenia and that are over-represented in well relatives of schizophrenic patients: eye tracking dysfunction (primarily impairments of smooth pursuit eye movements), thought disorder (semantic anomalies), craniofacial dysmorphology (asymmetries along the midline of the face that have counterparts in the brain, both of which originate embryologically) and certain evoked response potentials. The higher penetrance of these traits than of schizophrenia itself in families increases the power to detect a major locus for one or more of them, which may, in turn, be associated with the genetic transmission of schizophrenia. Unlike schizophrenia, which is certain to be multigenic, these traits may have a simpler genetic transmission. A second major focus of Dr. Levy's work explores novel mechanisms of genetic mutation. Her laboratory was among the first to explore the role of rare structural rearrangements in the human genome as risk factors for schizophrenia. She and her colleagues have shown that some of these mutations are inherited and that others occur as spontaneous, or de novo, events. Also, they have shown that reciprocal rearrangements of the same genomic regions are involved in schizophrenia and autism.


Using genetic testing to improve mental health, 3 | Geneforum

www.geneforum.org [cached]

Deborah L. Levy, Ph.D, associate professor of psychology in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and director of the Psychology Research Laboratory at McLean Hospital, is studying families to detect relatives who are carriers of the genes for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, even though these individuals don't have the diseases themselves.
"One of the key issues in any genetic study is to distinguish individuals who are gene carriers from individuals who are not gene carriers," explains Dr. Levy. In single gene disorders, such as cystic fibrosis and Huntington's disease, 25 percent and 50 percent of family members, respectively, have the same illness. In contrast, only 6.5 percent of family members of people with schizophrenia actually have the illness, which means most relatives don't have symptoms of the illness but may still be gene carriers. To find the relatives who are likely carriers of genes for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, Dr. Levy and her colleagues have zeroed in on four discernable schizophrenia-related traits that occur in well family members at a much higher rate than schizophrenia itself: difficulty following a slow moving target with one's eyes, syntax errors or idiosyncratic use of language, subtle anomalies involving the midline of the face, and difficulty filtering out noises and other irrelevant stimuli (a condition known as sensory gating). These traits, according to Dr. Levy, are much more common in families with schizophrenia.


omicsonline.org

Deborah L Levy
Associate Professor Department of Psychiatry Harvard Medical School Biographical Statement: Dr. Deborah L. Levy received a B.A. degree in 1972 and a Ph.D. degree in 1976 from the University of Chicago. She completed a clinical internship at New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center (Westchester Division) and a postdoctoral fellowship in clinical psychology at The Menninger Foundation in Topeka KS. She is currently Director of the Psychology Research Laboratory at McLean Hospital and Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. Her primary professional activity is directing a research program on the pathophysiology and genetic bases of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. One aim of her research program is to improve the correct identification of these non-penetrant gene carriers. A second major focus of her work explores novel mechanisms of genetic mutation.


commonhealth.wbur.org

This Saturday night, Dr. Steve Seiner, who oversees the large electroshock (more correctly known as electroconvulsive therapy) program at McLean Hospital will be on hand, and on Mar. 29, Dr. Ken Duckworth, the medical director for NAMI nationally and a former Massachusetts commissioner of mental health, will answer questions along with schizophrenia expert Dr. Deborah Levy, director of McLean's Psychology Research Laboratory.
It's hard to predict what people will ask, Dr. Levy said, but she hopes to offer audience members "a reality check on what's realistic and what's not" in the show.


www.psychomedia.net

Deborah L. Levy, Ph.D.
Mailman Research Center McLean Hospital 115 Mill Street Belmont, MA 02478 617-855-2854, Fax 617-855-2778 800-695-9005 ext. 2854


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