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Wrong David Gantz?

Prof. David Gantz A.

Samuel M. Fegtly Professor of Law

University of Arizona

Direct Phone: (520) ***-****       

Email: d***@***.edu

University of Arizona

888 N. Euclid Ave. Room 413

Tucson, Arizona 85721

United States

Company Description

The University of Arizona is one of the nation's leading public universities, with a long history of academic excellence, research innovation and a student-centered approach. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, the UA is rank ... more

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Background Information

Employment History

Of Counsel
Dorsey & Whitney LLP

Adjunct Professor of Law
Georgetown University Law Center

Affiliations

Council Member
The Center for American and International Law

Education



Stanford Law School

A.B.

Harvard College

Master's Degree
Music

Web References (164 Total References)


All of that seems to lead ...

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All of that seems to lead to the logical conclusion that the company wants to wait for more favourable climate, both economically and politically, said David Gantz, who teaches international trade law at the University of Arizona.

Gantz noted that Hillary Clinton, widely thought to be the front-runner to win the Democratic nomination for president, came out against the pipeline in September.
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"You can be fairly sure that Mrs. Clinton will maintain her opposition to XL, and you can be almost equally sure that whoever is the Republican nominee … will be in favour of it," Gantz said.


David A. ...

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David A. Gantz

David A. Gantz is Samuel M. Fegtly Professor of Law and the former Director of the International Trade and Business Law Program at the University of Arizona, James E. Rogers College of Law. He also serves as He is also associated faculty for the Center for Latin American Studies. He has taught courses in international trade law, international environmental law, NAFTA and Other Regional Trade Agreements, public international law, international business transactions, international investment and technology transfer, European Union law and the U.S. legal system. He is a faculty adviser to the Arizona Journal of International and Comparative Law...Read More


Professor David A. Gantz - ...

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Professor David A. Gantz - Citeel

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Professor David A. Gantz
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Professor David A. Gantz
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David A. Gantz is Samuel M. Fegtly Professor of Law and the former Director of the International Trade and Business Law Program at the University of Arizona, James E. Rogers College of Law. He also serves as He is also associated faculty for the Center for Latin American Studies. He has taught courses in international trade law, international environmental law, NAFTA and Other Regional Trade Agreements, public international law, international business transactions, international investment and technology transfer, European Union law and the U.S. legal system. He is a faculty adviser to the Arizona Journal of International and Comparative Law.
David is a graduate of Harvard College (A.B. 1964) and Stanford Law School (J.D. 1967, J.S.M. 1970).
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From 1981-93, David was an adjunct professor of law at the Georgetown University Law Center. He has served as a binational panelist under the trade dispute resolution provisions of Chapters 19 and 20 of NAFTA, as a NAFTA Chapter 11 arbitrator, and as an expert witness in other trade and investment disputes. He has also served as the U.S. judge on the Administrative Tribunal of the Organization of American States. David has written extensively on NAFTA customs and trade law issues, NAFTA and WTO dispute resolution, foreign bribery and other international trade, investment and environmental law matters, including NAFTA AND WESTERN HEMISPHERE FREE TRADE (Thomson/West, 2005) (with Ralph Folsom and Michael Gordon) and treatise, REGIONAL TRADE AGREEMENTS: LAW, POLICY AND PRACTICE (Carolina, 2009)and LIBERALIZING INTERNATIONAL TRADE AFTER DOHA: MULTILATERAL, PLURILATERAL, REGIONAL AND UNILATERAL INITIATIVES (Cambridge, 2013).


by David A. ...

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by David A. Gantz

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Professor David A. Gantz
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by David A. Gantz
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Professor David A. Gantz
Online Certificate
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David A. Gantz, Liberalizing International Trade after Doha: Multilateral,Plurilateral, Regional and Unilateral Approaches (Cambridge University Press, 2015)
Check Out the Book
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Professor David A. Gantz
David A. Gantz, AB (Harvard College), JD, JSM (Stanford Law School), is Samuel M. Fegtly Professor and the former director of the international trade and business law program at the University of Arizona, James E. Rogers College of Law, where he still teaches and writes in the areas of international trade and investment law, regional trade agreements, public international law and international environmental law. He served earlier in the Office of the Legal Adviser, U.S. Department of State and practiced law in Washington, D.C. Gantz is the author or co-author of four books and more than 50 law review articles and book chapters, has served as a consultant for the UNDP, USAID and the World Bank, among others, and served as a panelist under Chapters 11, 19 and 20 of NAFTA…


Scrutinizing RTAs: A Comparative Review of David Gantz, Regional Trade Agreements: Law, Policy and Practice (Durham: Carolina Academic Press, 2009) | Bhala | Trade, Law and Development

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A Comparative Review of David Gantz, Regional Trade Agreements: Law, Policy and Practice (Durham: Carolina Academic Press, 2009)

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One recent and most welcome addition to this library is Regional Trade Agreements: Law, Policy and Practice (hereinafter, Regional Trade Agreements) by Professor David Gantz.
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Holding a chaired professorship at the University of Arizona College of Law, Professor Gantz also serves as Associate Director of the National Law Center for Inter-American Free Trade, and is a member of the American Arbitration Association. Professor Gantz has authored or co-authored four books, and numerous articles, on international trade issues. He has been both a panelist and arbitrator under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), including as an arbitrator in the infamous dispute between the United States and Canada over Softwood Lumber. He has also been a consultant to the Vietnamese Ministry of Justice on Trade Law Issues (2000-2001), a Consultant to the National Law Center for Inter-American Free Trade on Customs and Trade Law Issues (1999-present), and a Judge for the Administrative Tribunal of the Organization of American States (1987-1985).
During his career, Professor Gantz has received many accolades, including a Superior Honor Award in 1974 from the United States Department of State, and a Certificate of Appreciation from the Multinational Force and Observer in 1987 for legal services relating to its peacekeeping mission.
As an educator, Professor Gantz began his teaching career in 1967 as a Visiting Professor of Law at the University of Costa Rica, after having been awarded the Ford Foundation Fellowship for Latin American Legal Studies. He continued his teaching career as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center from (1981-1993), and as a Lecturer in Law at the University of Pennsylvania (1986). Since 1993, he has served at the James E. Rogers College of Law at the University of Arizona as a Professor of Law, and as the Director of its International Trade Law Program. He is a Samuel M. Flegtly Professor of Law, and was the recipient of the 2006 Arthur Andrews Distinguished Teaching/Mentoring Award.
III. Outline of the Book
Regional Trade Agreements is a 507 page hardcover book with margins that leave plenty of room for notes, and a font size large enough not to strain the readers eyes. Professor Gantz provides the reader not only with the standard contents, table of cases, indexes, and list of abbreviations, but also provides a list of websites useful to students who wish to do additional research. In the indexes Professor Gantz has provided readers with relevant excerpts from the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), Article XXIV; the Understanding on the Interpretation of Article XXIV of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade 1994; the Transparency Mechanism for Regional Trade Agreements; the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS), Article V; and the Enabling Clause.
In this work Professor Gantz successfully combines the benefits of a textbook with the expansive nature of an encyclopedia. Professor Gantz has divided his book into three parts. Part One is comprised of the first four chapters of the text, and provides the reader with an introduction to RTAs. Part Two discusses U.S. RTAs in Chapters Five through Ten. Part Three is titled Other Significant Regional Trade Agreements, and covers the European Union (EU), the Southern Cone Common Market (MERCOSUR), the Central American Common Market (CACM), the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN), and the Southern African Customs Union (SACU).
Professor Gantz discusses many different and important RTAs, thereby providing the reader with an encyclopedia of sorts. This text discusses both major RTAs such as the EU, and MERCOSUR, while also focusing on less widely discussed RTAs like the U.S.-Vietnam Bilateral Trade Agreement (VBIT). It provides an excellent starting place for any student or practitioner who wishes to become better acquainted with one of the covered RTAs. Professor Gantz describes each covered RTA that is in force in varying degrees of detail, but only briefly. Because of the expansive nature of complex agreements a much larger text, which would probably have to consist of multiple volumes, would be needed to thoroughly discuss the intricacies of RTAs such as the NAFTA, and the EU. Instead, Professor Gantz provides readers with a series of introductions to RTAs. He does this in ten chapters, eight of which are specific to a certain agreement.
Gantzs system works well, and provides a thorough introduction to the discussed RTA. For instance Chapter Seven fully discusses the U.S.-Central American-Dominican Republic Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR). Not only does Professor Gantz discuss the policies and motivations of the Parties, but also he fully discusses issues in interpreting and applying CAFTA-DR by providing a brief summary of every chapter of the agreement!
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In addition to defining the term RTA, and providing a reader with an explanation of his methodology, Professor Gantz also discusses GATT Article XXIV, the history of RTAs, and a discussion of the costs and benefits of RTAs. Chapter Four of the text, which provides a useful index of RTAs, is worth highlighting.
Chapter Four is a tabular description of RTAs by which the reader is provided with both a basic survey of RTA provisions contained in selected RTAs (Table 4.1), and a listing of the RTAs that have been notified to the WTO and are in force (Table 4.2). [3] For instance, in Table 4.1 an entry is dedicated to the Mexico-Japan RTA. One aspect of this agreement is the agreed upon treatment of immigration between the parties. In this block Professor Gantz has placed the abbreviation TVB. By referencing the explanation of categories section [4] the reader will know that TVB indicates that this RTA allows for expedited procedures for temporary visitors for business, to facilitate efforts by nationals of one RTA party to manage investments or market goods or services in the territories of the other parties (TVB). [5] Readers are thereby provided with information about many more RTAs than can be specifically addressed in dedicated chapters. However, because of the complexity of RTAs and the sophistication of many of their provisions Professor Gantz acknowledges that Table 4.1 cannot thoroughly describe each covered RTA.
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For instance Professor Gantz discusses The Food, Conservation and Energy Act of 2008, [8] which increases farm subsidies possibly to levels above the United States scheduled commitments, which found support not only in farming states, but also in urban areas because the Act includes increases in funds available for nutrition programs such as food stamps and school lunches as well as environmental measures such as reducing pollution in the Chesapeake Bay, [9] This quote highlights some of the complexities found in the politics and policy of the U.S. trade position. This discussion continues through Chapter Five, and includes information about trade promotion authority (TPA), and the Bipartisan Trade Deal (BTD) of 2007.
Beginning in Chapter Six, and continuing throughout the remainder of the text Professor Gantz provides an encyclopedia of information concerning major RTAs present in the world today. Roughly 200 pages are devoted to RTAs the United States has entered into, and covers not only major RTAs in force, but also includes brief discussions of pending agreements. Professor Gantz introduces the highlighted RTA by laying it out either by chapter, in the case of U.S. RTAs, or by substantive area.
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For instance, Professor Gantzs goal in Chapter Six is to provide the reader with a reasonably comprehensive introduction to NAFTA, still by far the most important U.S. FTA, and the most important RTA world-wide in terms of total trade after the European Union, [10] which continues to impact world trade through its influence on both subsequent U.S. RTAs as well as those concluded by many other countries. [11] Professor Gantz truly has met his goal. He has provided a discussion of NAFTAs predecessors, mainly the United States-Canada Free Trade Agreement (CFTA), and the influence of the 1965 Auto Pact. [12]
Professor Gantz also discusses the motivations of the parties. He describes the U.S. motivation as a mix of political, economic and security considerations, as well as a desire to encourage completion of the stalled Uruguay Round, [13] Canadas motivation as a fear that NAFTA would dilute the benefits it gained through the CFTA, and the pressure it feels from being neighbors with the worlds largest economy [14] and Mexicos desire to expand the maquiladora program, institute economic reforms, and create jobs, among other goals. [15]
After this introduction Professor Gantz briefly discusses each chapter of NAFTA. After discussing the preamble, the objectives found in Chapter One, and the definitions found in chapter two, Professor Gantz provides a comprehensive summary of the chapters in order of ascendancy.
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Professor Gantz provides an overview of the economic hi

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