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Wrong David Baskin?

David S. Baskin

Director

Houston Methodist

HQ Phone:  (713) 790-3333

Direct Phone: (713) ***-****direct phone

Email: d***@***.org

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Houston Methodist

6565 Fannin Street

Houston, Texas,77030

United States

Company Description

Houston Methodist Willowbrook Hospital is a 312 bed, not-for-profit, faith-based hospital, which is part of Houston Methodist. The hospital has expanded in Northwest Houston to serve the comprehensive health care needs of the growing community. Houston Metho...more

Background Information

Employment History

Professor

Baylor College of Medicine


Consulting Physician

Johnson Space Center


Vice Chairman

The Methodist Hospital corporation


Research Professor

University of Houston


Affiliations

OnKure Inc

Scientific Advisor


National Institutes of Health

Scientific Advisory Boards


Cure Autism Now Foundation

Board Member


The Scientific Review Council

Founder


Education

Mt. Sinai School of Medicine


Swarthmore College


M.D.


M.D.

Baylor College of Medicine


M.D.

Harvard Medical School


M.D.

Methodist Neurological Institute


M.D.

Ohio State University


M.D.

The Methodist Hospital Research Institute


M.D.

Weill-Cornell College of Medicine , New York City


MD

National Institutes of Mental Health


Ph.D.

Rice University's Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science


Web References(142 Total References)


www.methodisthealth.com

David S. Baskin, M.D.


bonoi.org [cached]

As reported on the cover of the April 2015ChemMedChem (early online), Houston Methodist Kenneth R. Peak Brain & Pituitary Tumor Center Director David S. Baskin, M.D., and Peak Center Head of Research Martyn Sharpe, Ph.D. designed a drug called MP-MUS that destroyed 90 to 95 percent of malignant glioma cells, yet in other experiments did not seem to adversely affect healthy human brain cells (in vitro).
Researchers hope to begin testing the drug in human clinical trials in 2016 or 2017 "We are very optimistic that we'll get there," said Baskin, also Vice Chair of the Department of Neurosurgery at Houston Methodist Hospital. "Our past work has shown that MP-MUS has very low toxicity until it gets into tumor cells. Once it arrives, it is changed to its active form, doing a lot of damage where we want it to, leaving healthy brain cells alone-a bit like a 'smart bomb.' To our knowledge, this is the first known example of selective mitochondrial chemotherapy, which we believe represents a powerful new approach to brain cancer. Medical options for brain tumor patients are woeful, Baskin said. "It's a horrible diagnosis. Because of where the tumors are located, and because of the way they can infiltrate healthy tissue, surgery is often not helpful long term. The most effective chemotherapy drug available right now, temozolomide, only extends life from 9 to 15 months, and patients' quality of life during that period isn't very good. For that reason, Baskin said, he and researchers around the world have been looking for new treatment approaches, such as vaccines intended to aid the body's immune system's recognition and removal of tumor cells, gene therapy and, in the present case, targeting tumor cell mitochondria. This means that healthy cells are only exposed to low levels of MP-MUS and their mitochondria to very low levels of P+-MUS, Baskin says. On the other hand, in tumor cells the vast majority of the pro-drug is converted into P+-MUS, which essentially traps the drug inside their mitochondria where it attacks the mitochondrial DNA. "We found that we could achieve profound effects with MP-MUS at very low concentrations, around 75 micromolar," said Baskin, Professor of Neurological Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College.


stpaulapwu.org [cached]

"Glioblastoma is the most malignant brain tumor you can have," said study co-author Dr. David Baskin, professor of neurosurgery with both Houston Methodist Hospital and the Weill-Cornell College of Medicine in New York City.
"It's almost always a death sentence, with median survival of about nine to 15 months, and the quality of life during the last five months is often quite poor. "Surgery, along with chemotherapy and radiation, is the only current treatment option," he added. "This cancer is like an octopus -- it reaches into all parts of the brain [and] you can only ever get some of it out." However, "this particular gene therapy is better than anything else we have," said Baskin, who also directs the Peak Brain Tumor Center at the Houston hospital. "By inserting a virus into the tumor, then attacking that virus with medication while also firing up the patient's own immune system, you can get a real one-two punch treatment effect, and prolonged survival." He stressed that the treatment may not be a cure. "The [survival] numbers still stink," Baskin said. "But they're significantly better, which makes this a big advance." Baskin and his team are slated to present their findings Sunday in Chicago at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. The result, said Baskin, is that "suddenly the immune system starts killing anything that might have these proteins. So you put the Trojan horse virus in. Then, after you kill the virus the tumor cells explode, causing the immune system to hyper-activate without raising toxicity [to the patient]." "It's interesting and exciting, because the improvement [in survival] is significant," Baskin said. "We're not saying we have a cure, of course," noted Baskin. SOURCES: David Baskin, M.D., professor, neurosurgery, and director, Kenneth R. Peak Brain Tumor Center, Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas, and professor, neurosurgery, Weill-Cornell College of Medicine, New York City; Balveen Kaur, Ph.D., professor, neurological surgery, and associate director, Medical Center at the Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio; May 31, 2015, presentation, annual meeting, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Chicago, Ill.


www.beckersspine.com [cached]

17. Spine surgeon leader to know: Dr. David Baskin of Houston Methodist
David Baskin, MD, is a neurosurgeon at Houston Methodist and a professor of neurosurgery at Weill Cornell Medical College.


www.beckersspine.com [cached]

4. Spine surgeon leader to know: Dr. David Baskin of Houston Methodist
David Baskin, MD, is a neurosurgeon at Houston Methodist and a professor of neurosurgery at Weill Cornell Medical College.


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