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Wrong David Onorato?

David Onorato

Associate Research Scientist

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

HQ Phone:  (850) 488-5600

Email: d***@***.com

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

620 South Meridian Street

Tallahassee, Florida,32399

United States

Company Description

The FWC manages fisheries in state waters, but has a strong interest in how fish are managed in federal waters and how that management affects Floridians. FWC staff serves on both the South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Councils and coordinate...more

Web References(70 Total References)


FloridaPanther.com Scroller Page

floridapanther.com [cached]

With less room to roam and their numbers jumping from an estimated 20 to 30 cats in the early 1990s to between 100 and 120 today, panthers are being forced to cross roadways to find new territory, said Dave Onorato, an associate research scientist with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.
But state panther expert and biologist Dave Onorato said Ave Maria "would be considered in the middle of the habitat. "We know they are taking pets periodically, whether it's dogs or cats," said Onorato, the state panther expert. They have told federal officials "they should be managing for more panthers, not less," said Onorato. As David Onorato of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission carefully opened the giant refrigerator where the bodies were kept, I couldnt help myself. My heart raced. My muscles tensed. The traffic fatalities are terrible, said Dr. Onorato, but we must remember theres reproduction going on, some of which we dont document. Call them panthers, pumas, cougars or mountain lions, but cats they remain, and cats have a defiantly syncopated way of coming back again and again. As Dr. Onorato and other researchers see it, the tale of the Florida panther is twitchier and more sinuous than its long tail, a continuing saga of highs and lows, hopes and oh nos. All of our research and management, our budget, equipment everything is supported by purchases of these cat tags, said Dr. Onorato, one of five state researchers devoted entirely to studying the biology and conservation of the panther. Among panthers living in prime areas away from roads, said Dr. Onorato, the No. 1 cause of death is intraspecific aggression one panther killing another. So far this year 20 panthers have died, according to Dave Onorato, a scientist with the wildlife commission's panther team.


www.myfwc.com

"We are grateful to everyone who provided us with the information that led to the successful capture of this kitten," said FWC panther biologist Dr. Dave Onorato.
Because the panther was orphaned at such a young age, it will not be possible to return her to the wild. While she is acclimating to her new surroundings, the kitten will not be on display to the public. She is likely to stay behind the scenes at Naples Zoo at least several weeks while a determination is made regarding a permanent home. When she is placed in a permanent home, her story will be a valuable tool in educating the public about panther conservation, what the FWC does and what the public can do to help.


www.guelphmercury.com

"It really depends on what you define a subspecies to be," said Dave Onorato, a biologist with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission who worked on the panther restoration project.
"Perhaps they're now more close to what they were before they became inbred." Onorato said the Florida panther case could be held up as an example for people trying to protect big cats around the world, including the most stressed tiger populations.


2011 Information - Florida Panther Festival

www.floridapantherfestival.com [cached]

Dave Onorato, Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission


www.miaminewtimes.com

"When people say they're seeing all these panthers on their property, very often it's the same one coming back again and again," says Dave Onorato, a panther biologist with Florida's Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.


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