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This profile was last updated on 1/22/04  and contains information from public web pages.
 
Background

Employment History

  • Air Midwest
  • Captain
Web References
heraldsun.com: Pilot: I was demoted for reporting ...
www.heraldsun.com, 22 Jan 2004 [cached]
The U.S. Labor Department is investigating the complaint by Capt. Dave Bumpus, 38, who says Air Midwest removed him from its training department after he made safety-related complaints.
The airline denies the allegation, which was reported Wednesday by The Charlotte Observer.
...
Gillman said Bumpus was demoted for failing to follow a supervisor's order that had nothing to do with safety.
...
Bumpus says he refused to fly because he had recently consumed alcohol while off duty.Federal Aviation Administration regulations prohibit airline employees from acting as crew members for eight hours after the consumption of alcohol.
Two days later, Bumpus said, he was asked to fly with another pilot, even though he believed their combined weight would exceed FAA-approved procedures for Air Midwest's 19-seat turboprop planes.
Gillman said that in the July 11 incident, Bumpus was asked only to travel to Ithaca as a passenger, with no official duties.
...
Bumpus alleges that he was demoted from Air Midwest's training department Aug. 6, a day after telling the airline's training director that he had been asked to do things he believed violated FAA rules.He says he also told the training director that he had contacted the FAA.
As a training department member, Bumpus received extra pay for training pilots.Bumpus says the demotion has reduced his annual salary from about $43,500 to $30,000.
Safety at Air Midwest has been under scrutiny since one of the airline's planes crashed shortly after takeoff from Charlotte-Douglas International Airport on Jan. 8, 2003, killing all 19 passengers and crew members aboard.Investigators for the National Transportation Safety Board have blamed maintenance errors and excessive weight for the crash.
Bumpus, who has worked at Air Midwest since 2000, said he has long raised concerns about what he sees as safety violations and unethical treatment of pilots at the airline.
"I'm trying to promote safety at this airline, especially after the crash," he said.
Bumpus said Air Midwest told him he was demoted because of a remark he made to a crew scheduler at the airline.
According to Bumpus' account, when he arrived at the Ithaca airport on the night of July 12, an airline scheduler told him he should stay at a hotel an hour away and report for work early the next morning.
Bumpus says he told the crew scheduler she must have been "smoking crack," because such an arrangement would not allow him enough sleep to fly safely the next day.
He said he was told July 17 that he would be removed from the training department if he did not apologize for the remark, which he says he did Aug. 5.
Hendersonville Times-News
www.hendersonvillenews.com, 21 Jan 2004 [cached]
The U.S. Labor Department is investigating the complaint by Capt. Dave Bumpus, 38, who says Air Midwest removed him from its training department after he made safety-related complaints.
The airline denies the allegation, which was reported Wednesday by The Charlotte Observer.
...
Gillman said Bumpus was demoted for failing to follow a supervisor's order that had nothing to do with safety.
...
Bumpus says he refused to fly because he had recently consumed alcohol while off duty.Federal Aviation Administration regulations prohibit airline employees from acting as crew members for eight hours after the consumption of alcohol.
Two days later, Bumpus said, he was asked to fly with another pilot, even though he believed their combined weight would exceed FAA-approved procedures for Air Midwest's 19-seat turboprop planes.
Gillman said that in the July 11 incident, Bumpus was asked only to travel to Ithaca as a passenger, with no official duties.
...
Bumpus alleges that he was demoted from Air Midwest's training department Aug. 6, a day after telling the airline's training director that he had been asked to do things he believed violated FAA rules.He says he also told the training director that he had contacted the FAA.
As a training department member, Bumpus received extra pay for training pilots.Bumpus says the demotion has reduced his annual salary from about $43,500 to $30,000.
Safety at Air Midwest has been under scrutiny since one of the airline's planes crashed shortly after takeoff from Charlotte-Douglas International Airport on Jan. 8, 2003, killing all 19 passengers and crew members aboard.Investigators for the National Transportation Safety Board have blamed maintenance errors and excessive weight for the crash.
Bumpus, who has worked at Air Midwest since 2000, said he has long raised concerns about what he sees as safety violations and unethical treatment of pilots at the airline.
"I'm trying to promote safety at this airline, especially after the crash," he said.
Bumpus said Air Midwest told him he was demoted because of a remark he made to a crew scheduler at the airline.
According to Bumpus' account, when he arrived at the Ithaca airport on the night of July 12, an airline scheduler told him he should stay at a hotel an hour away and report for work early the next morning.
Bumpus says he told the crew scheduler she must have been "smoking crack," because such an arrangement would not allow him enough sleep to fly safely the next day.
He said he was told July 17 that he would be removed from the training department if he did not apologize for the remark, which he says he did Aug. 5.
StarNewsOnline.com: The Voice of Southeastern North Carolina
www.wilmingtonstar.com, 20 Feb 2004 [cached]
The U.S. Labor Department rejected the complaint by Capt. Dave Bumpus, who said Air Midwest removed him from its training department in August.Bumpus said he will appeal the dismissal.
The Labor Department said in a letter to Bumpus that it heard credible evidence he was properly removed for failing to promptly apologize for a remark made to a crew scheduler, not in retaliation for his safety concerns.
Bumpus' complaint alleges he was demoted after he refused to serve as an extra crew member on a July 11 flight from Charlotte to Ithaca, N.Y.He said he refused to fly because he had recently consumed alcohol while off duty.Federal Aviation Administration regulations prohibit airline employees from acting as crew members for eight hours after the consumption of alcohol.
But the Labor Department said the dismissal stemmed from his remark to the scheduler.Bumpus said that, after he arrived at the Ithaca airport on the night of July 12, she told him he should stay at a hotel an hour away and report for work early the next morning.
Bumpus said he told her she must have been "smoking crack" if she believed he'd do that because it wouldn't allow him enough sleep to fly safely the next day.
Airline officials told Bumpus he'd be removed from the training department unless he apologized for the remark, the Labor Department found.On Aug. 5, the airline found Bumpus hadn't apologized and told him he would be removed as an instructor.The Labor Department said he e-mailed the woman an apology several hours later.
heraldsun.com: Air Midwest pilot's whistleblower c...
www.heraldsun.com, 20 Feb 2004 [cached]
The U.S. Labor Department rejected the complaint by Capt. Dave Bumpus, who said Air Midwest removed him from its training department in August.Bumpus said he will appeal the dismissal.
The Labor Department said in a letter to Bumpus that it heard credible evidence he was properly removed for failing to promptly apologize for a remark made to a crew scheduler, not in retaliation for his safety concerns.
Bumpus' complaint alleges he was demoted after he refused to serve as an extra crew member on a July 11 flight from Charlotte to Ithaca, N.Y.He said he refused to fly because he had recently consumed alcohol while off duty.Federal Aviation Administration regulations prohibit airline employees from acting as crew members for eight hours after the consumption of alcohol.
But the Labor Department said the dismissal stemmed from his remark to the scheduler.Bumpus said that, after he arrived at the Ithaca airport on the night of July 12, she told him he should stay at a hotel an hour away and report for work early the next morning.
Bumpus said he told her she must have been "smoking crack" if she believed he'd do that because it wouldn't allow him enough sleep to fly safely the next day.
Airline officials told Bumpus he'd be removed from the training department unless he apologized for the remark, the Labor Department found.On Aug. 5, the airline found Bumpus hadn't apologized and told him he would be removed as an instructor.The Labor Department said he e-mailed the woman an apology several hours later.
KWCH 12 | Whistleblowing pilot files complaint against Air Midwest
www.kwch.com, 21 Jan 2004 [cached]
The Labor Department is investigating the complaint in North Carolina by Captain Dave Bumpus.He says the company moved him out of its training department because of his reports.
The airline denies the allegation.An Air Midwest lawyer insists the carrier has followed federal safety regulations.
The lawyer contends Bumpus' demotion had nothing to do with his safety complaints, but instead came after Bumpus failed to follow a supervisor's order.
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