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2006-03-26T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Darryl King?

Mr. Darryl P. King

Senior Property Manager

Fifth Avenue Committee , Inc.

Direct Phone: (718) ***-**** ext. **       

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Fifth Avenue Committee , Inc.

621 Degraw St

Brooklyn, New York 11217

United States

Company Description

"Fifth Avenue Committee and our Stronger Together partners are deeply committed to advancing equity and lifting people out of poverty in Red Hook and Gowanus," said Michelle de la Uz, executive director of FAC. Yannerys Castillo, the coordinator of Stro ... more

Find other employees at this company (30)

Background Information

Employment History

FAC

Affiliations

Client Advisory Board Member
New York State Defenders Association

Education

bachelor's degree

college degree

master's degree

Web References (15 Total References)


fifth avenue committee | brooklyn, ny

ww.fifthave.org [cached]

Photo of Developing Justice Project Director Darryl King

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Project Director Darryl King
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Darryl King's compelling story www.innocentprisoner.org
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Darryl King, the Project's Director, draws on his own experience of spending 25 years behind bars for a crime he did not commit.After his release, he became FAC's Senior Property Manager, managing the buildings we have developed.Darryl worked with FAC's Board and staff to launch the Developing Justice Project.
Criminal Justice Program Staff
Darryl P. King, Director (718-857-2990 x56)


fifth avenue committee | brooklyn, ny

www.fifthave.org [cached]

Photo of Developing Justice Project Director Darryl King

...
Project Director Darryl King
...
Darryl King, the Project's Director, draws on his own experience of spending 25 years behind bars for a crime he did not commit.After his release, he became FAC's Senior Property Manager, managing the buildings we have developed.Darryl worked with FAC's Board and staff to launch the Developing Justice Project.
Criminal Justice Program Staff
Darryl P. King, Director (718-857-2990 x56)


The police fingered Darryl ...

www.innocentprisoner.org [cached]

The police fingered Darryl King, a 21-year-old former military policeman, for the crime.The two witnesses who identified King as one of the stick-up men split $5000 in reward money, but they both later recanted their testimony.

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The other witness, Lorraine Hawthorne, had seen King earlier that day talking to a manager of the restaurant about a job.
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By the time the dust cleared, everyone seemed to agree that King must be innocent.But by then he was already in prison.
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Despite their efforts Darryl King spent twenty-five years in jail, where he earned a high-school equivalancy degree, a bachelor's degree and a master's degree.He now works with the Fifth Avenue Committee in Park Slope, Brooklyn as the director of the Developing Justice in South Brooklyn Project, seeking to forge ties between community and recently released prison inmates.
Get the story in detail in our press file, or learn how you can help Darryl and people like him to bring justice to the criminal justice system by being an activist.If you want to help Darryl raise money to fight to clear his name, click here.


Coro: Coro New York - Leadership New York Class XIII

www.coro.org [cached]

Darryl King works for the Fifth Avenue Committee as the Co-Founder and Director of the Developing Justice in South Brooklyn Project which is designed to help ex-offenders reintegrate back to the community.He is an ex-offender who spent 25 years in prison for a crime he didn't commit.Since his release, Darryl served for two years as a legislative aide for the New York State Senate and as the Senior Property Manager at the Fifth Avenue Committee.


TAP: Web Feature: No "Justice," No Peace:. by Simon Rodberg. February 14, 2001.

www.prospect.org [cached]

Darryl King was the very model of a model inmate.While serving 25 years for murdering a police officer -- he continues to protest his innocence -- he earned a college degree, taught disabled inmates, opened a law library, and served as commander of his prison's chapter of the American Legion.

Since his 1995 release, King, 52, has also been the very model of a model ex-offender.He worked for a state senator, and then, for five years, as a property manager for the Fifth Avenue Committee, a Community Development Corporation (CDC) in his home borough of Brooklyn.
Many of the 600,000 Americans released from prison this year won't fare as well.Estimates of the national recidivism rate range from 32 percent to 60 percent, depending on the standard for counting.In New York, half of ex-offenders return to the state prison system.
King knows that some see him as a once and future criminal.At a national meeting for non-profit property managers the subject of ex-offenders came up.
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The other managers agreed that former inmates and their families were not welcome in their CDC's housing -- until King stood up and announced that they had an ex-convict in their midst.
King now runs Developing Justice in South Brooklyn, a program at the Fifth Avenue Committee that he argues can serve as a national model for reducing recidivism and helping ex-offenders.Criminal justice and community organizing experts are also optimistic.But their enthusiasm comes amid a growing sense of crisis: that if America doesn't figure out how to help all of its released prisoners, both the ex-offenders' lives, and the nationwide crime rate, may soon take a serious turn for the worse.
In one of the terrible ironies of America's punitive approach to crime control, recent efforts to get tougher on convicts have actually increased the likelihood of recidivism.America saw a 39 percent increase in parole revocations between 1990 and 1997.Cuts in prison rehabilitation programs mean that ex-offenders have fewer employment opportunities, and greater alienation, upon their release.
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"CDCs have a track record of solving problems in their communities and of getting the resources," says Mishi Faruqee, 30, who co-directs the program with Darryl King.In five months, 15 participants, all residents of South Brooklyn and all coming off at least a year in prison, have found their way to Developing Justice.They tend to be those who have neither other support networks nor an inclination to do more crime."There's a lot of ex-offenders that don't need our services," says King.Those who do set personal goals in areas like education, family relationships and mental health.
The most common goal, and the hardest struggle, can be the most elementary: finding a place to live.Public housing, in New York and elsewhere, is often closed to those with a criminal record, and staying with family members can cost them their apartments.Landlords mistrust tenants who lack credit histories and employment records, and as King found out, even non-profit developers are reluctant to rent to ex-offenders.One woman entered Developing Justice considering giving her three children up to foster care."I can live in the street," she told King, "but I can't bring my kids."Housing is, of course, the bread and butter of CDCs, and King and Faruqee have been able to find apartments for several participants in developments managed by the Fifth Avenue Committee.Similarly, the Committee runs two for-profit businesses that employ low-income residents -- a temp agency and an environmentally friendly laundromat -- and has coordinated job placement efforts for years.
Other goals are a little tougher.King describes one woman: "She was crying out, 'I can't seem to put my hand on this drug problem, I can't control it.I go back to what I know best.' I was there to help her make the phone call to the detox program."Developing Justice is building a base of resources, including treatment centers and professional counselors, to help the program participants.But sometimes life experience is, or has to be, enough."I get a call once a week from some family in desperate need of help," says King.
He could also serve as a different sort of role model.King was head of a prison chapter of the NAACP and works with a group of offenders-turned-activists.His community involvement is clearly a model for other ex-offenders.Among the personal goals that Developing Justice participants can choose is community organizing and leadership development."We want to try to show them that they have the ability to make a difference, with a pen, or with a march, or with a letter or phone campaign," says King, a critic of the current state of the criminal justice system.
But the Fifth Avenue Committee also works closely with various government agencies, including District Attorneys, police, and the jail system.
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Not every ex-offender will be another Darryl King.But if Developing Justice and similar organizations get their way, far fewer need become another criminal.

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