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Wrong Dana Hartley?

Dana Hartley

Biologist

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

HQ Phone:  (202) 208-3100

Direct Phone: (772) ***-**** ext. ***direct phone

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

1849 C Street, NW

Washington, D.C., District of Columbia,20240

United States

Company Description

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildli...more

Background Information

Employment History

Coordinator With the Administration

National Oceanic and Atmospheric


Northeast Regional Stranding Network Coordinator

National Marine Fisheries Service


Web References(27 Total References)


Captain Dana Banks | Broward Directory Blog

www.broward-directory.com [cached]

In a separate habitat restoration project in the area, officials are replacing invasive plant species with ones more typically found in hammock forests, said Dana Hartley, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist.


www.aasfe.org

Dana Hartley and three of her colleagues at the National Marine Fisheries Service filed into a dark office in Woods Hole to view a Coast Guard videotape of the whale.
Six months earlier, Hartley had taken over the job of coordinating the response to marine mammal strandings in the Northeast. Already, she had dealt with a mass stranding of common dolphins in Falmouth and a sperm whale stranding off Nantucket. The creature on the tape presented a new challenge. The whale's impressive size marked it as a likely fin whale, the second largest animal on earth, and the largest commonly found in New England waters. But as Hartley watched the videotape with her colleagues, all marine mammal experts, they noticed the whale's skin was mottled, an inky mix of blue and black. All four knew what this meant. No one said a word.Finally, Hartley broke the silence. "Just for kicks," she said, "let's see how many pleats a blue whale has. Blue whales have between 55 and 88 pleats, grooves that help the whale's throat balloon outward as it gulps large amounts of water during feeding. The next morning, March 6, Hartley showed the videotape to two other officials at the fisheries service, Phillip Clapham and Tim Cole, both experts at identifying whales. If Hartley and her colleagues were correct, the tanker had delivered to their doorstep a major scientific find, and an endangered species. That question and many others now confronted Dana Hartley, the marine mammal stranding coordinator. Hartley called the town of Middletown, which had hosted scientists in 1995 when an extremely rare right whale washed up on Second Beach. Once again town officials proved eager to help, summoning bulldozers to move the whale and police to protect it. The Coast Guard agreed to tow the blue whale. While Hartley worked the telephone arranging for the whale to be brought ashore, Phillip Clapham, a federal fishery biologist, worked in another office phoning any scientist who might be interested in a blue whale.


American Association of Sunday and Feature Editors - Mark Johnson

www.aasfe.org [cached]

Dana Hartley and three of her colleagues at the National Marine Fisheries Service filed into a dark office in Woods Hole to view a Coast Guard videotape of the whale.
Six months earlier, Hartley had taken over the job of coordinating the response to marine mammal strandings in the Northeast. Already, she had dealt with a mass stranding of common dolphins in Falmouth and a sperm whale stranding off Nantucket. The creature on the tape presented a new challenge. The whale's impressive size marked it as a likely fin whale, the second largest animal on earth, and the largest commonly found in New England waters. But as Hartley watched the videotape with her colleagues, all marine mammal experts, they noticed the whale's skin was mottled, an inky mix of blue and black. All four knew what this meant. No one said a word.Finally, Hartley broke the silence. "Just for kicks," she said, "let's see how many pleats a blue whale has." Blue whales have between 55 and 88 pleats, grooves that help the whale's throat balloon outward as it gulps large amounts of water during feeding. The next morning, March 6, Hartley showed the videotape to two other officials at the fisheries service, Phillip Clapham and Tim Cole, both experts at identifying whales. If Hartley and her colleagues were correct, the tanker had delivered to their doorstep a major scientific find, and an endangered species. That question and many others now confronted Dana Hartley, the marine mammal stranding coordinator. Hartley called the town of Middletown, which had hosted scientists in 1995 when an extremely rare right whale washed up on Second Beach. Once again town officials proved eager to help, summoning bulldozers to move the whale and police to protect it. The Coast Guard agreed to tow the blue whale. While Hartley worked the telephone arranging for the whale to be brought ashore, Phillip Clapham, a federal fishery biologist, worked in another office phoning any scientist who might be interested in a blue whale.


www.eagletribune.com

Hartley wrote her winning haiku "First Frost" in graduate school 17 years ago. "I woke up with the poem in my head," remembers Hartley, now a biologist, who dusted the verses off for this contest. Beverly's January O'Neil wrote her poem, "Night's Work" more recently, but found inspiration in her mother's work in a neonatal intensive care unit in Virginia more than 20 years ago.


www.salemnews.com

Hartley wrote her winning haiku "First Frost" in graduate school 17 years ago."I woke up with the poem in my head," remembers Hartley, now a biologist, who dusted the verses off for this contest. Beverly's January O'Neil wrote her poem, "Night's Work" more recently, but found inspiration in her mother's work in a neonatal intensive care unit in Virginia more than 20 years ago.


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