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2016-02-12T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Dan Simplicio?

Dan Simplicio Jr.

Lab Education Coordinator

Crow Canyon Archaeological Center

HQ Phone: (970) 565-8975

Crow Canyon Archaeological Center

23390 Road K

Cortez, Colorado 81321

United States

Company Description

Crow Canyon has been conducting nationally recognized archaeological research and public education programs since 1983. Nearly 3,000 fourth-through 12th-grade students participate in archaeological themed programs at the Center's campus every year. more

Find other employees at this company (93)

Background Information

Employment History

Consultant

Dan Simplicio Consulting

Affiliations

Member
Zuni Pueblo Council

Web References (63 Total References)


Dan Simplicio, cultural ...

www.durangoherald.com [cached]

Dan Simplicio, cultural specialist at the Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, will give a talk called What Happens When Migration Stops at 7 p.m. Thursday at Crow Canyon, 23390 Road K, Cortez.

After the emergence of the Zuni people at Ribbon Falls in the Grand Canyon, Simplicio says, they began migrating in search of the Middle Place.


Zuni archaeologist Dan ...

www.durangoherald.com [cached]

Zuni archaeologist Dan Simplicio, a cultural specialist at Crow Canyon, will show how archaeologists have traced the historical migration of the Zuni Pueblo and archaeological discoveries about the tribes past.


The training by Chimney Rock ...

www.durangoherald.com [cached]

The training by Chimney Rock Interpretive Association will feature two keynote speakers who are renowned scholars of archaeology and the Chacoan culture: Steve Lekson, curator of anthropology and professor of anthropology at the University of Colorado, Boulder; and Dan Simplicio, cultural specialist at Crow Canyon Archaeological Center.


Jim Mimiaga/Cortez Journal ...

www.cortezjournal.com [cached]

Jim Mimiaga/Cortez Journal Zuni artist Dan Simplicio specializes in turquoise jewelry.

...
Jim Mimiaga/Cortez Journal Zuni artist Dan Simplicio specializes in turquoise jewelry.
For the Zuni tribe, turquoise has deep cultural and artistic importance.
The minerals vibrant hues of blue, green, and aqua are used in ceremonies and to make stunning jewelry known around the world.
Dan Simplicio Jr., a Zuni artist and archaeologist who works for Crow Canyon, shared some of the backstory of the turquoise tradition during a presentation put on by the Hisatsinom Chapter last week.
Turquoise comes from the cooking of various elements of Mother Earth, he said, a process that is also a foundation of the Zuni way of life.
Our mindset is we are a raw-essence, and as we move through life we also become cooked, he said. Turquoise is a powerful element that stabilizes our lives.
Turquoise stones placed before a building is constructed are seen as roots for the structure. Simplicio adds that Zuni-style construction does not use scaffolding or levels, rather brick layers straddle the wall, moving backwards as they add hewed stones by eye.
The Zuni have ancestral ties to the Puebloan people who thrived in the Four Corners a millennia ago. At the Dillard site being excavated by Crow Canyon at Indian Camp Ranch, turquoise has been found.
It was probably used for ritual ceremonies because of the way it was shaped, Simplicio said. It is a very good find for the Basketmaker site there.
Simplicio is an accomplished jeweler specializing in turquoise set in silver. He learned the trade from his dad, Dan Simplicio Sr., a world renown turquoise and silversmithing artist who has passed on in 1970.
We only have four of his pieces, he said. One is valued at $60,000.


Jim Mimiaga/Cortez Journal ...

www.cortezjournal.com [cached]

Jim Mimiaga/Cortez Journal Zuni artist Dan Simplicio specializes in turquoise jewelry.

...
Jim Mimiaga/Cortez Journal Zuni artist Dan Simplicio specializes in turquoise jewelry.
For the Zuni tribe, turquoise has deep cultural and artistic importance.
The minerals vibrant hues of blue, green, and aqua are used in ceremonies and to make stunning jewelry known around the world.
Dan Simplicio Jr., a Zuni artist and archaeologist who works for Crow Canyon, shared some of the backstory of the turquoise tradition during a presentation put on by the Hisatsinom Chapter last week.
Turquoise comes from the cooking of various elements of Mother Earth, he said, a process that is also a foundation of the Zuni way of life.
Our mindset is we are a raw-essence, and as we move through life we also become cooked, he said. Turquoise is a powerful element that stabilizes our lives.
Turquoise stones placed before a building is constructed are seen as roots for the structure. Simplicio adds that Zuni-style construction does not use scaffolding or levels, rather brick layers straddle the wall, moving backwards as they add hewed stones by eye.
The Zuni have ancestral ties to the Puebloan people who thrived in the Four Corners a millennia ago. At the Dillard site being excavated by Crow Canyon at Indian Camp Ranch, turquoise has been found.
It was probably used for ritual ceremonies because of the way it was shaped, Simplicio said. It is a very good find for the Basketmaker site there.
Simplicio is an accomplished jeweler specializing in turquoise set in silver. He learned the trade from his dad, Dan Simplicio Sr., a world renown turquoise and silversmithing artist who has passed on in 1970.
We only have four of his pieces, he said. One is valued at $60,000.

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