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This profile was last updated on 6/12/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Wildlife Diversity Section Chief

Email: d***@***.us
Local Address: Montgomery, Pennsylvania, United States
Pennsylvania Game Commission
2001 Elmerton Avenue
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17110
United States

Company Description: The Pennsylvania Game Commission manages more than 35 percent of all public lands in Pennsylvania and is not subject to any state or legislative oversight. Bill...   more
Background

Employment History

Board Memberships and Affiliations

Education

  • BS , Biology
    Geneva College
  • MS
    Interdisciplinary Program
196 Total References
Web References
Network Directory | NatureServe
www.natureserve.org, 12 June 2014 [cached]
Daniel Brauning Pennsylvania Game Commission Wildlife Diversity Section Chief dbrauning@pa.gov 717-787-5529
Guest Speaker, Mr. Daniel ...
www.thebsp.org, 30 Nov 2012 [cached]
Guest Speaker, Mr. Daniel Brauning, Wildlife Diversity Chief Pennsylvania Game Commission, will present "The State of Pennsylvania's Birds." Picture Dan Brauning was born and raised within the city limits of Philadelphia. He had formative outdoor experience in the extensive park system of that city and on farms of extended family in Nebraska and Kansas. He is happily married to Marcia and father of the boys.Hobbies include mentoring growing sons, bird watching, ecotourism and gardening. He is active in his church. Dan received a BS in Biology from Geneva College, Beaver Falls PA in 1979 and then went on to receive a MS from the Interdisciplinary Program in Ecology, at Pennsylvania State University in 1982. His thesis was on nest-sites selection strategies of the American Kestrel. Prior to coming to Game Commission, Dan served as Project Coordinator of the first Pennsylvania Breeding Bird Atlas Project. He completed that effort as editor of the book, Atlas of the Breeding Birds in Pennsylvania (1992). In 2000 he co-authored, with Gerald McWilliams, "The Birds of Pennsylvania." Dan Brauning works with a strong team of biologist to plan and implement conservation of Pennsylvania birds and mammals. Joining the Pennsylvania Game Commission as Ornithologist in 1990, he now juggles the issues of bird and mammal research and management as the Chief of the Wildlife Diversity Program. Dan assists with a number of state and regional projects, including Project Director of the 2nd Pennsylvania Breeding Bird Atlas Project 2004-2009 and Co-Editor with Dr. Andy Wilson and Robert Mulvhill of the resulting book, the Second Atlas of Breeding Birds in Pennsylvania.2012.
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9am -10:30am- Conference Starts /Welcome and Announcements/ (Conference stage seating area.) Guest Speaker, Mr. Daniel Brauning, Wildlife Diversity Chief Pennsylvania Game Commission, will present: "The State of Pennsylvania Birds" 10:30am -11am Break - Visiting Vendors and Exhibits
Pennsylvania Game Commission: Feeding Birds in Your Backyard
www.gardening-sources.com, 22 Feb 2005 [cached]
"There's no secret to being successful at attracting birds to your yard," noted Dan Brauning, Pennsylvania Game Commission Wildlife Diversity Section supervisor.
...
"The power of food to draw songbirds in winter, especially when there's a crusted snow or icing, is remarkable," emphasized Brauning.
...
"Although it's fair to say that when buying feeders you get what you pay for, it's also important to point out that you can buy more than the birds need," Brauning said.
Pennsylvania Game Commission ...
www.sungazette.com, 1 June 2014 [cached]
Pennsylvania Game Commission Wildlife Diversity Chief Dan Brauning holds a peregrine falcon chick on the Tarentum Bridge on May 22.
...
The young male and female were in excellent condition and are about 35 days old, said Dan Brauning, wildlife diversity chief for the Game Commission.
Brauning and other commission biologists are fanning out across the state to band as many of the young peregrines in more than 40 nests to document their health and track their whereabouts.
Pittsburgh, Monaca
Earlier this week in the Pittsburgh area, Brauning and Keller banded five young peregrines in the Gulf Tower in Pittsburgh and four young at the Monaca East Rochester Bridge.
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The Tarentum birds could start to fly in five to 10 days, Brauning said.
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For example, when Brauning and Keller attempted to band peregrines on the Westinghouse Bridge on Tuesday, they didn't find young, but instead a female incubating three eggs.
...
Brauning was not surprised, as during his decades-long tenure, he has banded the Monaca female's mother and grandmother. "All were aggressive," he said.
The biologists use safety gear and hard hats and sometimes wield a broom as a baffle from the protective parents. "It's exciting," Brauning said.
"Wade Island is home to the ...
www.paenvironmentdigest.com, 18 June 2012 [cached]
"Wade Island is home to the state's largest nesting colony of black-crowned night-herons and great egrets, both of which are on Pennsylvania's endangered species list," said Dan Brauning, Game Commission Wildlife Diversity Section supervisor.
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"Unfortunately, there is a limited number of nesting sites on Wade Island," Brauning said.
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Brauning noted that extreme care is taken to not disturb the endangered species nesting on the island. Culling efforts will be stopped immediately if it is perceived that activities are threatening the nesting of egrets or herons.
To ensure public safety, the Game Commission has been providing law enforcement assistance or arranging for assistance from the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission throughout the operation. The equipment used is designed to reduce any risks and is used in the safest manner possible.
Brauning noted that studies have shown when nesting cormorants encroach upon colonies of other nesting birds, including both black-crowned night-herons and great egrets, they reduce the amount of nesting space for those other nesting species. In addition, cormorants have been known to take over egret nests and also kill trees as a result of their nesting activity. Several other cases found that cormorant droppings on the leaves and branches of nesting trees apparently caused egrets to abandon colonies.
Brauning stressed that culling a portion of the cormorants was not the first option explored, and has been used only twice. He noted that in 2004 and 2005, the agency attempted to encourage nesting by egrets and night-herons on neighboring islands. However, that effort was met with limited to no success.
"Trying to lure some of Wade Island's herons and egrets to a nearby island was unsuccessful," Brauning said.
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"The Game Commission is responsible for managing all of the Commonwealth's wildlife species," Brauning said.
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