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This profile was last updated on 11/29/10  and contains information from public web pages.

Mr. Cyrus I. Schofield

Wrong Cyrus I. Schofield?

Pastor

Phone: (503) ***-****  HQ Phone
Dallas Church
PO Box 462
Dallas, Oregon 97338
United States

Company Description: Dallas Church is a non-denominational, independent Christian church started October 21st 2007, in partnership with the CEA in Washington, East 91st Street Christian...   more
Background

Employment History

  • Teacher
    Y.M.C.A.
  • Lawyer, Politician

Board Memberships and Affiliations

  • Secretary
    St. Louis Y.M.C.A.
11 Total References
Web References
Mr. Trumbull's story of a successful ...
www.dividingword.net, 29 Nov 2010 [cached]
Mr. Trumbull's story of a successful law practice is in question since the Court Records of St. Louis show that at one point Cyrus badly needed a lawyer of his own.
...
According to the court records, Cyrus had signed a note for a $200 loan, which was to be repaid within sixty days.
...
After that, Simpson withdrew the action against Cyrus and Emeline, leaving Betts as the sole defendant with $219.30 owed--with the interest still accruing.
...
It seems probable that Cyrus forged her name. There was a hearing on May 6, 1879, but the papers noted, "Dismissed on motion of the plaintiff. There is no evidence that the man involved ever got his $900 or that Cyrus made any effort to pay.
...
According to the understanding in dispensational circles, Cyrus was by this time in the Kingdom and starting on the road to righteousness.
There is no evidence that Cyrus was a successful lawyer serving a respectable clientele. There were periods unaccounted for in his life at this time. It has been assumed that Leontine decided to leave Cyrus at the time and returned to Atchison.
...
Cyrus's role as husband and father had been irregular ever since he entered politics. Without regular employment and income, he wandered. As Trumbull tells it, he led the life of a bachelor.
...
According to the Scripture (1Ti 5:8), a man who does not provide for his own household is worse than an infidel, although that did not appear to phase Cyrus; he never made any effort to clean up the black marks on his record.
...
As late as November 6, though, Cyrus was still involved with a forgery charge, and that case's records do not agree with the picture of a new convert trying to right matters of the past. Of course, God forgives the past and changes a man into a new creature if he is really born again (2Co 5:17), but one expects to see a change of behavior. The details of Cyrus's conversion are not supported by public records, so we do not know the whole truth about the conversion of a man who has profoundly influenced the church.
As the forgery cases were being dismissed with unseemly haste and without fair settlement, Cyrus entered his new role as a worker at the Moody meetings. Of course, until 1879, Cyrus was close to illiterate in things Christian, so it is unclear what role he could have played in Moody's campaign.
...
While involved in Moody's campaign, which remained in St. Louis until April 1880, Cyrus avoided the reality of securing an income for himself or support for his family left in Atchison, Kansas. He paid his room rent, but sent very minimal amounts of money to his wife, and only occasionally.
After the Moody meetings, Cyrus became Acting Secretary of the St. Louis Y.M.C.A. in August 1880. If he still had a law practice, it did not intrude on his Y.M.C.A. duties.
In July 1880, Cyrus joined the Pilgrim Congregational Church of St. Louis.
...
On July 28, 1881, about the time Cyrus was licensed, Leontine Scofield had divorce papers drawn up, although case number 2161 was not filed until December 9,1881.
...
Leontine charged that Cyrus had absented himself, abandoned the family, and neglected his duties.
...
Cyrus never disclosed that he had a wife to his congregation; in fact, be gave them the impression that he was a bachelor.
...
Divorce papers deemed Cyrus unfit for custody of the children.
It is assumed that the character of a candidate for a pastorate would be carefully evaluated. No such evaluation could have been made by the church in Dallas, Texas. Converted for less than four years at the time, Cyrus had no theological training and limited formal schooling. He had been admitted to the Bar in Kansas, but had abused that privilege. He was separated from his Catholic wife and family without the benefit of a divorce.
...
CYRUS I. SCHOFIELD IN THE ROLE OF A CONGREGATIONAL MINISTER
"CYRUS I. SCHOFIELD, formerly of Kansas, late lawyer, politician and shyster generally has come to the surface again, and promises once more to gather around himself that halo of notoriety that has made him so prominent in the past. The last personal knowledge Kansans have had of this peer among scalawags was when about four years ago, after a series of forgeries and confidence games, he left the state and a destitute family and took refuge in Canada. For a time he kept undercover; nothing being heard of him until within the past two years when he turned up in St. Louis, where he had a wealthy widowed sister living who has generally come to the front and squared up Cyrus's little follies and foibles by paying good round sums of money. Within the past year, however, Cyrus committed a series of St. Louis forgeries that could not be settled so easily, and the erratic young man was compelled to linger in the St. Louis jail for a period of six months.
...
"In the latter part of his confinement, Schofield, under the administration of certain influences, became converted, or professedly so.
...
"It was known that Schofield was separated from his wife, but he had said that the incompatibility of his wife's temper and her religious zeal in the Catholic Church was such that he could not possibly live with her.
...
As soon as Mr. Schofield settles something on the children to aid me in supporting them and giving them an education, I will gladly give him the liberty he desires. I care not who he marries, or when, but I do want him to aid me in giving our little daughters the support and education they should have.'"
If the Dallas church officials had read the newspapers there might have been a different outcome to this story. The Scripture says, "Moreover he must have a good report of them which are without; lest he fall into reproach and the snare of the devil. (1Ti 3:7.)
Cyrus had a terrible report with the public but was on his way to take a pastorate. He seemed to arrive in Dallas with little luggage.
...
Cyrus began paying attention to Hettie.
...
Their marriage certificate is dated March 11, 1884, but Cyrus gave the date as July 14, 1884.
...
God seemed to bless Cyrus as his church grew numerically. After four years, the church was able to assume its own support. The American Home Missionary Society offered Cyrus the position of Superintendent for Louisiana and Texas. He accepted and served for many years. It meant that he would be absent from July to October to minister at Bible conferences. He also taught classes at the Y.M.C.A. and training classes for ministerial students.
...
It has a dispensational scheme quite similar to the one which Cyrus used later in the Scofield Reference Bible.
...
The Dallas church agreed to lengthy vacation periods so Cyrus could minister wherever called, carry on the Home Missionary Society work and speak at conferences. They wanted to keep him as their pastor, so they willingly let others fill in for the five months of the year during his absence.
...
In 1895, Moody's home church called Scofield to be its pastor for a year which meant Cyrus had to leave Dallas and sever connections with the Missionary Society.
...
In January 1896, Cyrus submitted his final report for his ministry in Dallas reviewing his fourteen years there. Membership had grown from 14 to 812. The active membership was 533. He sent the report from Northfield, where he was already at work.
...
In April 1897, Cyrus received word that Dr. James Brookes had died.
...
That played a role in Cyrus's later life.
CYRUS I. SCHOFIELD IN THE ...
prophecyforum.com, 2 May 2013 [cached]
CYRUS I. SCHOFIELD IN THE ROLE OF A CONGREGATIONAL MINISTER
" Cyrus I. Schofield, formerly of Kansas, late lawyer, politician and shyster generally, has come to the surface again, and promises once more to gather around himself that halo of notoriety that has made him so prominent in the past. The last personal knowledge that Kansans have had of this peer among scalawags, was when about four years ago, after a series of forgeries and confidence games he left the state and a destitute family and took refuge in Canada. For a time he kept undercover, nothing being heard of him until within the past two years when he turned up in St. Louis, where he had a wealthy widowed sister living who has generally come to the front and squared up Cyrus' little follies and foibles by paying good round sums of money. Within the past year, however, Cyrus committed a series of St. Louis forgeries that could not be settled so easily, and the erratic young gentleman was compelled to linger in the St. Louis jail for a period of six months.
Among the many malicious acts that characterized his career, was one peculiarly atrocious, that has come under our personal notice. Shortly after he left Kansas, leaving his wife and two children dependent upon the bounty of his wife's mother, he wrote his wife that he could invest some $1,300 of her mother's money, all she had, in a manner that would return big interest. After some correspondence he forwarded them a mortgage, signed and executed by one Chas.
ANALYZING Cyrus I. Scofield and His Teaching
www.gospeltruth.net, 6 Mar 2006 [cached]
Mr. Trumbull's story of a successful law practice is in question since the Court Records of St. Louis show that at one point Cyrus badly needed a lawyer of his own.
...
According to the court records, Cyrus had signed a note for a $200 loan, which was to be repaid within sixty days.
...
After that, Simpson withdrew the action against Cyrus and Emeline, leaving Betts as the sole defendant with $219.30 owed--with the interest still accruing.
...
It seems probable that Cyrus forged her name. There was a hearing on May 6, 1879, but the papers noted, "Dismissed on motion of the plaintiff. There is no evidence that the man involved ever got his $900 or that Cyrus made any effort to pay.
...
According to the understanding in dispensational circles, Cyrus was by this time in the Kingdom and starting on the road to righteousness.
There is no evidence that Cyrus was a successful lawyer serving a respectable clientele. There were periods unaccounted for in his life at this time. It has been assumed that Leontine decided to leave Cyrus at the time and returned to Atchison.
...
Cyrus's role as husband and father had been irregular ever since he entered politics. Without regular employment and income, he wandered. As Trumbull tells it, he led the life of a bachelor.
...
According to the Scripture (1Ti 5:8), a man who does not provide for his own household is worse than an infidel, although that did not appear to phase Cyrus; he never made any effort to clean up the black marks on his record.
...
As late as November 6, though, Cyrus was still involved with a forgery charge, and that case's records do not agree with the picture of a new convert trying to right matters of the past. Of course, God forgives the past and changes a man into a new creature if he is really born again (2Co 5:17), but one expects to see a change of behavior. The details of Cyrus's conversion are not supported by public records, so we do not know the whole truth about the conversion of a man who has profoundly influenced the church.
As the forgery cases were being dismissed with unseemly haste and without fair settlement, Cyrus entered his new role as a worker at the Moody meetings. Of course, until 1879, Cyrus was close to illiterate in things Christian, so it is unclear what role he could have played in Moody's campaign.
...
While involved in Moody's campaign, which remained in St. Louis until April 1880, Cyrus avoided the reality of securing an income for himself or support for his family left in Atchison, Kansas. He paid his room rent, but sent very minimal amounts of money to his wife, and only occasionally.
After the Moody meetings, Cyrus became Acting Secretary of the St. Louis Y.M.C.A. in August 1880. If he still had a law practice, it did not intrude on his Y.M.C.A. duties.
In July 1880, Cyrus joined the Pilgrim Congregational Church of St. Louis.
...
On July 28, 1881, about the time Cyrus was licensed, Leontine Scofield had divorce papers drawn up, although case number 2161 was not filed until December 9,1881.
...
Leontine charged that Cyrus had absented himself, abandoned the family, and neglected his duties.
...
Cyrus never disclosed that he had a wife to his congregation; in fact, be gave them the impression that he was a bachelor.
...
Divorce papers deemed Cyrus unfit for custody of the children.
It is assumed that the character of a candidate for a pastorate would be carefully evaluated. No such evaluation could have been made by the church in Dallas, Texas. Converted for less than four years at the time, Cyrus had no theological training and limited formal schooling. He had been admitted to the Bar in Kansas, but had abused that privilege. He was separated from his Catholic wife and family without the benefit of a divorce.
...
CYRUS I. SCHOFIELD IN THE ROLE OF A CONGREGATIONAL MINISTER
"CYRUS I. SCHOFIELD, formerly of Kansas, late lawyer, politician and shyster generally has come to the surface again, and promises once more to gather around himself that halo of notoriety that has made him so prominent in the past. The last personal knowledge Kansans have had of this peer among scalawags was when about four years ago, after a series of forgeries and confidence games, he left the state and a destitute family and took refuge in Canada. For a time he kept undercover; nothing being heard of him until within the past two years when he turned up in St. Louis, where he had a wealthy widowed sister living who has generally come to the front and squared up Cyrus's little follies and foibles by paying good round sums of money. Within the past year, however, Cyrus committed a series of St. Louis forgeries that could not be settled so easily, and the erratic young man was compelled to linger in the St. Louis jail for a period of six months.
...
"In the latter part of his confinement, Schofield, under the administration of certain influences, became converted, or professedly so.
...
"It was known that Schofield was separated from his wife, but he had said that the incompatibility of his wife's temper and her religious zeal in the Catholic Church was such that he could not possibly live with her.
...
As soon as Mr. Schofield settles something on the children to aid me in supporting them and giving them an education, I will gladly give him the liberty he desires. I care not who he marries, or when, but I do want him to aid me in giving our little daughters the support and education they should have.'"
If the Dallas church officials had read the newspapers there might have been a different outcome to this story. The Scripture says, "Moreover he must have a good report of them which are without; lest he fall into reproach and the snare of the devil. (1Ti 3:7.)
Cyrus had a terrible report with the public but was on his way to take a pastorate. He seemed to arrive in Dallas with little luggage.
...
Cyrus began paying attention to Hettie.
...
Their marriage certificate is dated March 11, 1884, but Cyrus gave the date as July 14, 1884.
...
God seemed to bless Cyrus as his church grew numerically. After four years, the church was able to assume its own support. The American Home Missionary Society offered Cyrus the position of Superintendent for Louisiana and Texas. He accepted and served for many years. It meant that he would be absent from July to October to minister at Bible conferences. He also taught classes at the Y.M.C.A. and training classes for ministerial students.
...
It has a dispensational scheme quite similar to the one which Cyrus used later in the Scofield Reference Bible.
...
The Dallas church agreed to lengthy vacation periods so Cyrus could minister wherever called, carry on the Home Missionary Society work and speak at conferences. They wanted to keep him as their pastor, so they willingly let others fill in for the five months of the year during his absence.
...
In 1895, Moody's home church called Scofield to be its pastor for a year which meant Cyrus had to leave Dallas and sever connections with the Missionary Society.
...
In January 1896, Cyrus submitted his final report for his ministry in Dallas reviewing his fourteen years there. Membership had grown from 14 to 812. The active membership was 533. He sent the report from Northfield, where he was already at work.
...
In April 1897, Cyrus received word that Dr. James Brookes had died.
...
That played a role in Cyrus's later life.
CYRUS I. SCHOFIELD IN THE ROLE ...
prophecyforum.com [cached]
CYRUS I. SCHOFIELD IN THE ROLE OF A CONGREGATIONAL MINISTER
" Cyrus I. Schofield, formerly of Kansas, late lawyer, politician and shyster generally, has come to the surface again, and promises once more to gather around himself that halo of notoriety that has made him so prominent in the past. The last personal knowledge that Kansans have had of this peer among scalawags, was when about four years ago, after a series of forgeries and confidence games he left the state and a destitute family and took refuge in Canada. For a time he kept undercover, nothing being heard of him until within the past two years when he turned up in St. Louis, where he had a wealthy widowed sister living who has generally come to the front and squared up Cyrus' little follies and foibles by paying good round sums of money. Within the past year, however, Cyrus committed a series of St. Louis forgeries that could not be settled so easily, and the erratic young gentleman was compelled to linger in the St. Louis jail for a period of six months.
Among the many malicious acts that characterized his career, was one peculiarly atrocious, that has come under our personal notice. Shortly after he left Kansas, leaving his wife and two children dependent upon the bounty of his wife's mother, he wrote his wife that he could invest some $1,300 of her mother's money, all she had, in a manner that would return big interest. After some correspondence he forwarded them a mortgage, signed and executed by one Chas.
Christ The Way Fundamental Christian Bookstore: A Witness To The World With The Word of God!
www.christtheway.ca, 10 Jan 2011 [cached]
One of the most colorful U.S. Attorneys for the District of Kansas was Cyrus I. Schofield (1873). He was forced to resign from that position due to questionable financial transactions, and shortly thereafter found himself jailed in St. Louis on forgery charges. [sic]
...
CYRUS I. SCHOFIELD IN THE ROLE OF A CONGREGATIONAL MINISTER
"Cyrus I. Schofield, formerly of Kansas, late lawyer, politician and shyster generally, has come to the surface again, and promises once more to gather around himself that halo of notoriety that has made him so prominent in the past. The last personal knowledge that Kansans have had of this peer among scalawags, was when about four years ago, after a series of forgeries and confidence games he left the state and a destitute family and took refuge in Canada. For a time he kept undercover, nothing being heard of him until within the past two years when he turned up in St. Louis, where he had a wealthy widowed sister living who has generally come to the front and squared up Cyrus' little follies and foibles by paying good round sums of money. Within the past year, however, Cyrus committed a series of St. Louis forgeries that could not be settled so easily, and the erratic young gentleman was compelled to linger in the St. Louis jail for a period of six months.
Among the many malicious acts that characterized his career, was one peculiarly atrocious, that has come under our personal notice. Shortly after he left Kansas, leaving his wife and two children dependent upon the bounty of his wife's mother, he wrote his wife that he could invest some $1,300 of her mother's money, all she had, in a manner that would return big interest. After some correspondence he forwarded them a mortgage, signed and executed by one Chas.
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