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Wrong Gottfried Schlaug?

Gottfried Schlaug

Neurologist

Harvard University

Direct Phone: (617) ***-****direct phone

Email: g***@***.edu

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Harvard University

12 Oxford St. # 373

Cambridge, Massachusetts,02138

United States

Company Description

The Harvard Art Museums, among the world's leading art institutions, comprise three museums (Fogg, Busch-Reisinger, and Arthur M. Sackler) and four research centers (Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies, the Center for the Technical Study of ...more

Web References(199 Total References)


Dr. Nesim Halyo And "The Effects of Music On Exercise" - April 2010 | Teaching Math And Science With Music - Dr. Madeline Frank

www.madelinefrankviola.com [cached]

Dr. Gottfried Schlaug, a Harvard University neurologist says, "Music might provide an alternative entry point to the brain, because it can unlock so many different doors into an injured or ill brain.


Welcome to Jackson Music Forum

www.jacksonmusicforum.com [cached]

"Music might provide an alternative entry point" to the brain, because it can unlock so many different doors into an injured or ill brain, said Dr. Gottfried Schlaug, a Harvard University neurologist.
Pitch, harmony, melody, rhythm and emotion - all components of music - engage different regions of the brain. And many of those same regions are also important in speech, movement and social interaction. If a disease or trauma has disabled a brain region needed for such functions, music can sometimes get in through a back door and coax them out by another route, Schlaug says. "In a sense, we're using musical tools to particularly engage certain parts of the brain and then teach the brain new tricks - new tools - to overcome an impairment," he says. Neuroscientists are exploring the role of music in treatment of some of the following: Speech: For about 1 in 5 patients who suffer a stroke, difficulty with speech - aphasia - is a lingering effect. Schlaug and other researchers have found that by practicing to express themselves with a simple form of singing - something that sounds almost like Gregorian chant - aphasic stroke victims significantly improved the fluency of their speech compared with patients whose speech therapy did not include singing. Schlaug says it appears that the "melodic intonation therapy," as it's termed, bypassed the stroke damage done to speech centers in aphasic patients' left brain hemisphere. "It works well and it works instantaneously, and it's hard to think of any medication that has this effect," Schlaug says.


Sourcetone

www.sourcetone.com [cached]

Dr. Gottfried Schlaug, M.D., Ph.D., Principal Investigator at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and Harvard Medical School.
Sourcetone Grant on the Integrated Areas of Digitial Sound/Music, Human Behavior, and Brain Function. Dr. Schlaug presently serves as the Director of the Music and Neuroimaging Laboratory, Chief of the Division of Cerebrovascular Disease, and Director of Neuroimaging and Stroke Recovery at BIDMC. He is an Associate Professor of Neurology with major research interests that include the neurobiology of music, neuroplasticity of musicians, and innovations in singing and music to facilitate recovery from brain injuries or neurodevelopmental disorders. Dr. Schlaug has written over 125 peer-reviewed papers and book chapters in his area of expertise. Dr. Schlaug's research team includes musicians, neurobiologists and cognitive neuroscientists among them Dr. Psyche Loui, Dr. Marc Bangert, Justin Bachorik, and Charles Li.


Editorial Team

ojs.vre.upei.ca [cached]

Gottfried Schlaug, Harvard Medical School, United States


The power of music | World Peace Through Technology

peacetour.org [cached]

"Music might provide an alternative entry point to the brain, because it can unlock so many different doors into an injured or ill brain," said Dr. Gottfried Schlaug, a Harvard University neurologist.
Pitch, harmony, melody, rhythm, and emotion (all components of music) engage different regions of the brain, and many of those same regions are also important in speech, movement, and social interaction. If a disease or trauma has disabled a brain region needed for such functions, music can sometimes get in through a back door and coax them out by another route. "In a sense, we're using musical tools to particularly engage certain parts of the brain and then teach the brain new tricks, new tools, to overcome an impairment," says Schlaug.


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