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Colleen Mikki Breese

Wrong Colleen Mikki Breese?
 
Background

Employment History

Education

  • PhD , English literature
9 Total References
Web References
Much had been made earlier of ...
www.dorothyparker.com, 1 Jan 2007 [cached]
Much had been made earlier of a statement by Colleen Breese, the Midwestern professor who edited Complete Poems, that she literally bought a copy of NMF, cut out the pages, Austin, Texas, Memphis, Tennessee, and pasted them onto sheets of paper and photocopied them all for the chapter in Complete Poems.
Mickus went over the production of ...
www.dorothyparker.com [cached]
Mickus went over the production of Complete Poems, and how Breese and Millman used Not Much Fun as the basis for a large portion of the book.
...
Like the other Parker scholar, Colleen Breese, he also taught writing and composition.
...
Picking up the testimony where the tape stopped on Friday, Breese was shown her contract with Penguin, signed by Kathryn Court.
...
Breese did not know she was the publisher. She also was shown a letter she sent to Michael Millman, the ex-editor who testified Friday that he oversaw the project. Breese said in the letter that she thought a book that compiled all of Parker's poems was a good project to follow Complete Stories, which she also had edited. She was asked where the idea came from for the book.
...
Breese said that she was never given Silverstein's manuscript, which he gave to Penguin in 1994 and they turned down. She said she wasn't sent it, and was not aware that Penguin had made a previous offer to him.
Breese said she purchased a copy of Not Much Fun, and she did see Silverstein's copyright notice. However, she believed this only covered his introduction to the book, because "he can't copyright Dorothy Parker's poems, just the introduction.
...
The production of Complete Poems was an exercise in using a copy machine for Breese.
...
Breese gave a brief history of her involvement with Dorothy Parker.
...
Breese sent the stack of copies off to New York to Millman.
...
At this, Breese perked up as if she was back in the classroom. She said this was something she used to discuss with her students.
...
Breese was dismissive of that.
"I used his book as a source to make clear photocopies," was how she termed the task of assembling Not Much Fun. Breese was shown her dissertation, and page upon page of copies that were used for her bibliography, primary and secondary sources. She said she read all of Parker's work and all criticism of the work.
For the next two hours of the tape, the attorneys reviewed with Breese the work she did on Complete Poems. Time after time, it was shown that she did indeed photocopy NMF, warts and all.
...
"Whomever they got as a copy editor at Penguin" should have gone line by line to check the poems, because Breese didn't think she should have had to. She did not look at the original source of the materials. "I made Xerox copies from Not Much Fun," she said. The plaintiff's attorneys read Parker poems from the original sources and then compared them to what Breese used in Complete Poems. This was very tedious as they talked about Emdashes, capitalization, and line breaks. r /> "Line by line? Breese asked. "No. I did not do any copyediting in Complete Poems."
After Complete Poems was published in early 1999, Michael Millman sent about five complimentary copies to Breese, with a nice note.
...
Breese was never told if the book was a success or not, and sales figures were never shared with her.
...
Midwestern college instructor Colleen "Mikki" Breese came to his attention, as her testimony revealed in Day Three, sometime in 1993, around the time of the centenary of Parker's birth.
...
The timeline of events showed that Millman mailed Breese a copy of "Not Much Fun" when his 2001 deposition was read back to him.
...
Millman's correspondence with Breese was read back to him, which shows he brought up NMF with her. Breese then photocopied the pages of NMF to use for Complete Poems.
...
Breese then sent the manuscript for Complete Poems to Mil
...
Letters from 1995 to 1996 were introduced that show Millman and Breese were working on Complete Poems, and that the NAACP had agreed to a contract to publish it.
...
After watching Breese on the monitor for a few hours now, she is beginning to be a more sympathetic character to me. She looks like my grandmother, taking her reading glasses off and then putting them back on. Breese did not think she was doing anything wrong when she photocopied Parker stories and poems over the years of teaching. She just wanted Parker books to use in her classroom, and, lo and behold, an editor at Penguin said she could have her wish. It must have been exciting for her, a part-time instructor at a small college in Ohio, to be getting faxes and packages sent to her from a prestigious New York City publishing house to the English department offices of her college.
...
Breese said that when Penguin flew her to New York to give her deposition, the company put her up at the Soho Grand Hotel. So Penguin spent more on her hotel bill than they did on Breese's fee to edit their book. At one point on the tape, when she said she was no longer at Toledo University, Breese said she didn't have an office any more. She looked pretty sad to say it, as if she missed university life.
When the DVD fired up again, Breese said that while using photocopied material, it was always a problem to get clear copies, there was an "interest in clarity" to consider. Rather than use second or third generation copies, she wanted to use a clean book: NMF. Breese did not do what Silverstein did, go to microfilm to locate Parker's poems and verses, she said, because copies from microfilm "are muddy or have spots" and that "none of them are really good.
...
Breese was not asked and did not say that she actually owned any Parker books to make her photocopies from.
Next came the line of questions I was waiting to hear, about when she learned she might be in hot water for editing Complete Poems. She said she did not learn that Silverstein had sent a demand letter claiming copyright infringement to Penguin. Breese said she became aware of the sticky issue much later. "My knowledge begins in May 2001," she said firmly. Her claim was that during the months Silverstein was asking Penguin for documents, Penguin did not contact her about it. However, in the responses to Silverstein that were sent from Penguin before the lawsuit began, Breese was mentioned, as if she had a hand in helping Penguin explain herself.
The trial is also showing what a neophyte to publishing that Breese was. How Penguin could use someone of this caliber to edit one of its most important authors is almost unfathomable. Breese said she did not know what line editors do. That was explained to her.
...
Breese said Complete Poems started when Millman called her.
...
We watched the beginning of a video deposition taken in December 2001 from Colleen "Mikki" Breese, a former instructor at the University of Toledo. Breese was the freelance editor who edited for Penguin two books: Dorothy Parker Complete Stories (1995) and Dorothy Parker Complete Poems (1999). The back-story of how Breese, a part-time instructor at a state college in northern Ohio, came to edit two of the most important books on Penguin's backlist, is a quirky little tale of Xerox machines and phone calls.
Breese said she earned all of her undergraduate and graduate degrees at UT. She also earned her PhD in English literature in Toledo, and taught writing, literature, women's literature, and women's history, from 1989-2000. At the time of the deposition, she was a public school substitute teacher in suburban Ohio.
How she came to the attention of Penguin editors in New York City was via U.S. Mail. In her deposition, she said that she taught a course on Dorothy Parker, and routinely photocopied Parker's works to use in class. "As a teacher it was difficult finding material," she said. "I was going to Kinko's making copies all the time… I thought it was time… I thought (a book) was needed. Breese said she wrote a "To whom it may concern" letter and mailed it to the Viking Press in New York. (Viking was subsumed by Penguin years ago; Viking had published Parker's books since before World War II. Breese would have been familiar with Viking if she had any of the old Portable Dorothy Parker books, that were part of the V
The freelance editor the company got ...
dorothyparker.com [cached]
The freelance editor the company got (for its $2,000) was Colleen Breese, who had about as much credibility as Silverstein at the time.
...
Breese did not have a problem taking the $2,000 to photocopy the rest of the Parker canon - Silverstein's book.
...
Watching the video of Breese and Calhoun sit uncomfortably as the big city lawyers grilled them can only be described as sad.
...
In the trial, it came out that Penguin's editor, freelancer Colleen Breese, had photocopied Not Much Fun.
...
Mickus went over the production of Complete Poems, and how Breese and Millman used Not Much Fun as the basis for a large portion of the book.
...
Like the other Parker scholar, Colleen Breese, he also taught writing and composition.
...
Picking up the testimony where the tape stopped on Friday, Breese was shown her contract with Penguin, signed by Kathryn Court.
...
Breese did not know she was the publisher. She also was shown a letter she sent to Michael Millman, the ex-editor who testified Friday that he oversaw the project. Breese said in the letter that she thought a book that compiled all of Parker's poems was a good project to follow Complete Stories, which she also had edited. She was asked where the idea came from for the book.
...
Breese said that she was never given Silverstein's manuscript, which he gave to Penguin in 1994 and they turned down. She said she wasn't sent it, and was not aware that Penguin had made a previous offer to him.
Breese said she purchased a copy of Not Much Fun, and she did see Silverstein's copyright notice. However, she believed this only covered his introduction to the book, because "he can't copyright Dorothy Parker's poems, just the introduction.
...
The production of Complete Poems was an exercise in using a copy machine for Breese.
...
Breese gave a brief history of her involvement with Dorothy Parker.
...
Breese sent the stack of copies off to New York to Millman.
...
At this, Breese perked up as if she was back in the classroom. She said this was something she used to discuss with her students.
...
Breese was dismissive of that.
"I used his book as a source to make clear photocopies," was how she termed the task of assembling Not Much Fun. Breese was shown her dissertation, and page upon page of copies that were used for her bibliography, primary and secondary sources. She said she read all of Parker's work and all criticism of the work.
For the next two hours of the tape, the attorneys reviewed with Breese the work she did on Complete Poems. Time after time, it was shown that she did indeed photocopy NMF, warts and all.
...
"Whomever they got as a copy editor at Penguin" should have gone line by line to check the poems, because Breese didn't think she should have had to. She did not look at the original source of the materials. "I made Xerox copies from Not Much Fun," she said. The plaintiff's attorneys read Parker poems from the original sources and then compared them to what Breese used in Complete Poems. This was very tedious as they talked about Emdashes, capitalization, and line breaks.
"Line by line? Breese asked. "No. I did not do any copyediting in Complete Poems."
After Complete Poems was published in early 1999, Michael Millman sent about five complimentary copies to Breese, with a nice note.
...
Breese was never told if the book was a success or not, and sales figures were never shared with her.
...
Midwestern college instructor Colleen "Mikki" Breese came to his attention, as her testimony revealed in Day Three, sometime in 1993, around the time of the centenary of Parker's birth.
...
The timeline of events showed that Millman mailed Breese a copy of "Not Much Fun" when his 2001 deposition was read back to him.
...
Millman's correspondence with Breese was read back to him, which shows he brought up NMF with her. Breese then photocopied the pages of NMF to use for Complete Poems.
...
Breese then sent the manuscript for Complete Poems to Millman, who ultimately sent it to the production department.
...
Letters from 1995 to 1996 were introduced that show Millman and Breese were working on Complete Poems, and that the NAACP had agreed to a contract to publish it.
...
After watching Breese on the monitor for a few hours now, she is beginning to be a more sympathetic character to me. She looks like my grandmother, taking her reading glasses off and then putting them back on. Breese did not think she was doing anything wrong when she photocopied Parker stories and poems over the years of teaching. She just wanted Parker books to use in her classroom, and, lo and behold, an editor at Penguin said she could have her wish. It must have been exciting for her, a part-time instructor at a small college in Ohio, to be getting faxes and packages sent to her from a prestigious New York City publishing house to the English department offices of her college.
...
Breese said that when Penguin flew her to New York to give her deposition, the company put her up at the Soho Grand Hotel. So Penguin spent more on her hotel bill than they did on Breese's fee to edit their book. At one point on the tape, when she said she was no longer at Toledo University, Breese said she didn't have an office any more. She looked pretty sad to say it, as if she missed university life.
When the DVD fired up again, Breese said that while using photocopied material, it was always a problem to get clear copies, there was an "interest in clarity" to consider. Rather than use second or third generation copies, she wanted to use a clean book: NMF. Breese did not do what Silverstein did, go to microfilm to locate Parker's poems and verses, she said, because copies from microfilm "are muddy or have spots" and that "none of them are really good.
...
Breese was not asked and did not say that she actually owned any Parker books to make her photocopies from.
Next came the line of questions I was waiting to hear, about when she learned she might be in hot water for editing Complete Poems. She said she did not learn that Silverstein had sent a demand letter claiming copyright infringement to Penguin. Breese said she became aware of the sticky issue much later. "My knowledge begins in May 2001," she said firmly. Her claim was that during the months Silverstein was asking Penguin for documents, Penguin did not contact her about it. However, in the responses to Silverstein that were sent from Penguin before the lawsuit began, Breese was mentioned, as if she had a hand in helping Penguin explain herself.
The trial is also showing what a neophyte to publishing that Breese was. How Penguin could use someone of this caliber to edit one of its most important authors is almost unfathomable. Breese said she did not know what line editors do. That was explained to her.
...
Breese said Complete Poems started when Millman called her.
...
We watched the beginning of a video deposition taken in December 2001 from Colleen "Mikki" Breese, a former instructor at the University of Toledo. Breese was the freelance editor who edited for Penguin two books: Dorothy Parker Complete Stories (1995) and Dorothy Parker Complete Poems (1999). The back-story of how Breese, a part-time instructor at a state college in northern Ohio, came to edit two of the most important books on Penguin's backlist, is a quirky little tale of Xerox machines and phone calls.
Breese said she earned all of her undergraduate and graduate degrees at UT. She also earned her PhD in English literature in Toledo, and taught writing, literature, women's literature, and women's history, from 1989-2000. At the time of the deposition, she was a public school substitute teacher in suburban Ohio.
How she came to the attention of Penguin editors in New York City was via U.S. Mail. In her deposition, <
Dorothy Parker Society
dorothyparker.com [cached]
Mickus went over the production of Complete Poems, and how Breese and Millman used Not Much Fun as the basis for a large portion of the book.
...
Picking up the testimony where the tape stopped on Friday, Breese was shown her contract with Penguin, signed by Kathryn Court.
...
Breese did not know she was the publisher. She also was shown a letter she sent to Michael Millman, the ex-editor who testified Friday that he oversaw the project. Breese said in the letter that she thought a book that compiled all of Parker's poems was a good project to follow Complete Stories, which she also had edited. She was asked where the idea came from for the book.
...
Breese said that she was never given Silverstein's manuscript, which he gave to Penguin in 1994 and they turned down. She said she wasn't sent it, and was not aware that Penguin had made a previous offer to him.
Breese said she purchased a copy of Not Much Fun, and she did see Silverstein's copyright notice. However, she believed this only covered his introduction to the book, because "he can't copyright Dorothy Parker's poems, just the introduction.
...
The production of Complete Poems was an exercise in using a copy machine for Breese.
...
Breese gave a brief history of her involvement with Dorothy Parker.
...
Breese sent the stack of copies off to New York to Millman.
...
At this, Breese perked up as if she was back in the classroom. She said this was something she used to discuss with her students.
...
Breese was dismissive of that.
"I used his book as a source to make clear photocopies," was how she termed the task of assembling Not Much Fun. Breese was shown her dissertation, and page upon page of copies that were used for her bibliography, primary and secondary sources. She said she read all of Parker's work and all criticism of the work.
For the next two hours of the tape, the attorneys reviewed with Breese the work she did on Complete Poems. Time after time, it was shown that she did indeed photocopy NMF, warts and all. Even where Silverstein goofed, she copied that too. In the poem "Oh Look -- I Can Do It, Too" he dropped an entire line from the poem. In Complete Poems, that line is missing as well. Did she mean to leave it out, she was asked rhetorically. "No," she said, "and I didn't think he had either."
"I didn't see that as my job," she said. "Whomever they got as a copy editor at Penguin" should have gone line by line to check the poems, because Breese didn't think she should have had to. She did not look at the original source of the materials.
...
Breese asked. "No. I did not do any copyediting in Complete Poems."
After Complete Poems was published in early 1999, Michael Millman sent about five complimentary copies to Breese, with a nice note.
...
Breese was never told if the book was a success or not, and sales figures were never shared with her.
...
Midwestern college instructor Colleen "Mikki" Breese came to his attention, as her testimony revealed in Day Three, sometime in 1993, around the time of the centenary of Parker's birth.
...
The timeline of events showed that Millman mailed Breese a copy of "Not Much Fun" when his 2001 deposition was read back to him.
...
Millman's correspondence with Breese was read back to him, which shows he brought up NMF with her.
...
Breese then photocopied the pages of NMF to use for Complete Poems.
...
Breese then sent the manuscript for Complete Poems to Millman, who ultimately sent it to the production department.
...
Letters from 1995 to 1996 were introduced that show Millman and Breese were working on Complete Poems, and that the NAACP had agreed to a contract to publish it.
...
After watching Breese on the monitor for a few hours now, she is beginning to be a more sympathetic character to me. She looks like my grandmother, taking her reading glasses off and then putting them back on. Breese did not think she was doing anything wrong when she photocopied Parker stories and poems over the years of teaching. She just wanted Parker books to use in her classroom, and, lo and behold, an editor at Penguin said she could have her wish. It must have been exciting for her, a part-time instructor at a small college in Ohio, to be getting faxes and packages sent to her from a prestigious New York City publishing house to the English department offices of her college.
...
Breese said that when Penguin flew her to New York to give her deposition, the company put her up at the Soho Grand Hotel.
...
When the DVD fired up again, Breese said that while using photocopied material, it was always a problem to get clear copies, there was an "interest in clarity" to consider. Rather than use second or third generation copies, she wanted to use a clean book: NMF. Breese did not do what Silverstein did, go to microfilm to locate Parker's poems and verses, she said, because copies from microfilm "are muddy or have spots" and that "none of them are really good.
...
Breese was not asked and did not say that she actually owned any Parker books to make her photocopies from.
Next came the line of questions I was waiting to hear, about when she learned she might be in hot water for editing Complete Poems. She said she did not learn that Silverstein had sent a demand letter claiming copyright infringement to Penguin. Breese said she became aware of the sticky issue much later. "My knowledge begins in May 2001," she said firmly. Her claim was that during the months Silverstein was asking Penguin for documents, Penguin did not contact her about it. However, in the responses to Silverstein that were sent from Penguin before the lawsuit began, Breese was mentioned, as if she had a hand in helping Penguin explain herself.
The trial is also showing what a neophyte to publishing that Breese was. How Penguin could use someone of this caliber to edit one of its most important authors is almost unfathomable. Breese said she did not know what line editors do. That was explained to her.
...
Breese said Complete Poems started when Millman called her.
...
We watched the beginning of a video deposition taken in December 2001 from Colleen "Mikki" Breese, a former instructor at the University of Toledo. Breese was the freelance editor who edited for Penguin two books: Dorothy Parker Complete Stories (1995) and Dorothy Parker Complete Poems (1999). The back-story of how Breese, a part-time instructor at a state college in northern Ohio, came to edit two of the most important books on Penguin's backlist, is a quirky little tale of Xerox machines and phone calls.
Breese said she earned all of her undergraduate and graduate degrees at UT. She also earned her PhD in English literature in Toledo, and taught writing, literature, women's literature, and women's history, from 1989-2000. At the time of the deposition, she was a public school substitute teacher in suburban Ohio.
How she came to the attention of Penguin editors in New York City was via U.S. Mail. In her deposition, she said that she taught a course on Dorothy Parker, and routinely photocopied Parker's works to use in class. "As a teacher it was difficult finding material," she said. "I was going to Kinko's making copies all the time… I thought it was time… I thought (a book) was needed. Breese said she wrote a "To whom it may concern" letter and mailed it to the Viking Press in New York. (Viking was subsumed by Penguin years ago; Viking had published Parker's books since before World War II.
...
The next step is amazing: Penguin Senior Editor Michael Millman replied to Breese, saying in effect that the company would like to publish new compilations of Dorothy Parker material.
...
By coincidence, Breese already had photocopies of all of Parker's work.
...
The plaintiffs shifted gears with Breese at this point; it appears they are moving onto her work on Complete Poems.
...
Soon Penguin's lead attorney, Alex Gigante, contacted her and told Breese what the c
legal | BUY Chloramphenicol ONLINE NO PRESCRIPTION
www.dorothyparker.com, 1 May 2001 [cached]
The freelance editor the company got (for its $2,000) was Colleen Breese, who had about as much credibility as Silverstein at the time.
...
Breese did not have a problem taking the $2,000 to photocopy the rest of the Parker canon - Silverstein's book.
...
Watching the video of Breese and Calhoun sit uncomfortably as the big city lawyers grilled them can only be described as sad, BUY Tylenol ONLINE NO PRESCRIPTION.
...
In the trial, it came out that Penguin's editor, freelancer Colleen Breese, had photocopied Not Much Fun, BUY Silagra ONLINE NO PRESCRIPTION.
...
Mickus went over the production of Complete Poems, and how Breese and Millman used Not Much Fun as the basis for a large portion of the book.
...
Like the other Parker scholar, Colleen Breese, he also taught writing and composition.
...
Picking up the testimony where the tape stopped on Friday, Buy cheap Calan no rx, Breese was shown her contract with Penguin, signed by Kathryn Court.
...
Breese did not know she was the publisher, BUY Calan ONLINE NO PRESCRIPTION. She also was shown a letter she sent to Michael Millman, the ex-editor who testified Friday that he oversaw the project. Breese said in the letter that she thought a book that compiled all of Parker's poems was a good project to follow Complete Stories, which she also had edited. She was asked where the idea came from for the book, buy Calan without a prescription.
...
Breese said that she was never given Silverstein's manuscript, which he gave to Penguin in 1994 and they turned down. She said she wasn't sent it, and was not aware that Penguin had made a previous offer to him.
Breese said she purchased a copy of Not Much Fun, and she did see Silverstein's copyright notice. However, she believed this only covered his introduction to the book, Calan from canadian pharmacy, because "he can't copyright Dorothy Parker's poems, just the introduction.
...
The production of Complete Poems was an exercise in using a copy machine for Breese.
...
Breese gave a brief history of her involvement with Dorothy Parker.
...
Breese sent the stack of copies off to New York to Millman.
...
At this, online buy Calan without a prescription, Breese perked up as if she was back in the classroom. She said this was something she used to discuss with her students, BUY Calan ONLINE NO PRESCRIPTION.
...
Breese was dismissive of that.
"I used his book as a source to make clear photocopies," was how she termed the task of assembling Not Much Fun. Breese was shown her dissertation, Calan 1000mg, 2000mg, and page upon page of copies that were used for her bibliography, primary and secondary sources. She said she read all of Parker's work and all criticism of the work.
For the next two hours of the tape, the attorneys reviewed with Breese the work she did on Complete Poems. Time after time, it was shown that she did indeed photocopy NMF, warts and all, BUY Calan ONLINE NO PRESCRIPTION.
...
Buy Calan no prescription, "Whomever they got as a copy editor at Penguin" should have gone line by line to check the poems, because Breese didn't think she should have had to. She did not look at the original source of the materials. "I made Xerox copies from Not Much Fun," she said. The plaintiff's attorneys read Parker poems from the original sources and then compared them to what Breese used in Complete Poems. This was very tedious as they talked about Emdashes, capitalization, and line breaks, BUY Calan ONLINE NO PRESCRIPTION.
"Line by line? Breese asked, Indianapolis, Indiana, San Francisco, California. "No. I did not do any copyediting in Complete Poems."
After Complete Poems was published in early 1999, Michael Millman sent about five complimentary copies to Breese, with a nice note.
...
BUY Calan ONLINE NO PRESCRIPTION, Breese was never told if the book was a success or not, and sales figures were never shared with her.
...
BUY Fludiazepam ONLINE NO PRESCRIPTION, Midwestern college instructor Colleen "Mikki" Breese came to his attention, as her testimony revealed in Day Three, sometime in 1993, around the time of the centenary of Parker's birth.
...
The timeline of events showed that Millman mailed Breese a copy of "Not Much Fun" when his 2001 deposition was read back to him.
...
Millman's correspondence with Breese was read back to him, which shows he brought up NMF with her. Breese then photocopied the pages of NMF to use for Complete Poems.
...
Breese then sent the manuscript for Complete Poems to Millman, Purchase Fludiazepam online, who ultimately sent it to the production department.
...
Letters from 1995 to 1996 were introduced that show Millman and Breese were working on Complete Poems, and that the NAACP had agreed to a contract to publish it.
...
After watching Breese on the monitor for a few hours now, Buy Fludiazepam from canada, she is beginning to be a more sympathetic character to me. She looks like my grandmother, taking her reading glasses off and then putting them back on. Breese did not think she was doing anything wrong when she photocopied Parker stories and poems over the years of teaching, BUY Fludiazepam ONLINE NO PRESCRIPTION. She just wanted Parker books to use in her classroom, and, lo and behold, Fludiazepam 500mg, an editor at Penguin said she could have her wish. It must have been exciting for her, a part-time instructor at a small college in Ohio, to be getting faxes and packages sent to her from a prestigious New York City publishing house to the English department offices of her college.
...
Breese said that when Penguin flew her to New York to give her deposition, the company put her up at the Soho Grand Hotel. BUY Fludiazepam ONLINE NO PRESCRIPTION, So Penguin spent more on her hotel bill than they did on Breese's fee to edit their book. At one point on the tape, when she said she was no longer at Toledo University, Detroit, Michigan, San Jose, California, Breese said she didn't have an office any more. She looked pretty sad to say it, as if she missed university life.
When the DVD fired up again, Breese said that while using photocopied material, Where can i order Fludiazepam without prescription, it was always a problem to get clear copies, there was an "interest in clarity" to consider. Rather than use second or third generation copies, she wanted to use a clean book: NMF. Breese did not do what Silverstein did, go to microfilm to locate Parker's poems and verses, comprar en línea Fludiazepam, comprar Fludiazepam baratos, she said, because copies from microfilm "are muddy or have spots" and that "none of them are really good.
...
Breese was not asked and did not say that she actually owned any Parker books to make her photocopies from.
Next came the line of questions I was waiting to hear, about when she learned she might be in hot water for editing Complete Poems. She said she did not learn that Silverstein had sent a demand letter claiming copyright infringement to Penguin. BUY Fludiazepam ONLINE NO PRESCRIPTION, Breese said she became aware of the sticky issue much later. "My knowledge begins in May 2001," she said firmly. Her claim was that during the months Silverstein was asking Penguin for documents, Penguin did not contact her about it. However, in the responses to Silverstein that were sent from Penguin before the lawsuit began, Breese was mentioned, as if she had a hand in helping Penguin explain herself.
The trial is also showing what a neophyte to publishing that Breese was. How Penguin could use someone of this caliber to edit one of its most important authors is almost unfathomable, BUY Fludiazepam ONLINE NO PRESCRIPTION. Breese said she did not know what line editors do. That was explained to her.
...
Breese said Complete Poems started when Millman called her.
...
Rx free Furosemide, We watched the beginning of a video deposition taken in December 2001 from Colleen "Mikki" Breese, a former instructor at the University of Toledo. Breese
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