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2016-05-14T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Colette Auerswald?

Dr. Colette Auerswald

Associate Professor, Community Health and Human Development

Berkeley

Direct Phone: (415) ***-****       

Email: c***@***.edu

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Berkeley

2736 Bancroft Way

Berkeley, California 94704

United States

Company Description

The Berkeley Historical Society, founded in the summer of 1978 from the ad-hoc Berkeley Centennial Celebration Committee, is a non-profit, all volunteer group dedicated to researching, preserving and sharing Berkeley's history. Through exhibits, lectures, ... more

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Background Information

Employment History

University of California

Assistant Professor of Pediatrics

MCH

Affiliations

Co-Founder
Innovations for Youth

Co-Founder
I4Y

Education

M.D.

MS Assistant Professor of Pediatrics Division of Adolescent Medicine Box 0503

Web References (91 Total References)


In The News | Tri-County Services

www.tricountyservices.org [cached]

All the deaths in this cohort were preventable," said lead author Dr. Colette Auerswald, a pediatrician and adolescent medicine specialist who is an associate professor of public health at UC Berkeley. "Stigma kills."

On any given night, there are an estimated 1,378 homeless young people on the streets of San Francisco. Most of these youth cycle in and out of their homes because of abuse, family problems, or drug use, Auerswald said.
...
One young person died from complications of HIV, a death that was also preventable, Auerswald noted.
Furthermore, the researchers found that injection drug use may be a potential predictor of death for homeless youth. Two-thirds of those who died had injected drugs at some point, as opposed to one-third of survivors.
"It is critical that we have on-demand access to substance abuse treatment for all youth, including minors, in San Francisco, where drugs are a huge problem regardless of homelessness," Auerswald said. "Drugs are a major cause of morbidity and mortality and of the failure of young people to remove themselves from the street."
While the study is relatively small, the findings are in line with other data in Europe and the U.S. that recorded the deaths of young homeless people.
For their research, Auerswald and her team actually went out on the street to talk to the young people, instead of finding them at homeless programs or drop-in centers. Such program-based recruitment produces a biased sample favoring lower-risk youth who access services, she said.


Lead author of the study, Dr ...

www.independent.co.uk [cached]

Lead author of the study, Dr Colette Auerswald, an associate professor of public health at UC Berkeley, attributes the results to the stigma that surrounds homeless youth in the region.

"This population is highly stigmatized. That stigma leads to neglect and, in turn, to increased mortality," Dr Auerswald said.
...
"Being homeless is dangerous for everybody, but the social environment of the street is particularly treacherous for young women," Dr Auerswald said.
...
Dr Auerswald praised the study in a 4 April editorial.
"That study once again blew out of the water the myth that youth either choose to be on the street or are on the street because they are delinquents," she wrote.
...
Homeless youth proved challenging to identify for researchers, particularly black and Latino who, according to Dr Auerswald, put considerable effort in concealing the fact that they are without homes.


All the deaths in this cohort ...

news.berkeley.edu [cached]

All the deaths in this cohort were preventable," said the study's main author, Colette Auerswald, a pediatrician and adolescent medicine specialist who is an associate professor of public health at UC Berkeley. "Stigma kills."

The study will appear online April 14 in the open-access journal PeerJ. Auerswald, co-founder of Innovations for Youth (I4Y), the UC Berkeley School of Public Health's center for adolescent population health, co-authored the study with Jessica Lin of UC Berkeley's School of Public Health and Andrea Parriott of UCSF's Phillip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies.
...
The most recent HUD-mandated point-in-time count in San Francisco, mandated by the Department of Housing and Urban Development, led to an estimate that 1,378 homeless young people are on the streets of San Francisco on any given night, though most of them cycle in and out of their homes because of abuse, family problems or drug use, Auerswald said. In an editorial she wrote last week for the journal JAMA Pediatrics, she praised a new study that reinforced the fact that homeless youth are not homeless by choice.
"That study once again blew out of the water the myth that youth either choose to be on the street or are on the street because they are delinquents," she said.
...
The data on transitional age youth (TAY), mandated by the Department of Housing and Urban Development, is almost certainly an undercount, according to Auerswald.
During that six-year period, 11 died - eight men and three women, or 5 percent of the study group - 10.6 times higher than expected for a similar group matched for age, race and gender. Six of the deaths took place outside California.
Three of the deaths were suicides, one was a homicide and the others were related to drug or alcohol use, either from an accidental overdose or disease linked to substance abuse or sexual behavior. One youth died from complications from HIV, a death that was also preventable, Auerswald said.
Auerswald acknowledged that the study was relatively small, but its findings are in line with other data in Europe and the U.S. that reported deaths of youths as subsets of studies of the general homeless population. A recent census-based study of life expectancies in Canada found that a 25-year-old male living in shelters, rooming houses or hotels had a 32 percent chance of surviving to the age of 75, as compared to 51 percent of housed males from the lowest-fifth income bracket.
"This is the first North American study of mortality, and the only one I know of globally, focused solely on a street-based cohort of youth," Auerswald said.
The study was unique in that Auerswald and her colleagues actually went out on the street to survey homeless youth, instead of seeking them out at programs or drop-in centers for homeless youth. Such program-based recruitment produces a biased sample favoring lower-risk youth who access services, she said. Homeless youth are challenging and expensive to count, in part, because some youth of color - African Americans, Hispanics and Latinos in particular - do all they can to conceal the fact that they are homeless. Homeless white youth in San Francisco - who comprised half the study subjects - are more likely to openly sit on sidewalks or engage in activities such as panhandling that readily identify them as homeless.
Funded by the California Homeless Youth Project through a grant from the California Wellness Foundation, Auerswald and Lin developed and implemented We Count, California!, a statewide technical assistance program to increase capacity for conducting more inclusive counts of homeless youth.
...
"It is critical that we have on-demand access to substance abuse treatment for all youth, including minors, in San Francisco, where drugs are a huge problem regardless of homelessness," Auerswald said.


All the deaths in this cohort ...

www.eurekalert.org [cached]

All the deaths in this cohort were preventable," said the study's main author, Colette Auerswald, a pediatrician and adolescent medicine specialist who is an associate professor of public health at UC Berkeley. "Stigma kills."

The study will appear online April 14 in the open-access journal PeerJ. Auerswald, co-founder of I4Y, the UC Berkeley School of Public Health's center for adolescent population health, co-authored the study with Jessica Lin of UC Berkeley's School of Public Health and Andrea Parriott of UCSF's Phillip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies.
...
The most recent HUD-mandated point-in-time count in San Francisco, mandated by the Department of Housing and Urban Development, led to an estimate that 1,378 homeless young people are on the streets of San Francisco on any given night, though most of them cycle in and out of their homes because of abuse, family problems or drug use, Auerswald said. In an editorial she wrote last week for the journal JAMA Pediatrics, she praised a new study that reinforced the fact that homeless youth are not homeless by choice.
"That study once again blew out of the water the myth that youth either choose to be on the street or are on the street because they are delinquents," she said.
...
One youth died from complications from HIV, a death that was also preventable, Auerswald said.
Auerswald acknowledged that the study was relatively small, but its findings are in line with other data in Europe and the U.S. that reported deaths of youths as subsets of studies of the general homeless population. A recent census-based study of life expectancies in Canada found that a 25-year-old male living in shelters, rooming houses or hotels had a 32 percent chance of surviving to the age of 75, as compared to 51 percent of housed males from the lowest-fifth income bracket.
"This is the first North American study of mortality, and the only one I know of globally, focused solely on a street-based cohort of youth," Auerswald said.
The study was unique in that Auerswald and her colleagues actually went out on the street to survey homeless youth, instead of seeking them out at programs or drop-in centers for homeless youth. Such program-based recruitment produces a biased sample favoring lower-risk youth who access services, she said. Homeless youth are challenging and expensive to count, in part, because some youth of color - African Americans, Hispanics and Latinos in particular - do all they can to conceal the fact that they are homeless. Homeless white youth in San Francisco - who comprised half the study subjects - are more likely to openly sit on sidewalks or engage in activities such as panhandling that readily identify them as homeless.
Funded by the California Homeless Youth Project through a grant from the California Wellness Foundation, Auerswald and Lin developed and implemented We Count, California!, a statewide technical assistance program to increase capacity for conducting more inclusive counts of homeless youth.
...
"It is critical that we have on-demand access to substance abuse treatment for all youth, including minors, in San Francisco, where drugs are a huge problem regardless of homelessness," Auerswald said.


Presented by: Colette ...

www.calyouth.org [cached]

Presented by: Colette Auerswald of UC Berkeley

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