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This profile was last updated on 6/17/2017 and contains contributions from the  Zoominfo Community.

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Wrong Christopher Gardner?

Christopher D. Gardner

Assistant Professor of Medicine

Stanford University

HQ Phone:  (650) 723-2300

Direct Phone: (650) ***-****direct phone

Email: g***@***.edu

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Stanford University

857 Serra Street, Suite 210

Stanford, California,94305

United States

Company Description

Stanford University, located between San Francisco and San Jose in the heart of California's Silicon Valley, is one of the world's leading teaching and research universities. Since its opening in 1891, Stanford has been dedicated to finding solutions to big ch...more

Web References(151 Total References)


Scientific and Technical Advisory Council - Menus of Change - The Culinary Institute of America

www.menusofchange.org [cached]

Christopher Gardner, PhD
Professor of Medicine at Stanford University, Director of the Nutrition Studies Group and the Postdoctoral Research Fellow Training Program at Stanford Prevention Research Center (Palo Alto, CA)


About us : Beautifull.com | Beautifull

beautifull.com [cached]

Dr. Christopher Gardner
Christopher D. Gardner, PhD, is Director of Nutrition Studies at the Stanford Prevention Research Center and an Associate Professor of Medicine at Stanford University. He received his PhD in Nutritional Sciences in 1993 from the University of California, Berkeley. His postgraduate training included a postdoctoral fellowship in cardiovascular disease epidemiology at Stanford. Dr. Gardner is actively involved in research and teaching. His research focus is on dietary intervention trials designed to test the effects of food components or food patterns on chronic disease risk factors, including body weight, blood lipids, and inflammatory markers. He has published extensively in peer-reviewed journals, including a recent publication in JAMA of a study contrasting the weight loss effects of four diets ranging from very low to very high carbohydrate among more than 300 women who were assigned to the diets for one year. Dr. Christopher Gardner


Christopher Gardner - Menus of Change - The Culinary Institute of America

www.menusofchange.org [cached]

Christopher Gardner, PhD
Christopher Gardner Christopher Gardner, PhD, is a professor of medicine at Stanford University, the director of Stanford Prevention Research Center's (SPRC) Nutrition Studies Group, and the director of the SPRC postdoctoral research fellow training program. His primary research focus for the past decade has been randomized, controlled nutrition intervention trials (soy, garlic, antioxidants, ginkgo, omega-3 fats, vegetarian diets, weight loss diets), testing the effects of these on chronic disease risk factors that have included blood cholesterol, weight, and inflammatory markers.


Probiotic Supplement and Microbiome, Immune System and Metabolic Syndrome

www.joinclinicaltrials.com [cached]

Verified June 2017 by Christopher Gardner, Stanford University
Sponsor: Stanford University Collaborator: The Clorox Company Information provided by (Responsible Party): Christopher Gardner, Stanford University ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: Further study details as provided by Christopher Gardner, Stanford University: Christopher D Gardner, PhD Principal Investigator: Stanford University Christopher Gardner, Associate Professor of Medicine, Stanford University ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:


jilleduffy: August 2008

www.jilleduffy.com [cached]

I searched for these lists online recently after attending a talk in San Francisco by Christopher Gardner, a nutritional scientist and associate professor of medicine at Stanford University, who was speaking at a lecture series known as Science Café.
One of the most alarming points Gardner made the night of his talk, which was held back in June in a San Francisco coffee shop in the Mission district, was about why and how researchers choose their research. Researchers need to craft research studies that will get funded. Funding is most likely to go to studies that look at "acute deficiencies diseases," Gardner said, meaning diseases that lend themselves well to being studied in isolation, and studies that look at isolated causes and effects of acute deficiencies diseases. Scientifically speaking, that type of pinpointed research is the most reliable. However, it completely eradicates a holistic approach to health and wellness. Gardner says the NHS is running out of money to give, and the more it runs low on grant money, the less likely it is to fund research that falls outside the "acute deficiency" criterion. From a cultural perspective, Gardner said, we scientists should study eating patterns as a whole, not the effects of one nutrient. The diseases and problems most affecting our generation nutritionally are chronic, like heart diseases and adult onset diabetes, which often are the result of long-term and complex habits, not single factors in isolation as is the case for, say, anemia. "We are not going to find out nutritionally how to prevent chronic disease," Gardner said. Gardner talked about the dirty dozen list only briefly. He also mentioned that organics, as a market, has been doubling each year.


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