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Wrong Christopher Armitage?

Christopher Arden Armitage

Professor of Health Psychology

The University of Manchester

HQ Phone:  +44 161 306 6000

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

The University of Manchester

Oxford Road

Manchester, Manchester,M13 9PT

United Kingdom

Company Description

The University of Manchester has been at the forefront of development studies for over 60 years. The Global Development Institute continues the commitment to addressing global poverty and inequality, by uniting the strengths of the Institute for Development ...more

Background Information

Employment History

Professor

Manchester


Associate Editor

British Psychological Society


Affiliations

Psychology Network

Committe Member


Education

BA


PhD


Web References(27 Total References)


Our Research Team | MISC - Manchester Implementation Science Collaboration

www.mcrimpsci.org [cached]

Chris Armitage
Professor Chris Armitage is a Professor of Health Psychology at the University of Manchester School of Psychological Sciences. His research is about behaviour and behaviour change and he is particularly interested in the role of the volitional help sheet in increasing implementation of intentions into practice. He is extensively published and has held numerous research grants from charities and research councils. He is on the editorial board and is associate editor for a number of psychology journals.


Institute members: A-Z (Institute of Human Development - University of Manchester)

www.human-development.manchester.ac.uk [cached]

Christopher Arden Armitage
Professor of Health Psychology


www.bbmh.manchester.ac.uk

Chris Armitage
Professor of Health Psychology chris.armitage@manchester.ac.uk


www.micra.manchester.ac.uk

Prof. Chris Armitage, School of Psychological Science, The University of Manchester


Cutting smoking: not so plain and simple? | ClinPsy Repository

www.ronjtaylor.co.uk [cached]

We spoke to Chris Armitage, Professor of Health Psychology at the University of Manchester and a member of the British Psychological Society Behaviour Change Advisory Group.
He said the change in packaging was unlikely to result in current smokers changing their behaviour, but could dissuade young people from taking up smoking. He said: 'Moodie et al. (2013) showed that regular smokers were less inclined to quit smoking in response to packaging in 2011 (after graphic images were introduced on packaging), compared to 2008 (before graphic images were introduced on packaging), so plain packaging is unlikely to make much difference to current smokers.' Regarding young smokers, Professor Armitage said that before advertising bans on smoking, research tended to show that awareness of advertising and motivation to smoke were linked and therefore any reduced exposure to advertising is likely to reduce the chance of smoking uptake. He added: 'One concern for the future is whether e-cigarette advertising and/or e-cigarette uptake ultimately turns out to be a precursor to future cigarette smoking. 'Although nicotine consumption per se does not appear to be related to increased risk of cancer, there is some evidence that nicotine disrupts brain reward mechanisms that could increase susceptibility to other drugs (e.g. Kenny & Markou, 2006; Yurasek et al., 2013).' When asked whether standardized packaging should be a priority for the Government in its attempts to stop people from smoking, Professor Armitage told The Psychologist: 'There is a large body of evidence, stretching back quite a few years (e.g. Peterson et al., 1992) suggesting that increased taxation will reduce both uptake and consumption of cigarettes.


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