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Wrong Christina Rainville?

Christina Rainville

State's Attorney

Bennington County Sheriff's Department

HQ Phone:  (802) 442-4900

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Bennington County Sheriff's Department

P.O. Box 4207

Bennington, Vermont,05201

United States

Company Description

Founded in 1781 The Bennington County Sheriff's Department - Serving Bennington County Vermont ...more

Background Information

Employment History

Trial Attorney

Securities and Exchange Commission


Web References(200 Total References)


SOL Reform | Very good start in VT!

sol-reform.com [cached]

The Vermont Legislature agreed Tuesday to extend the statute of limitations on crimes committed against children after a local prosecutor, Bennington County Chief Deputy State's Attorney Christina Rainville, sought changes following the Sandusky's trial.
Rainville told The Banner that the Sandusky case was a "watershed moment" for her and led her to seek a change in state law. She approached Bennington County Democratic Sen. If Sandusky's abuses - alleged to have taken place between 1994 and 2009 - had happened in Vermont, Rainville noted that only six of the eight victims in that case would not have been able to bring charges because of the time limitations.


Spotlight Archives - The Vermont Children's Alliance

www.vtchildrensalliance.org [cached]

MDT member Christina Rainville
Christina Rainville, the Chief Deputy State's Attorney for Bennington County and BCCAC MDT member, approached Senator Dick Sears seeking changes in the law after the much-publicized trial and conviction of former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky last year. But the main force behind the new statute of limitations was Rainville. "We sign this bill for all of Vermont's kids and all the people who are working so hard in the field to keep them safe," Shumlin said, before signing the bill and handing the pen to Rainville. L to R - Christina Rainville (Deputy State's Attorney); Senator Dick Sears; Governor Peter Shumlin (seated); Representative Mary Morrissey; Erica Marthage (State's Attorney); Representative Ann Mook; Linda Campbell (Executive Director PAVE); Jill Maynard (Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner); Tammy Loveland (State's Attorney Victim Advocate)


Program Staff Information

www.heal-online.org [cached]

Bennington County State's Attorney Christina Rainville said the state had dismissed the charge because her office's investigators believed that while the student was credible, the incident did not constitute a criminal act.
The lewd and lascivious conduct charge involved a different student who was 12 when she spoke to police. Bennington County State's Attorney Christina Rainville said the state had dismissed the charge because her office's investigators believed that while the student was credible, the incident did not constitute a criminal act. The lewd and lascivious conduct charge involved a different student who was 12 when she spoke to police.


January 2014 - week 4 - Recent News | NAASCA.org - National Association of Adult Survivors of Child Abuse

www.naasca.org [cached]

Christina was 12 years old when she first approached a homeless youth drop-in center.
She reported that her mentally ill mother's boyfriend was physically abusive to her entire family. The counseling center contacted child welfare, and Christina and all of her siblings were placed in different homes. Feeling unsafe, Christina eventually returned to her mother, where an adult couple recruited the teen into prostitution for two years. Keisha, Evelyn, Christina and so many others like them deserve the same chance to live well after surviving the trauma of being trafficked. Bennington County State's Attorney Christina Rainville used a recent Bennington massage parlor investigation as an example of how current laws stymied her office's attempt to halt what appeared to be a trafficking operation, she said. Rainville described her office's fruitless 2013 human trafficking investigation into two massage parlors. Rainville's office got a call from the FBI that they were investigating spas in Bennington in connection with prostitution in New York City. Her office secured warrants and raided the Green Spa and Cozy Spa, but the Korean women they found denied being prostitutes and had proper living quarters, food and passports. Investigators found no records, client lists or cash, or other evidence of human trafficking. They're incredibly sophisticated, the people running these spas in Vermont, Rainville said. Owners told police they only give hand jobs and in Vermont that's legal, Rainville said. I went and looked at the statute and I was shocked to see that in fact our definition of prostitution did not cover this so we couldn't charge them, she said. Meanwhile it is a risk to allow the spas to continue operating, Rainville said, because they could be trafficking the women who work there. And people in Bennington don't like them, she said. She said there are about 13 or 14 such spas that offer happy endings in Vermont, especially on the New York border because that state broadened its definition of prostitution. Right now, it's inadvertently legal and I think that the committee probably should make it illegal, she said.


www.timesargus.com

In a motion filed this week, Christina Rainville, chief deputy state's attorney in Bennington County, asked the state's top court for reconsideration in two recent Bennington criminal cases.
Rainville said in the motion that one issue at stake was whether the Department of Mental Health should have sole authority to request an extension of treatment beyond 90 days. "The description provided by (Morris) demonstrates how countless defendants are being denied services and hospitalization solely based on their diagnosis of disability," Rainville said, "such that defendants with Huntington's disease, autism, PTSD and dementia are routinely being denied care and sent to prison when they re-offend, when they … should be in a hospital." Rainville declined to comment on the brief Wednesday because it's an open case. Rainville said this could not have been the intent of the Legislature, because if only that department has standing, there could be no hearing as no one would be allowed to offer another view. The brief points to a cycle that prosecutors say is not uncommon: A person with mental problems commits a crime and is arrested and found incompetent. A 90-day order is issued, but then the person is released by the Department of Mental Health, whether the prosecutor agrees or not, and the person then commits another crime. "As a result, public safety is put at risk and many defendants who should receive services in a hospital are instead released with no services and no supervision - only to be housed in jail, again and again, when they repeatedly commit crimes and start the process over," Rainville said.


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