Share This Profile
Share this profile on Facebook.
Link to this profile on LinkedIn.
Tweet this profile on Twitter.
Email a link to this profile.
See other services through which you can share this profile.
This profile was last updated on 5/4/13  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Christin Lee Munsch

Wrong Christin Lee Munsch?

Researcher and Sociologist

Phone: (800) ***-****  HQ Phone
Local Address: Ithaca, New York, United States
Cornell University
Cornell School of Hotel Administration 489
Statler Hall Ithaca, New York 14853
United States

Company Description: Founded in 1865, Cornell is the federal land-grant institution of New York State, a private endowed university, a member of the Ivy League, and a partner of the...   more
Background

Employment History

Board Memberships and Affiliations

  • Postdoctoral Research Fellow
    Stanford University
  • Postdoctoral Research Fellow
    Kjerstin Gruys
  • Postdoctoral Research Fellow
    Stanford's Michelle R. Clayman Institute for Gender Research
25 Total References
Web References
Wives who earn more money than ...
thehomeeconomist.com, 22 Oct 2012 [cached]
Wives who earn more money than their husbands are most likely to be victims of infidelity, if you believe study results from Cornell University researcher and sociologist Christin Munsch. She says that men who are completely economically dependent on their wives are five times more likely to cheat on them. Munich examined national data and determined that young married men who earned 40 percent or less of their household's income most often reported having an additional sex partner or having sex with a stranger. She blames the phenomenon on our society targeting men as the breadwinners.
"It's threatening when they're not," says Munsch.
Marriage | Dr. Walt's Health Blog
www.drwalt.com, 1 Feb 2013 [cached]
Study author Christin Munsch said, "... for men, the less money you make relative to your spouse, the more likely you are to engage in infidelity."
Munsch, a graduate student at Cornell University, said she came up with the idea of studying the effects of income on infidelity after hearing from a friend who has cheated on his partner. He told Munsch that "she made all the money, she had all the friends, and he'd moved up there to be with her. He felt completely powerless."
While there's been previous research into infidelity, it didn't look into differences in income among couples, Munsch said.
So she examined the results of a national survey that tracked 9,000 people beginning in 1997 when they were children. She focused on the results of the survey from 2001-2007, when the participants were between 17 and 27 years old.
The findings were released at the American Sociological Association annual meeting in Atlanta.
Two lifestyle factors, higher education and regular religious observance, seem to help keep infidelity at bay for both men and women, the study found.
But factors having to do with money - such as the man making more or less than his wife or female partner - did increase the risk of infidelity, Munsch said.
If you're a woman and "you make more money than your partner, your partner isn't 100 percent likely to cheat," she stressed. Still, money appeared to be a significant factor.
Men who make less than their wives may lean toward infidelity because they feel a "gender identity threat," Munsch speculated.
Christin Munsch, a ...
www.pasadenalawoffice.com, 14 Sept 2012 [cached]
Christin Munsch, a postdoctoral research fellow at Stanford's Michelle R. Clayman Institute for Gender Research, reports that men who are economically dependent upon their wives are more likely to cheat. He hypothesizes that they feel that their masculinity is being threatened because they are no longer able to fulfill the traditional breadwinner role.
Infidelity Rises When She Makes More Than He Does | Speed Dating NYC| Speed Dating Long Island| Long Island Singles| Singles New York
www.weekenddating.com, 29 May 2012 [cached]
"With women, they were less likely to engage in infidelity the less money they make relative to their husband," said study author Christin Munsch. "But for men, the less money you make relative to your spouse, the more likely you are to engage in infidelity."
Munsch, a graduate student at Cornell University, said she came up with the idea of studying the effects of income on infidelity after hearing from a friend who has cheated on his partner. He told Munsch that "she made all the money, she had all the friends, and he'd moved up there to be with her. He felt completely powerless."
While there's been previous research into infidelity, it didn't look into differences in income among couples, Munsch said.
So she examined the results of a national survey that tracked 9,000 people beginning in 1997 when they were children. She focused on the results of the survey from 2001-2007, when the participants were between 17 and 27 years old.
The findings are scheduled to be released Monday at the American Sociological Association annual meeting in Atlanta.
Munsch found that almost 7 percent of the men reported having sex outside their relationships between 2002 and 2007, while about 3 percent of women did. Black and Hispanic men were more likely than white men to have fooled around.
Two lifestyle factors, higher education and regular religious observance, seem to help keep infidelity at bay for both men and women, the study found.
But factors having to do with money - such as the man making more or less than his wife or female partner - did increase the risk of infidelity, Munsch said. But she cautioned that "we're talking about very small numbers."
If you're a woman and "you make more money than your partner, your partner isn't 100 percent likely to cheat," she stressed.
Still, money appeared to be a significant factor.
Men who make less than their wives may lean toward infidelity because they feel a "gender identity threat," Munsch speculated.
"The range of acceptable behaviors for men is a lot narrower" when it comes to dynamics in a relationship, such as those involving finances, she said.
...
"If you work long hours and have more disposable income, it's easier to hide infidelity," Munsch reasoned. For example, unusual expenses charged to credit cards might go unnoticed. Also, she said, people who make more money may also travel frequently and meet lots of people of the opposite sex.
"With women, they were less likely ...
lakewoodregional.staywellsolutionsonline.com, 16 Aug 2010 [cached]
"With women, they were less likely to engage in infidelity the less money they make relative to their husband," said study author Christin Munsch. "But for men, the less money you make relative to your spouse, the more likely you are to engage in infidelity."
Munsch, a graduate student at Cornell University, said she came up with the idea of studying the effects of income on infidelity after hearing from a friend who has cheated on his partner. He told Munsch that "she made all the money, she had all the friends, and he'd moved up there to be with her. He felt completely powerless."
While there's been previous research into infidelity, it didn't look into differences in income among couples, Munsch said.
So she examined the results of a national survey that tracked 9,000 people beginning in 1997 when they were children. She focused on the results of the survey from 2001-2007, when the participants were between 17 and 27 years old.
The findings are scheduled to be released Monday at the American Sociological Association annual meeting in Atlanta.
Munsch found that almost 7 percent of the men reported having sex outside their relationships between 2002 and 2007, while about 3 percent of women did. Black and Hispanic men were more likely than white men to have fooled around.
Two lifestyle factors, higher education and regular religious observance, seem to help keep infidelity at bay for both men and women, the study found.
But factors having to do with money -- such as the man making more or less than his wife or female partner -- did increase the risk of infidelity, Munsch said. But she cautioned that "we're talking about very small numbers."
If you're a woman and "you make more money than your partner, your partner isn't 100 percent likely to cheat," she stressed.
Still, money appeared to be a significant factor.
Men who make less than their wives may lean toward infidelity because they feel a "gender identity threat," Munsch speculated.
"The range of acceptable behaviors for men is a lot narrower" when it comes to dynamics in a relationship, such as those involving finances, she said.
...
"If you work long hours and have more disposable income, it's easier to hide infidelity," Munsch reasoned. For example, unusual expenses charged to credit cards might go unnoticed. Also, she said, people who make more money may also travel frequently and meet lots of people of the opposite sex.
...
SOURCES: Christin Munsch, graduate student, Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y.; Helen Fisher, Ph.D., research professor, department of anthropology, Rutgers University, New York City; Aug. 16, 2010, presentation, American Sociological Association, annual meeting, Atlanta
Other People with the name "Munsch":
Other ZoomInfo Searches
Accelerate your business with the industry's most comprehensive profiles on business people and companies.
Find business contacts by city, industry and title. Our B2B directory has just-verified and in-depth profiles, plus the market's top tools for searching, targeting and tracking.
Atlanta | Boston | Chicago | Houston | Los Angeles | New York
Browse ZoomInfo's business people directory. Our professional profiles include verified contact information, biography, work history, affiliations and more.
Browse ZoomInfo's company directory. Our company profiles include corporate background information, detailed descriptions, and links to comprehensive employee profiles with verified contact information.
zirhbt201304