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2015-09-21T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Christin Munsch?

Dr. Christin Munsch L.

Assistant Professor of Sociology

Furman University

HQ Phone: (864) 294-2000

Email: m***@***.edu

Furman University

3300 Poinsett Hwy.

Greenville, South Carolina 29613

United States

Company Description

Furman's NCAA Division I athletics program is composed of 17 intercollegiate sports (nine for women, eight for men) and includes approximately 310 student-athletes, representing approximately 12 percent of the university student body. Furman competes in t... more

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Background Information

Employment History

President
Sociologists for Women in Society

Assistant Professor of Sociology
University of Connecticut

Editor
American Sociological Association

Editor
CFDynamics

Affiliations

Member
The Clayman Institute for Gender Research

Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Stanford University

Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Kjerstin Gruys

Web References (172 Total References)


Study author Christin ...

www.Wellergize.ca [cached]

Study author Christin Munsch, an assistant professor of sociology at Furman University, analyzed the reactions both men and women received when making flexible work requests -- meaning that they either asked to work from home or to work non-traditional hours.

Among those who made flexible work requests, men who asked to work from home two days a week in order to care for a child were significantly advantaged compared to women who made the same request. Munsch, who will present her research at the 109th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association, also found that both men and women who made flexible work requests for childcare related reasons were advantaged compared to those who made the same requests for other reasons.
For her study, Munsch used a sample of 646 people who ranged in age from 18 to 65 and resided in the United States. Participants were shown a transcript and told it was an actual conversation between a human resources representative and an employee. The employee either requested a flexible work arrangement or did not. Among those who requested a flexible work arrangement, the employee either asked to come in early and leave early three days a week, or asked to work from home two days a week. Munsch also varied the gender of the employee and the reason for the request (involving childcare or not). After reading their transcript, participants were asked how likely they would be to grant the request and also to evaluate the employee on several measures, including how likeable, committed, dependable, and dedicated they found him or her.
Among those who read the scenario in which a man requested to work from home for childcare related reasons, 69.7 percent said they would be "likely" or "very likely" to approve the request, compared to 56.7 percent of those who read the scenario in which a woman made the request. Almost a quarter -- 24.3 percent -- found the man to be "extremely likeable," compared to only 3 percent who found the woman to be "extremely likeable. And, only 2.7 percent found the man "not at all" or "not very" committed, yet 15.5 percent found the woman "not at all" or "not very" committed.
"These results demonstrate how cultural notions of parenting influence perceptions of people who request flexible work," Munsch said.
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Regarding the findings on those who made flexible work requests for childcare versus non-childcare related reasons, Munsch said that "both men and women who requested to work from home or to work atypical hours to take care of a child were viewed as more respectable, likable, committed, and worthy of a promotion, and their requests were more supported than those who requested flexible work for reasons unrelated to childcare."
For example, among those who read a scenario in which an employee asked to work from home two days a week for childcare related reasons, 63.5 percent of the respondents said they would be "likely" or "very likely" to grant the request. However, only 40.7 percent of those who read a scenario in which an employee asked to work from home two days a week to reduce his or her commute time and carbon footprint said they would be "likely" or "very likely" to grant the request.
According to Munsch, these findings surprised her. "I was surprised because so much of the research talks about how parents -- and mothers in particular -- are discriminated against compared to their childless counterparts," she said. "When it comes to flexible work, it seems that engaging in childcare is seen as a more legitimate reason than other, non-childcare related reasons, like training for an endurance event or wanting to reduce your carbon footprint."
While feminists and work-family scholars have championed flexible work options as a way to promote gender equality and as a remedy for work-family conflict, Munsch said that her research "shows that we should be hesitant in assuming this is effective."
Still, Munsch does not believe employers should eliminate flexible work arrangements, but rather they should be cognizant of their biases and the ways in which they "differentially assess people who use these policies, so as not to perpetuate inequality."


Combating flexibility bias for women and men in the workplace - Christin L. Munsch - Womanthology

www.womanthology.co.uk [cached]

Combating flexibility bias for women and men in the workplace - Christin L. Munsch, Assistant Professor, Furman University Sociology Faculty

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Christin L. Munsch joined the Furman University sociology faculty in 2013. Her teaching interests include social psychology, gender, sexuality, family, work and research methods. The underlying goal of her research is to demonstrate how social psychological processes reproduce gender stratification and inequality.
Christin L. Munsch
...
Christin L. Munsch
In a recently published study into requests for flexible working arrangements, presented at the 109th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association, Christin found that many arrangements exacerbate discrimination based on parental status and gender. She analysed reactions both women and men received when they made flexible working requests (either asking to work at home or to work non-traditional hours).


Nis Arend - transforming your entrepreneurial vision into reality - Womanthology

www.womanthology.co.uk [cached]

← Combating flexibility bias for women and men in the workplace - Christin L. Munsch, Assistant Professor, Furman University Sociology Faculty


Network Rail Chief Information Officer, Susan Cooklin is exploding the myths around women in IT - Womanthology

www.womanthology.co.uk [cached]

Combating flexibility bias for women and men in the workplace - Christin L. Munsch, Assistant Professor, Furman University Sociology Faculty →


Christin Munsch is running for ...

socwomen.org [cached]

Christin Munsch is running for the position of Career Development Chair. Christin is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Furman University in South Carolina, and will be joining the Department of Sociology at the University of Connecticut in January of 2015. She has been a member of SWS for 10 years (joining in 2004, her first year of graduate school). She has attended a number of winter and summer meetings including the summer meetings in Boston (2008), San Francisco (2009, 2014), Atlanta (2010), Las Vegas (2011), Denver (2012) and New York City (2013); and the winter meetings in Savannah (2009), San Antonio (2011), Santa Ana Pueblo, NM (2013), and Nashville, TN (2014). Christin has had the opportunity to perform a number of services for SWS. She has served on both the Academic Justice Committee and the Membership Committee for the past three years. She is also on the Welcoming Committee. As a member of the welcoming committee, she has hosted in the hospitality room at each of the meetings she has attended over the past three years. Christin is also responsible for organizing the welcoming activities, including "feminist academic bingo," on the opening night of the SWS winter meetings. She has also been a HAND

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Christin has put together three SWS panels in previous years, including one on how to navigate academia and motherhood and one on how to effectively communicate with the press. (She has also put together workshops on communicating science to the press at her home institution and given guest lectures on this topic at other universities.)
? Christin has moved through multiple stages of the career path at multiple types of institutions. She has been a graduate student, a post doc, and an assistant professor and has taught at both research-intensive universities and teaching-intensive colleges.
? Having participated in the "Faculty Success Program," hosted by the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity, she has an awareness of the varying needs and demands over the course of a career (from grad school to retirement plans).
? Christin is committed to increasing the employability of SWS members.
personal passion of Christin's has been to understand how to succeed in the academy and to help other scholars navigate this process.
? Christin has considerable experience writing for more mainstream, non-academic outlets. The CDC produces Hey Jane! (an "advice column" for feminist sociologists) and Christin is excited about writing about - and soliciting others to write about - issues such as grant seeking, job talks, and negotiating service obligations.
Christin is committed to attend the SWS Winter Meeting during her term of service.

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