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Wrong Christin Munsch?

Christin L. Munsch

Assistant Professor of Sociology

University of Connecticut

HQ Phone:  (860) 679-2000

Direct Phone: (860) ***-****direct phone

Email: c***@***.edu

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

University of Connecticut

263 Farmington Avenue

Farmington, Connecticut,06030

United States

Company Description

The University of Connecticut is one of the top 25 public research universities in the nation and is a research leader in the fields of advanced materials, additive manufacturing, biomedical devices, cybersecurity, energy, life sciences, sensors, and nanotechn...more

Background Information

Employment History

Assistant Professor of Sociology

Furman University


Affiliations

Stanford University

Postdoctoral Research Fellow


SWS

Member


Kjerstin Gruys

Postdoctoral Research Fellow


Education

Ph.D.


Web References(98 Total References)


August 2016 « Blue Ribbon Foundation - Men and Male Health Charity

www.blueribbonfoundation.org.uk [cached]

Dr Christin Munsch, Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Connecticut, undertook a nationally representative study of US-based heterosexual couples.
Controlling for other factors which could explain the differences, Dr Munsch found that "in general, as men took on more financial responsibility in their marriages, their psychological well-being and health declined. Conversely, women's mental health improved when they made greater financial contributions relative to their husband, and worsened if they contributed less. Dr Munsch explained these differences as down to opposing cultural expectations for men and women. Overall, men tended to feel a sense of obligation to be breadwinners tied to their understanding of masculinity, and felt this as a source of pressure and worry when trying to maintaining "breadwinner status". Alternatively, "breadwinning women may feel a sense of pride, without worrying what others will say if they can't or don't maintain it" said Dr Munsch. In conclusion, Dr Munsch said that the study findings were an argument for greater equality in breadwinner status: "our study finds that decoupling breadwinning from masculinity has concrete benefits for both men and women".


Couples who earn similar salaries are less likely to cheat: study | DESTINY MAN

www.destinyman.com [cached]

Study author Christin Munsch, an associate professor at the University of Connecticut, argues that the findings suggest that people don't like inequality in relationships, particularly men, if they're not the breadwinners.
"We naturally compare ourselves to our partners. It's what we do and you don't want to feel like you're always coming out on the losing end of the comparison," Munsch was quoted saying in a Business Insider report. For men, especially young men, the dominant definition of masculinity is scripted in terms of sexual virility and conquest particularly with respect to multiple sex partners," says Munsch. "Thus engaging in infidelity may be a way of re-establishing threatened masculinity. Simultaneously, infidelity allows threatened men to distance themselves from, and perhaps punish their higher-earning spouse." Munsch says women who earn more than their spouses are more "acutely aware" that it goes against the societal norm or cultural expectation, and as a result, as previous research has shown, these women often suffer from increased anxiety and insomnia and tend to engage in what sociologists call "deviance neutralisation behaviours".


2014 Media Coverage | American Sociological Association

www.asanet.org [cached]

Study: Flexible Work, Flexible Penalties: The Effect of Gender, Childcare, and Type of Request on the Flexibility Bias - Christin Munsch (Furman University).


Yay or nay? Men,women react differently to sharing economic responsibility - Tune India Radio | Australian Indian Radio | Indian Radio Sydney Australia |Hindi Radio Australia

radiotuneindia.com.au [cached]

The study led by Christin Munsch, Assistant Professor at the University of Connecticut used data on the representative group of married men and women over 15 years and examined the relationship between men's and women's relative income contributions.
Men are expected to be breadwinners, yet providing for one's family with little or no help has negative repercussions," Munsch said. Munsch attributes these psychological well-being differences to cultural expectations for men and women. Men who make a lot more money than their partners may approach breadwinning with a sense of obligation and worry about maintaining breadwinner status. Women, on the other hand, may approach breadwinning as an opportunity or choice. Breadwinning women may feel a sense of pride, without worrying what others will say if they can't or don't maintain it. "Our study finds that decoupling breadwinning from masculinity has concrete benefits for both men and women," Munsch added.


EPM Channel | Marital Infidelity and Data Visualization

www.epmchannel.com [cached]

Here's a graph from a Washington Post article about a study by Christin Munsch of the University of Connecticut, on marital infidelity in 2,800 married heterosexual couples:
Munsch argues a different conclusion from the assertion in The Washington Post. She observes that:


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