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Wrong Christin Munsch?

Christin L. Munsch

Assistant Professor

University of Connecticut

HQ Phone:  (860) 679-2000

Direct Phone: (860) ***-****direct phone

Email: c***@***.edu

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

University of Connecticut

263 Farmington Avenue

Farmington, Connecticut,06030

United States

Company Description

The University of Connecticut is one of the top 25 public research universities in the nation and is a research leader in the fields of advanced materials, additive manufacturing, biomedical devices, cybersecurity, energy, life sciences, sensors, and nanotechn...more

Background Information

Employment History

President

Sociologists


Assistant Professor of Sociology

Furman University


Affiliations

Stanford University

Postdoctoral Research Fellow


SWS

Member


Kjerstin Gruys

Postdoctoral Research Fellow


Education

Ph.D.


Web References(107 Total References)


Study: Men Who Are Financially Supported By Their Wives are More Likely to Cheat

www.youbeauty.com [cached]

"Engaging in infidelity may be a way of reestablishing threatened masculinity," lead study author Christin L. Munsch, assistant professor of sociology at the University of Connecticut, said in a statement.
"Simultaneously, infidelity allows threatened men to distance themselves from, and perhaps punish, their higher earning spouses. In other words, because men have been raking it in since the beginning of time, they instinctively resist giving us even one minute to feel proud about our paycheck, for fear their testicles will shrivel up. (By comparison, wives who are completely financially supported by their husbands are 5% more likely to cheat, the study found.) READ MORE: The Truth About Cheaters: It's Not You, It's Him On the flip side, because breadwinning women know they're challenging the status quo, says Munsch, they end up engaging in what sociologists call "deviance neutralization behaviors" (or as I like to call it, pulling a June Cleaver). For example, a woman making the moolah might minimize her accomplishments or do more housework - a traditionally feminine gender role - because she thinks it'll balance the scales with her man. "This emotional and physical work is designed to decrease interpersonal conflict and shore up their husbands' masculinity," said Munsch.


The more economically dependent people are on their partners, the more likely they are to cheat, especially if they are men | iGroove Radio

www.igrooveradio.com [cached]

The more economically dependent people are on their partners, the more likely they are to cheat, especially if they are men, said Christin Munsch, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Connecticut.
This measure isn't in terms of absolute income, but how much one partner earns relative to the other. "It suggests that we don't like coming up on the losing end of this comparison, and we're going to seek alternative partners," to possibly make up for it, Munsch told Live Science.


EPM Channel | Marital Infidelity and Data Visualization

www.epmchannel.com [cached]

Here's a graph from a Washington Post article about a study by Christin Munsch of the University of Connecticut, on marital infidelity in 2,800 married heterosexual couples:
Munsch argues a different conclusion from the assertion in The Washington Post. She observes that:


August 2016 « Blue Ribbon Foundation - Men and Male Health Charity

www.blueribbonfoundation.org.uk [cached]

Dr Christin Munsch, Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Connecticut, undertook a nationally representative study of US-based heterosexual couples.
Controlling for other factors which could explain the differences, Dr Munsch found that "in general, as men took on more financial responsibility in their marriages, their psychological well-being and health declined. Conversely, women's mental health improved when they made greater financial contributions relative to their husband, and worsened if they contributed less. Dr Munsch explained these differences as down to opposing cultural expectations for men and women. Overall, men tended to feel a sense of obligation to be breadwinners tied to their understanding of masculinity, and felt this as a source of pressure and worry when trying to maintaining "breadwinner status". Alternatively, "breadwinning women may feel a sense of pride, without worrying what others will say if they can't or don't maintain it" said Dr Munsch. In conclusion, Dr Munsch said that the study findings were an argument for greater equality in breadwinner status: "our study finds that decoupling breadwinning from masculinity has concrete benefits for both men and women".


People More Likely to Cheat as They Become More Economically Dependent on Their Spouses | American Sociological Association

www.asanet.org [cached]

"You would think that people would not want to 'bite the hand that feeds them' so to speak, but that is not what my research shows," said study author Christin L. Munsch, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Connecticut.
"Instead, the findings indicate people like feeling relatively equal in their relationships. People don't like to feel dependent on another person." According to Munsch, in an average year, there is about a 5 percent chance that women who are completely economically dependent on their husbands will cheat, whereas there is about a 15 percent chance that men who are entirely economically dependent on their wives will have an affair. Although Munsch found that economic dependency increases the likelihood of engaging in infidelity for both men and women, there appears to be something that makes men who are not primary breadwinners even more prone to cheating compared to women who are not primary breadwinners. "Extramarital sex allows men undergoing a masculinity threat - that is not being primary breadwinners, as is culturally expected - to engage in behavior culturally associated with masculinity," Munsch said. While Munsch found similarities in the way that men and women respond to being economically dependent, she discovered that men and women who are primary breadwinners in their marriages behave very differently. For women, the more they "breadwin" - that is, the larger their percentage of the combined marital income - the less likely they are to cheat. "Women who out earn their husbands challenge the status quo," said Munsch, who noted that women are least likely to engage in infidelity when they make 100 percent of a couples' total income. "Previous research finds that women who are primary breadwinners are acutely aware of the ways in which they deviate from the cultural expectation that equates men with breadwinning. Consequently, previous research finds these women suffer from increased anxiety and insomnia and engage in what sociologists call 'deviance neutralization behaviors.'" For example, she said women who are the primary breadwinners in their marriages often minimize their achievements, defer to their spouses, and increase their housework. "This emotional and physical work is designed to decrease interpersonal conflict and shore up their husbands' masculinity," Munsch said. "These men are aware that their wives are truly dependent and may think that, as a result, their wives will not leave them even if they cheat," Munsch said.


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