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Wrong Christopher Bonar?

Christopher J. Bonar

Chief Veterinarian

Dallas World Aquarium

HQ Phone:  (214) 720-2224

Email: c***@***.com

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Dallas World Aquarium

1801 N Griffin St

Dallas, Texas,75202

United States

Company Description

The Dallas World Aquarium has been involved with in situ and ex situ conservation of the Orinoco crocodile (Crocodylus intermedius) since 1997 when a joint venture was initiated with FUNPZA and the Crocodile Specialist Group of Venezuela. The venture, supporte... more

Find other employees at this company (39)

Background Information

Employment History

Associate Zoo Veterinarian

Cleveland Metroparks Zoo


Director of Animal Health

Dallas Zoo


Zoo Veterinarian

Fort Wayne Zoo


Affiliations

The Angiogenesis Foundation

Board Member


Education

American College of Zoological Medicine


A.B.

Harvard College


B.S.


Web References(48 Total References)


Kirtlandia Society 2007 Meeting Schedule

kirtlandiasociety.org [cached]

Christopher J. Bonar, VMD,
Chief Veterinarian for the Dallas World Aquarium


Kirtlandia Society 2007 Meeting Schedule

www.kirtlandiasociety.org [cached]

Christopher J. Bonar, VMD,
Chief Veterinarian for the Dallas World Aquarium


Best Practices / FUJI Insights & Images

www.insightsandimages.com [cached]

Christopher Bonar
"If you can cut 20 minutes from the process by not having to deal with processing films or retakes. It can make the difference between a successful procedure and an anesthetic death." Christopher Bonar XC-2's short exposure allows Dallas World Aquarium to keep fish out of water for less time. Christopher Bonar's patients can range in weight from a few grams to a few tons. Their behavior is unpredictable, they can't understand medical advice, and they're incapable of describing what's wrong when they're injured or ill. Bonar sees over 350 species of birds, mammals and reptiles in his role as chief veterinarian at the Dallas World Aquarium, and the challenges he faces in diagnosing and treating his patients are dizzying. "These animals are quite valuable, and not just financially," he says. "Many are members of endangered species. There may be very few of them in captivity, or very few of them left alive." Bonar explains that because most animals' injuries or conditions result in nonspecific symptoms, diagnosing them accurately can be extremely difficult. "Any sort of fracture or damage to the appendicular skeleton will manifest itself as an inability to fly or nonspecific lameness," he says. "The fracture may be palpable, but we can't tell distinct details with what we can feel or see. In terms of illness, signs usually include lethargy, depression and inappetence, and since the animals can't tell you the problem, you're often on a hunt for what may be wrong." Thoracic and abdominal radiography have long been used by veterinarians to survey for problems, and about a year ago, the Dallas World Aquarium upgraded its diagnostic x-ray capabilities through the implementation of an XC-2 computed radiography system from Fujifilm Medical Systems USA. "The CR unit gives a very detailed image, which is especially useful for a lot of the smaller animals we have here, birds and reptiles," Bonar says. "We're looking at things anywhere from 2 to 3 cm thick to maybe 10 cm thick, and we get very excellent detail on the bone and soft tissue structures with this equipment. It's proven to be incredibly useful at getting much better images than we got with conventional film radiography." The CR technology is also useful, Bonar says, in getting baseline images of healthy animals for future comparison. "We do a lot more survey radiographs in my field because for a lot of these animals, there isn't a good library of normal radiographs," he says. "I may be x-raying an animal that has rarely, if ever, been handled before by a vet. There's a baseline component to what we do for getting very basic anatomical knowledge." CR offers another critical advantage over analog radiography in the veterinary environment: speed. "CR is much faster, and because it's much faster it's much safer than film for our patients," Bonar says. Because animals cannot be instructed to remain still for the duration of a scan, they often need to be anesthetized even for short x-rays; when imaging marine animals, the imperative for speed is even more critical: "This is a good modality for many kinds of aquatic animals, even fish," Bonar says, "but you have to work really fast. Bonar shares a story of how a rare animal's life was saved, thanks in part to the aquarium's new CR technology. "No one knows how it happened, but we had a giant river otter sustain a very serious injury, a spinal fracture," he says. Giant river otters, which are native to South America, have been listed as an endangered species since 1999; decades of poaching have decimated their population, and it is estimated that fewer than 5,000 live in the wild, and fewer than 60 in captivity. Using the Fujifilm CR equipment, Bonar was able to identify the otter's injury in a timely manner and treat it rapidly and specifically. "The films are quite dramatic, and the animal made a remarkable recovery," he says. "It's a success story in many ways."


clevelandaquarium.ning.com

Christopher J. Bonar, V.M.D. - President
Chris Bonar began his career as a volunteer at the Pittsburgh Zoo's aquarium in 1982. Later, he studied biology at Harvard University, and while at Harvard, he assisted with field research with Black Rhinos in Kenya and the biomechanics of air breathing in lungfish. He received his VMD from the University of Pennsylvania, School of Veterinary Medicine, in 1991. His post-doctoral internship was in Wildlife Medicine at the Wildlife Center of Virginia. Dr. Bonar is first author on eight peer-reviewed publications and co-author in 12 others, and author or co-author of an equal number of abstracts in scientific literature. In 2009, he became a board-certified Diplomate of the American College of Zoological Medicine. He has served as Zoo Veterinarian for the Fort Wayne Zoo from 1992 to 1994, and as Associate Zoo Veterinarian for the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo from 1994 to 2010. In early 2010 Dr. Bonar left Cleveland to assume his new role as Chief Veterinarian for the Dallas World Aquarium. In 1994 he helped found the Angiogenesis Foundation, serving on its Board of Directors since its inception and presently serving as Chairman of the Board. He is co-founder and President of Cleveland Aquarium, Inc., a non-profit corporation dedicated to building a new public aquarium in Cleveland.


Great Lakes & Seaway Shipping News Archive 2010

www.boatnerd.com [cached]

However, Dr. Chris Bonar, chief veterinarian for the Dallas World Aquarium in Texas, warned that aquariums aren't the kind of attractions that turn cities around on their own.
Bonar, a veterinarian for Cleveland Metroparks Zoo until earlier this year, has worked for 10 years to bring an aquarium to Cleveland. He is president of a nonprofit group raising money and is not connected with Marinescape's plans. "The whole concept has to be part of a mixed-use development. It's not just about a building with fish in it," he said, noting that people visit zoos and aquariums as a form of "social engagement."


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