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This profile was last updated on 7/15/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Dr. Chi-Ming Hai

Wrong Dr. Chi-Ming Hai?
Phone: (401) ***-****  HQ Phone
Email: c***@***.edu
Brown University
45 Prospect Street Box 1876
Providence, Rhode Island 02912
United States

Company Description: At Brown, the ACRIN Biostatistics and Data Management Center provides leadership and sup-port in the design, implementation, and analysis of network studies that...   more
Background

Education

  • Ph.D.
6 Total References
Web References
Chronic Diseases
www.keepitsacred.org, 31 May 2012 [cached]
These findings suggest that e-cigarettes, the battery-powered devices that deliver nicotine in steam without the carcinogenic agents of tobacco smoke, may not significantly reduce smokers' risk for heart disease, said Chi-Ming Hai, Ph.D., of Brown University.
...
Dr. Hai's research on human and rat vascular smooth muscle cells provides evidence of a link between nicotine and atherosclerosis.
In Dr. Hai's experiments, nicotine appeared to drive the formation of a kind of cellular drill called podosome rosettes, which are members of the invadosome family, consisting of invadopodia, podosomes and podosome rosettes. These specialized cell surface assemblies degrade and penetrate the tissue during cell invasion. Invasion of vascular smooth muscle cells from the middle layer of the arterial wall (media) to the inner layer of the arterial wall (intima) contributes substantially to plaque formation in atherosclerosis.
Dr. Hai subjected rat and primary human vascular smooth muscle cells to prolonged (six hours) nicotine treatment, enabling the cells to form podosome rosettes in response to Protein Kinase C (PKC) activation, which controls protein phosphorylation in signal transduction cascades.
...
According to Dr. Hai, a potential clinical implication of these findings is that replacing cigarette smoking by nicotine administration may not bring much benefit to lowering the risk of developing atherosclerosis. Still, Dr. Hai said that he believes that understanding the synergistic mechanisms between nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and PKC in vascular smooth muscle invasion may lead to new therapeutics for minimizing the damaging effects of nicotine on the vascular system.
...
Chi-Ming Hai, Ph.D. Brown University
These findings suggest that e-cigarettes, ...
www.eurekalert.org, 15 Dec 2013 [cached]
These findings suggest that e-cigarettes, the battery-powered devices that deliver nicotine in steam without the carcinogenic agents of tobacco smoke, may not significantly reduce smokers' risk for heart disease, said Chi-Ming Hai, Ph.D., of Brown University.
E-cigarettes have put nicotine back in the news and into the hands of a growing number of U.S. smokers who now "vape," that is, inhale a steam of nicotine, polyethylene glucose (PEG) and flavoring generated by cigarette-shaped vaporizers.
Alhough e-cigarettes are being promoted as "safe" nicotine delivery systems, the safety of nicotine has been disputed, partly because the mechanism by which it acts on the circulatory system has not been well understood.
Dr. Hai's research on human and rat vascular smooth muscle cells provides evidence of a link between nicotine and atherosclerosis.
In Dr. Hai's experiments, nicotine appeared to drive the formation of a kind of cellular drill called podosome rosettes, which are members of the invadosome family, consisting of invadopodia, podosomes and podosome rosettes. These specialized cell surface assemblies degrade and penetrate the tissue during cell invasion. Invasion of vascular smooth muscle cells from the middle layer of the arterial wall (media) to the inner layer of the arterial wall (intima) contributes substantially to plaque formation in atherosclerosis.
Dr. Hai subjected rat and primary human vascular smooth muscle cells to prolonged (six hours) nicotine treatment, enabling the cells to form podosome rosettes in response to Protein Kinase C (PKC) activation, which controls protein phosphorylation in signal transduction cascades.
...
According to Dr. Hai, a potential clinical implication of these findings is that replacing cigarette smoking by nicotine administration may not bring much benefit to lowering the risk of developing atherosclerosis. Still, Dr. Hai said that he believes that understanding the synergistic mechanisms between nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and PKC in vascular smooth muscle invasion may lead to new therapeutics for minimizing the damaging effects of nicotine on the vascular system.
...
Chi-Ming Hai, Ph.D. Brown University
"The finding that nicotine is as ...
www.andhranews.net, 24 Feb 2012 [cached]
"The finding that nicotine is as effective as cigarette smoke in enhancing cellular structural changes, and breakdown of scaffold proteins by vascular smooth muscle cells, suggests that replacing cigarette smoking by nicotine treatment may have limited beneficial effects on atherosclerosis," noted lead researcher Chi-Ming Hai, professor of medical science in the department of molecular pharmacology, physiology, and biotechnology at Brown University.
The lead researcher Chi-Ming ...
www.doctortipster.com [cached]
The lead researcher Chi-Ming Hai, professor of medical science in the Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biotechnology at Brown University, notes that those who want to quit smoking using nicotine replacement therapy may need to reconsider their treatment option.
Chi-Ming Hai, professor of ...
www.browndailyherald.com, 14 Feb 2013 [cached]
Chi-Ming Hai, professor of medical science and one of the professors who has yet to make the switch, said he continues to teach his physiology course on MyCourses because of the site's simpler management system and specialized features that he said facilitate better teaching.
"I was able to receive one-on-one instruction from the staff of MyCourses' (Information Technology Group) whenever I encountered problems," Hai said, adding that he does not believe the support structure for Canvas is as helpful as MyCourses' support services.
"Personally I think that Brown should present the option of choosing one system or the other to the professors," he said.
But administrators said the Canvas information technology group is working to strengthen its troubleshooting methods to aid faculty members with the system."We are constantly working with the vendor to address concerns as they may arise," Bergerson said, adding that she has received positive feedback on Canvas.
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