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Wrong Charles Kartman?

Charles Kartman

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State

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

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Web References(197 Total References)


Charles Kartman Biographic sketch

www.icasinc.org [cached]

Charles Kartman
Charles Kartman was confirmed for the position of Special Envoy for the Korean Peace Talks, with a personal rank of ambassador, on July 27, 1998. His most recent assignment was as Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for East Asian and Pacific Affairs from June 1996. Ambassador Kartman had previously served as Deputy Chief of Mission at the U. S. Embassy in Seoul, Director for Korean Affairs at the Department of State in Washington and as Political Counselor in Seoul. Ambassador Kartman is recognized particularly for his expertise on Northeast Asia, having also served in Japan from 1977 to 1982, as a political officer in the embassy and, lastly, as Consul General in Sapporo. He also served twice in the office of Japanese Affairs at the Department of State, most recently as Deputy Director from 1985 to 1987. Ambassador Kartman has also served in the Department as the senior policy analyst for Asia in the Bureau of Politico-Military Affairs, during which time his attention was largely focused on China and Taiwan; on loan to the Congress as a legislative assistant, working closely with the East Asia Subcommittee of the House Foreign Affairs Committee; and as a special assistant to the Under Secretary for Political Affairs, with responsibility for Asia. Ambassador Kartman joined the Department of State in 1975 after completion of a graduate program at Georgetown University in Washington, D. C. He is a multiple winner of the Department's Superior Honor Award and, in 1990, the James Clement Dunn Award for Outstanding service. In 1998, Ambassador Kartman was a recipient of the ICAS Liberty Award. He is married to Mary Kartman, a fellow graduate of Knox College in Galesburg, Illinois. They have two daughters. ICAS Web Site Links for Charles Kartman:


AP Wire | 06/22/2006 | N.Korea talks bid nixed; Japan sends ships

www.sanluisobispo.com [cached]

Charles Kartman, a State Department Asia expert during the Clinton administration, said that the United States failed to follow up on talks that secured an agreement with North Korea to suspend its long-range missile tests.Kartman, who represented the United States in talks with North Korea in the late 1990s, said the Bush administration had little interest in dealing directly with Pyongyang."I never understood why they didn't pick up that negotiation," he said Wednesday.


USATODAY.com - U.S. rejects N. Korea's call for talks on missile

www.usatoday.com [cached]

Charles Kartman, a State Department Asia expert during the Clinton administration, said that the United States failed to follow up on talks that secured an agreement with North Korea to suspend its long-range missile tests. Kartman, who represented the United States in talks with North Korea in the late 1990s, said the Bush administration had little interest in dealing directly with Pyongyang. "I never understood why they didn't pick up that negotiation," he said Wednesday.


U.S. head of N. Korea nuclear consortium let go - Yahoo! News

story.news.yahoo.com [cached]

The executive director, Charles Kartman, a former U.S. negotiator with the North, has been a strong proponent of discussions with the isolated communist state and has long been viewed with suspicion by key members of the Bush administration." /> European Union, has asked Kartman to stay on for three months while a successor is chosen.The board "expressed its gratitude for Ambassador Kartman's willingness to stay on during a transition period," one KEDO source said.Kartman could not be reached for comment."They have had difficulty killing it outright and too much resistance from the (U.S.) allies, so now they are killing it softly" by forcing Kartman out of KEDO, one Kartman partisan said.Kartman, a 26-year career U.S. diplomat with a specialty in East Asia, joined KEDO as executive director in May 2001.Prior to that he was U.S. special envoy for the Korean peace talks and concurrently served as U.S. representative to and chairman of KEDO's executive board, until retiring from the State Department in April 2001. Email Story Reuters Photo: Executive director of the Korean Energy Development Organisation (KEDO) Charles Kartman talks to South Korean ...


U.S. head of N. Korea nuclear consortium let go

au.news.yahoo.com [cached]

The executive director, Charles Kartman, a former U.S. negotiator with the North, has been a strong proponent of discussions with the isolated communist state and has long been viewed with suspicion by key members of the Bush administration.The board of the consortium -- the Korean Peninsula Energy Development Organization or KEDO -- decided at its board meeting on Tuesday not to renew Kartman's contract, which was up in April, KEDO sources said.The board, which includes representatives of South Korea, Japan and the European Union, has asked Kartman to stay on for three months while a successor is chosen. Kartman could not be reached for comment."They have had difficulty killing it outright and too much resistance from the (U.S.) allies, so now they are killing it softly" by forcing Kartman out of KEDO, one Kartman partisan said.Kartman, a 26-year career U.S. diplomat with a specialty in East Asia, joined KEDO as executive director in May 2001.Prior to that he was U.S. special envoy for the Korean peace talks and concurrently served as U.S. representative to and chairman of KEDO's executive board, until retiring from the State Department in April 2001.


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