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Wrong Charles Howe?

Charles W. Howe

Professor Emeritus of Economics

University of Colorado , Boulder

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

University of Colorado , Boulder

Background Information

Employment History

University of Colorado at Boulder , United States


Affiliations

Colorado University

Professor Emeritus of Economics


Institute of Behavioral Science at the University of Colorado-Boulder

Professor Emeritus of Economics and A Member of the Professional Staff


Panel

Member


Water Science and Technology Board

Chair, Committee


Education

Massachusetts Agricultural College


doctorate

College of Wooster


Web References(76 Total References)


A Price for the Priceless

www.coloradowatertrust.org [cached]

"You don't want people using water that costs $10 per gallon to produce on applications for which they place a value of a dollar or two," says Chuck Howe, a professor emeritus of economics at the University of Colorado, Boulder.
Howe believes that charging customers for the scarcity value of their water could have a similarly virtuous effect on consumption-and thus on water rates-over the long haul. By increasing the price of each 1,000 gallons of water by just $1.50, Howe and Nichols surmise, the City of Boulder could earn $20 million per year, a sum equivalent to 5 percent of its $400 million water rights portfolio.


news.kgnu.org

Charles Howe, Professor Emeritus in the Department of Economics, Institute of Behavioral Science at the University of Colorado-Boulder has written several articles and books on pricing water and how it might influence consumer behavior.
http://www.kgnu.org/audio/news/2016/09/9-2-16%20Chuck%20Howe.mp3 Chuck Howe Charles Howe, Professor Emeritus, Department of Economics , Institute of Behavioral Science, University of Colorado-Boulder. "We don't charge enough for our urban water really, because a typical water utility being publicly owned, simply doesn't not charge the customer for the value of the raw water that they're treating and then providing to the customer." He recently co-authored an (unpublished) report on water utilities not listing the value of the water rights as part of the assets on which they can earn a return. Some utilities like Boulder and Denver own senior water rights worth in the millions of dollars. "Most urban utilities do have a portfolio of water rights. These water rights typically have very high value, and the value of these water rights greatly exceeds the value of the physical plants and the pipelines and stuff owned by most utilities and yet these water rights are generally not recognized in setting prices for water for urban users. If an urban water utility is privately owned and falls under the jurisdiction of the PUC, presumably a privately owned for profit water utility is allowed to earn a certain percentage return on the value of their assets and yet these utilities do not list the value of the water rights as part of the assets on which they can earn a return." Howe says the value of the water rights is not passed along in terms of cost to the consumer. Rather, water bills reflect the cost of service. "The prices instead reflect the cost of gathering water, treating it and distributing it but not the value of the raw water itself." Howe says as urban areas in Colorado continue to grow, there is little debate on where the water they need will come from.


Water Law Experts - Water Report Editors David C. Moon and David Light: Water Law and Water Quality expert on water rights, water quality and water solution news and information, water law experts, water right experts, water quality experts, water enginee

www.thewaterreport.com [cached]

Charles W. Howe is Professor Emeritus of Economics at the University of Colorado, Boulder.
He chaired the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board's Committee on Privatization of Water Services in the United States. After serving as a law clerk to the administrative judges at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Mr. Howe has been in private practice since 1987, focusing primarily on the natural gas industry.


Water Report Editors David C. Moon and David Light for water rights, water quality and water solution information

www.thewaterreport.com [cached]

Charles W. Howe is Professor Emeritus of Economics at the University of Colorado, Boulder.He chaired the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board's Committee on Privatization of Water Services in the United States.


Past Recipients by Award - University Council on Water Resources

ucowr.org [cached]

2003 - Dr. Charles Howe, University of Colorado


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