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Wrong Charles Haskell?

Charles N. Haskell

Governor

Oklahoma

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Oklahoma

Find other employees at this company (102,105)

Background Information

Employment History

50megs.com


Governor

state of Oklahoma


Affiliations

Oklahoma Constitutional Convention

Member


Web References(156 Total References)


State

www.distinctlyoklahoma.com [cached]

Charles N. Haskell was the very first state Governor of Oklahoma.
The hole week preceding November 16th were filled with festivities.


BatesLine: Tulsa::CityHall Archives

www.batesline.com [cached]

C. N. Haskell, Oklahoma's first governor, is on the list, too -- he signed the state's Jim Crow laws and is the namesake of Haskell St.


BatesLine: Tulsa::History Archives

www.batesline.com [cached]

The Boston Beer Garden was part of a cluster of small shops centering around the Five Points intersection at Haskell Street (now John Hope Franklin Blvd.), Main Street, and Boulder Avenue, and extending east along Haskell to Boston, the retail focus of the southern end of Tulsa's Near Northside neighborhood.
C. N. Haskell, Oklahoma's first governor, is on the list, too -- he signed the state's Jim Crow laws and is the namesake of Haskell St. The name crossed out in favor of Haskell is illegible -- an eight-character name presumably beginning with "H". (UPDATE: Paul Uttinger has learned from contemporary newspaper accounts of the debate that the originally proposed "H" street was "Hiawatha. Charles N. Haskell was the first governor of Oklahoma.


Governor Mary Fallin's inaugural address

www.capitolbeatok.com [cached]

On November 16, 1907, Oklahomans gathered in Guthrie on the steps of the Carnegie Library in much warmer conditions than today to witness the historic inauguration of Oklahoma's first Governor, Charles Nathaniel Haskell.


Middle States Oil Corporation - American Oil & Gas Historical Society

aoghs.org [cached]

Already a successful lawyer, railroad promoter, and politician, Charles Haskell ventured into the Indian Territory in 1901 looking for business opportunities.
He advocated statehood and when it came in 1907, Haskell became Oklahoma's first governor. He is remembered by some as a progressive Democrat who introduced child labor statutes and graduated income tax; by others as a supporter of Jim Crow laws who took bribes from Standard Oil Company. In 1911, after leaving the governor's office in Oklahoma City - had moved the capitol from Guthrie one night in 1910 - Haskell went to work for Harry F. Sinclair "investigating and negotiating for properties in the oil fields of the state. However, by the end of 1923, Haskell's business was in trouble with investors. Haskell, who conducted the market operations of the stock, resigned as chairman of Middle States Oil after the company had acquired control of Southern States Oil. "The receivership grew out of the collapse of the system of oil, railroad, and land companies, security and holding companies, controlled by C. N. Haskell, formerly governor of Oklahoma," court documents reported. "The system had comprised some fifty-five corporations, of which Middle States Oil Corporation and thirty-eight others which were, in August 1924, wholly or partly owned by Middle States Oil directly or through sub-holding companies, eventually were placed in receivership in this District." The receivers were faced with about 90 lawsuits against the former governor's corporations and $15 million in federal tax claims, "based upon the false-and-inflated earnings statements which Haskell had caused to be issued to aid in sales of securities of the companies. Stockholders lost their investment and their stock certificates became worthless. It would be 1952 before a final U.S. District Court decision resolved the matter, but Charles Nathaniel Haskell had died in 1933 at the age of 73, still in the oil business, leaving the complications behind.


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