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Wrong Charles Gati?

Charles Gati

Teacher

Columbia University

HQ Phone:  (212) 305-2500

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Columbia University

161 Fort Washington Avenue

New York City, New York,10032

United States

Company Description

A leading academic and research university, Columbia University continually seeks to advance the frontiers of knowledge and to foster a campus community deeply engaged in understanding and addressing the complex global issues of our time. Columbia University's...more

Background Information

Employment History

Teacher

Union College


Senior Adjunct Professor of Russian and Eurasian Studies

SAIS


Hungarian-born American Political Scientist, Professor of International Relations

Johns Hopkins University


Senior Research Professor of European and Eurasian Studies

The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies


Affiliations

Foreign Policy Institute

Senior Fellow


Aspen Institute Berlin

Board of Trustees Member


U.S. Department of State's Policy Planning Staff

Senior Member


U.S. Department of State

Senior Member of the Policy Planning Staff


Education

PhD

international relations

Indiana University


Web References(183 Total References)


The World in Transition Release Event | The SAIS Review of International Affairs

www.saisreview.org [cached]

Charles Gati is a Foreign Policy Institute Senior Fellow at Johns Hopkins SAIS.
He was a senior adjunct professor of Russian and Eurasian studies at SAIS. He served as a senior adviser with the Policy Planning Staff of the U.S. Department of State. He also taught at Union College and Columbia University. His publications include The Bloc That Failed: Soviet-East Relations in Transition and Hungary and the Soviet Bloc. Dr. Gati received his PhD in international relations from Indiana University.


cima.ned.org

Charles Gati
Johns Hopkins University Charles Gati is a professorial lecturer and interim director of Russian and Eurasian Studies and a Foreign Policy Institute senior fellow at Johns Hopkins University's School of Advanced International Studies. A professor emeritus at Union College, he has also taught at Columbia University and has served as a senior member of the policy planning staff at the U.S. Department of State. Gati has written extensively on European-Russian relations, including in Foreign Affairs. He is the author of Failed Illusions: Moscow, Washington, Budapest and the 1956 Hungarian Revolt and Hungary and the Soviet Bloc, both of which have received the Marshall Shulman Book Prize for outstanding book on the international relations of the former Soviet bloc.


www.sup.org

Charles Gati"Gati's book towers high above the rest as by far the best book published on 1956... his work aims to examine what happened and to point to what could have happened given the other complex factors that were in play in 1956.The fruit of Gati's effort is an engaging, fascinating, and well-written narrative coupled wit masterful historical and political analysis."—Slavic Review"This important work deepens our knowledge of events through scores of new documentary findings, filling in fascinating details about events, decisions, and key players' personal philosophies and points of view.It's the only book of its kind."—Malcolm Byrne, Deputy Director and Director of Research, National Security Archive"Gati draws on a wealth of archival evidence and personal interviews to produce a remarkably readable and provocative essay, rich in astute observations and illuminating anecdotes, and leavened by fragments of his personal and intellectual history."—International History Review"Gati draws on reams of new research and documentary evidence from Hungary, while ferreting out scores of fascinating documents from the U.S. archives."Gati's book is eminently worth reading.Whether or not one agrees with his views and conclusions, it is a most valuable contribution to the scholarly literature on the subject."—Russian Review"The main message on U.S. foreign policy in Gati's book resonates with me. We're forever spouting bullshit in foreign policy for domestic political reasons at great costs to people abroad, who take the bullshit seriously."—Leslie Gelb, President Emeritus, Council on Foreign Relations and former foreign-affairs columnist, New York TimesCharles Gati provides a suspenseful inside look into the types of issues and characters le Carre has portrayed in his novels yet Gati's story is all too real and tragic.""Failed Illusions sheds new light on American policy, especially the controversial role of Radio Free Europe as it encouraged the rebels....[and] Mr. Gati's excellent footnotes, several quite personal and poignant, give added depth to the story."—The Economist"Charles Gati's Failed Illusions is a searching, scholarly account of the political calculations of the Kremlin, the White House, and the Hungarian Communist leadership."—New York Times Book Review"This book is a multilayered treatement of complex quetions in the history of the United State, the USSR, Hungary, the Cold War, and international realtions in general, and it will set the direction of discussion for a long time to come."—American Historical Review"The product of more than 15 years of extraordinary research and interviewing, much of it in Hungarian, his book highlights just how much we have to learn about key Cold War events and, more important, how we should go about learning it."—Foreign Affairs"Charles Gati's Failed Illusions is an outstanding work."—London Review of Books"The '56-anniversary book that's gotten the most press is Charles Gati's Failed Illusions, which, in meticulous scholarly detail, fortifies the new, more depressing argument for why America didn't ride to the rescue with either military might or aggressive diplomacy."—BOOKFORUM"Gati has undertaken an important, brilliant reappraisal of the 1956 Hungarian uprising and its subsequent violent suppression.Scholars of the Cold War, Hungarian history, and anyone interested in the popular revolution will be spellbound by this book."—CHOICE"Charles Gatis Failed Illusions gives a comprehensive account of the Revolution in succinct and elegant prose along with his own analysis and some speculation."—New York Review of Books"The main message on U.S. foreign policy in Gati's book resonates with me. We're forever spouting bullshit in foreign policy for domestic political reasons at great costs to people abroad, who take the bullshit seriously."But now, fifty years later, the simplicity of this David and Goliath story should be revisited, according to Charles Gati's new history of the revolt.Charles Gati is a political scientist who fled his native Hungary during the 1956 revolt, and is now Senior Adjunct Professor of European Studies at Johns Hopkins University.His previous positions have included teaching Central and Eastern European as well as Russian politics and foreign policy at Union College and Columbia University.He served as a Senior Adviser on the Department of State's Policy Planning Staff in the early 1990's.His publications include The Bloc That Failed: Soviet-East Relations in Transition (1990), and Hungary and the Soviet Bloc (1986).


Failed Illusions: Moscow, Washington, Budapest, and the 1956 Hungarian Revolt - Charles Gati

www.sup.org [cached]

Charles GatiCharles Gati is a political scientist who fled his native Hungary during the 1956 revolt, and is now Senior Adjunct Professor of European Studies at Johns Hopkins University.His previous positions have included teaching Central and Eastern European as well as Russian politics and foreign policy at Union College and Columbia University.He served as a Senior Adviser on the Department of State's Policy Planning Staff in the early 1990's.His publications include The Bloc That Failed: Soviet-East Relations in Transition (1990), and Hungary and the Soviet Bloc (1986)."Gati's book towers high above the rest as by far the best book published on 1956... his work aims to examine what happened and to point to what could have happened given the other complex factors that were in play in 1956.The fruit of Gati's effort is an engaging, fascinating, and well-written narrative coupled wit masterful historical and political analysis.",Slavic Review"This important work deepens our knowledge of events through scores of new documentary findings, filling in fascinating details about events, decisions, and key players' personal philosophies and points of view.It's the only book of its kind.",Malcolm Byrne, Deputy Director and Director of Research, National Security Archive"Gati draws on a wealth of archival evidence and personal interviews to produce a remarkably readable and provocative essay, rich in astute observations and illuminating anecdotes, and leavened by fragments of his personal and intellectual history.",International History Review"Gati draws on reams of new research and documentary evidence from Hungary, while ferreting out scores of fascinating documents from the U.S. archives."Gati's book is eminently worth reading.Whether or not one agrees with his views and conclusions, it is a most valuable contribution to the scholarly literature on the subject.",Russian Review"The main message on U.S. foreign policy in Gati's book resonates with me. We're forever spouting bullshit in foreign policy for domestic political reasons at great costs to people abroad, who take the bullshit seriously.",Leslie Gelb, President Emeritus, Council on Foreign Relations and former foreign-affairs columnist, New York TimesCharles Gati provides a suspenseful inside look into the types of issues and characters le Carre has portrayed in his novels yet Gati's story is all too real and tragic.""Failed Illusions sheds new light on American policy, especially the controversial role of Radio Free Europe as it encouraged the rebels....[and] Mr. Gati's excellent footnotes, several quite personal and poignant, give added depth to the story.",The Economist"Charles Gati's Failed Illusions is a searching, scholarly account of the political calculations of the Kremlin, the White House, and the Hungarian Communist leadership.",New York Times Book Review"This book is a multilayered treatement of complex quetions in the history of the United State, the USSR, Hungary, the Cold War, and international realtions in general, and it will set the direction of discussion for a long time to come.",American Historical Review"The product of more than 15 years of extraordinary research and interviewing, much of it in Hungarian, his book highlights just how much we have to learn about key Cold War events and, more important, how we should go about learning it.",Foreign Affairs"Charles Gati's Failed Illusions is an outstanding work.",London Review of Books"The '56-anniversary book that's gotten the most press is Charles Gati's Failed Illusions, which, in meticulous scholarly detail, fortifies the new, more depressing argument for why America didn't ride to the rescue with either military might or aggressive diplomacy.",BOOKFORUM"Gati has undertaken an important, brilliant reappraisal of the 1956 Hungarian uprising and its subsequent violent suppression.Scholars of the Cold War, Hungarian history, and anyone interested in the popular revolution will be spellbound by this book.",CHOICE"Charles Gatis Failed Illusions gives a comprehensive account of the Revolution in succinct and elegant prose along with his own analysis and some speculation.",New York Review of Books"The main message on U.S. foreign policy in Gati's book resonates with me. We're forever spouting bullshit in foreign policy for domestic political reasons at great costs to people abroad, who take the bullshit seriously."But now, fifty years later, the simplicity of this David and Goliath story should be revisited, according to Charles Gati's new history of the revolt.


Untitled Document

www.roembus.org [cached]

CHARLES GATI · Discussant for the panel Marxist Revisionism, Dissent and the Struggle for Civil Society
Biography: Adjunct Professor of Russian and Eurasian Studies, School of Advanced International Studies/Johns Hopkins University. Formerly a senior advisor with the policy planning staff of the U.S. Department of State and professor at Union College and Columbia University. He is the author of Hungary and the Soviet Bloc (1986), for which he received his first Marshall Shulman Book Award in 1987, TheBloc that Failed (1990), and several other books as well as numerous articles in publications including Foreign Affairs and The New York Times. A study titled "If not Democracy, What? was published in 1997. His latest book -- Failed Illusions: Moscow, Washington, Budapest, and the 1956 Hungarian revolt -- appeared in 2006 in English, Hungarian, Polish, Slovak, and Russian and was awarded Dr. Gati's second Marshall Shulman Book Award in 2007.


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