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Wrong Charles Branscomb?

Charles E. Branscomb

Customer Engineer

IBM Corporation

HQ Phone:  (914) 499-1900

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

IBM Corporation

1 New Orchard Rd

Armonk, New York,10504

United States

Company Description

IBM is a globally integrated technology and consulting company headquartered in Armonk, New York. With operations in more than 170 countries, IBM attracts and retains some of the world's most talented people to help solve problems and provide an edge for busin...more

Background Information

Employment History

Vice President

TeleCommunication Systems , Inc.


Web References(6 Total References)


www.ed-thelen.org

" ... pictures taken of Chuck Branscomb, Jim Ingram and myself in Raleigh, NC on 2/21/09.
Charles Branscomb's career at IBM spanned 39 years, where he developed and managed several successful IBM products, including the IBM 1401 data processing system, enterprise systems (System/360) and several mid-range systems. Charles joined IBM in the Endicott, NY lab in August 1950 to design punched card handling and unit record products. In 1957 he became Area Manager for accounting machines and directed the development of the IBM 1401. After various executive staff positions, in 1964 he became Director of Computer Assisted Instruction and in 1966, President of the Systems Development Division with eight US labs and six European labs, managing delivery and expansion of the System/360 product line. In 1971 he joined the Corporate Technical Committee investigating future technologies; in 1973 became Director of Engineering, Programming, and Technology; and in 1974 became VP Development and Manufacturing of the General Systems Division in Atlanta, responsible for Systems 32, 34, 38, Series 1, and the IBM PC. In 1983 he became VP of Telecommunication Systems in Communications Product Division in Raleigh. After his retirement in 1986, he consulted full-time to IBM for 3 additional years and then spent more than a dozen years volunteering at North Carolina State University with two adjunct appointments in its College of Engineering. Charles received a MSME from North Carolina State University in 1950. Charles E. Branscomb Joined IBM in August, 1950 after getting my BS & MS degrees in Mechanical Engineering from N.C. State. Chuck Branscomb is shown in the back row, 6th from the left. I was involved in the development of the first transisterized units in the Endicott Glendale Lab - the PECU (Print Edit Control Unit) & TAM (Transister Accountng Machine) prior to the 1401 team being pulled together under Chuck Branscomb. When the 1401 team was pulled together under Chuck, I worked first for Rus Raleigh and then Joe Conzola under Jim Ingrahm, who inturn reported to Chuck. When the 1401 team was pulled together under Chuck, I worked first for Rus Raleigh and then Joe Conzola under Jim Ingrahm, who inturn reported to Chuck. This would be better addressed by Fran, Jim Ingram, and Chuck Branscomb, as I was so mired in the details that my perception may be some what off base.


www.ithistory.org [cached]

Mr. Charles (Chuck) Branscomb
Mr. Charles (Chuck) Branscomb He spent 39 years at IBM, where he developed and managed several successful products, including the IBM 1401 Data Processing System, the IBM System/360 and several mid-range systems. He was born in Carroll County, Virginia, but in the middle of the Depression, about 1933, his father moved the family to Winston-Salem, North Carolina. He began attending North Carolina State University in the fall of 1943, studying mechanical engineering, but in March of 1946, he was drafted into the Army. After basic training at Ft. Knox, Kentucky, he was deployed to Korea. He was assigned to the Machine Records Unit (MRU), IBM Installation where he had his first exposure to IBM Equipment. He was there for 12 months and once a month an IBM customer engineer from Tokyo came to ensure all the machines were in perfect order. He took the opportunity to talk with the engineer and learned a lot about IBM which piqued his interest in the company. Later this engineer was instrumental in his being employed at IBM. In the fall of 1947, he was discharged from the Army and returned to school at NC State. He received his Bachelor’s degree in 1949 and his Master’s degree in Mechanical Engineering in 1950. He joined the IBM Endicott, NY, lab in August 1950, to design punched card handling and unit record products. In 1957, he became Area Manager for accounting machines where he would direct the development of the groundbreaking IBM 1401 system. After various executive staff positions, in 1964 he became Director of Computer Assisted Instruction and in 1966, President of the Systems Development Division with eight US labs and six European labs, managing delivery and expansion of the System/360 product line. In 1971 he joined the Corporate Technical Committee investigating future technologies; in 1973 became Director of Engineering, Programming, and Technology; and in 1974 became Vice President of Development and Manufacturing of the General Systems Division in Atlanta, responsible for Systems 32, 34, 38, Series 1, and the IBM PC. In 1983 he became VP of Telecommunication Systems in the Communications Product Division in Raleigh. After his retirement in 1986, he consulted full-time to IBM for 3 additional years and then spent more than a dozen years volunteering at North Carolina State University with two adjunct appointments in its College of Engineering. Charles received a MSME from North Carolina State University in 1950.


www.ctandi.org

Charles Branscomb spent 39 years at IBM, where he developed and managed several successful products, including the IBM 1401 Data Processing System, the IBM System/360 and several mid-range systems.
Charles joined the IBM Endicott, NY, lab in August 1950, to design punched card handling and unit record products. In 1957, he became area manager for accounting machines where he would direct the development of the groundbreaking IBM 1401 system. After various executive positions, in 1966, Branscomb was named president of the Systems Development Division with eight U.S. labs and six European labs, managing delivery and expansion of the System/360 product line. In 1974, Branscomb became vice president of development and manufacturing of the General Systems Division in Atlanta, and became responsible for System/32, System/34, System/38, Series/1 and the IBM PC. After his retirement in 1986, Charles spent more than a dozen years volunteering at North Carolina State University with two adjunct appointments in its College of Engineering. Source -- IBM100 - IBM 1401: The Mainframe Charles Branscomb


media.primezone.com [cached]

Live demonstrations will be staged throughout the evening and guests will hear the story of the restoration from IBM Restoration Project Lead, Robert Garner and IBM 1401 Program Manager, Chuck Branscomb, who led the IBM 1401's original development beginning in 1957.
Funding for the IBM 1401 restoration project and Demo Lab was provided by various major donors including Gardner Hendrie and Karen Johansen, Dorrit and Grant Saviers, IBM Corporation, Robin Beresford and Robert Garner, Donna Dubinsky and Len Shustek, Jack and Casey Carsten, David E. Liddle and Ruthann Quindlen, John and Sheree Shoch, Ronald C. Crane, Bernard L. Peuto and Anne Bertaud-Peuto, Mike Cheponis, Allen and Barbara Palmer, Ron Williams, Steve Wozniak, Charles E. Branscomb and Robert and Roxanne Brubaker.


www.computerhistory.org [cached]

Jon Iwata, Charles Branscomb, Sheldon Jacobs, Robert Garner, and Francis Underwood
- Charles Branscomb, IBM 1401 Program Manager, 1957 - 1960


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