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Catherine F. Clarke

Professor and Chair

UCLA

HQ Phone:  (310) 443-7000

Direct Phone: (310) ***-****direct phone

Email: c***@***.edu

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

UCLA

325 Westwood Plaza

Los Angeles, California,90095

United States

Company Description

UCLA Anderson Forecast is one of the most widely watched and often-cited economic outlooks for California and the nation and was unique in predicting both the seriousness of the early-1990s downturn in California and the strength of the state's rebound since 1...more

Web References(72 Total References)


Search results

www.surfsafely.com [cached]

Dr Pamela L Larsen and Dr Catherine F Clarke of the University of California Los Angeles have made an amazing discovery Judged by the potential of their discovery to relieve human suffering they may be our next Nobel Laureates Their work may have


esciencenews.com

The biochemists, led by UCLA chemistry and biochemistry professor Catherine Clarke, have developed a new method for increasing the stability of polyunsaturated fatty acids.
They have discovered a way to make these molecules harder to break apart so that oxidation is less likely to occur, rather than relying on antioxidants to repair damage after it occurs. "These compounds (polyunsaturated fatty acids) are so important, yet so fragile," Clarke said. In the research, Clarke and her colleagues show that polyunsaturated fatty acids can be strengthened by replacing their most vulnerable hydrogen atoms, which are easily stripped away, with much more stable deuterium, an isotope of hydrogen with one extra neutron. The result is the creation of a fatty acid that serves the same function as its predecessor, but without the same susceptibility to oxidation. The biochemists also describe applying this reinforcement process to two essential dietary fatty acids and show that yeast cells treated with the reinforced polyunsaturated fatty acids are much more resistant to oxidative stress than yeast treated with normal polyunsaturated fatty acids. "You can think about polyunsaturated fatty acids like an oil-based paint," Clarke said. "When you spread the oil-based paint on the wall, it turns into a hard coat of enamel. That happens because of an oxidation reaction. A hard coat of enamel is great for a wall but lousy for a cell membrane. Cells have to deal with damage continually and have to be able to repair the damage that results from the oxidation." Clarke's research team included four UCLA undergraduates: lead author Shauna Hill, who worked in Clarke's laboratory as many as 70 hours a week and earned a bachelor's degree in biochemistry in June; Bradley Kay; Vincent Tse; and Kathleen Hirano, who graduated from UCLA in 2009 with a bachelor's in biochemistry and is now a graduate student at UC Berkeley. "Shauna, with Kathleen, Bradley and Vincent, tested fatty acids in yeast mutants that lacked the antioxidant coenzyme Q, where we know they are very sensitive to stress," Clarke said. Fish oil has 10 hydrogen atoms that are vulnerable and could be reinforced to be made less likely to degrade, Clarke noted. Reinforced polyunsaturated fatty acids potentially could create membranes that are at least somewhat resilient to oxidative damage, Clarke said. Antioxidants are like a mop-up crew, Clarke said. After the hydrogen atoms are pulled off, antioxidants stop the harmful chain reaction. Using another analogy, Clarke said, "Instead of taking an antioxidant to jump in front of a bullet, you place bullet-proof vests on the hydrogen atoms." While wild yeast are resistant to oxidation at room temperature, they do begin to experience stress as the temperature rises. At high temperatures, wild yeast colonies treated with deuterium-reinforced polyunsaturated fatty acids show much greater resilience than those treated with unmodified fatty acids - a result that indicates that even cells with integrated antioxidant mechanisms can benefit from the addition of deuterium-enhanced fatty acids, Clarke said. Clarke described working with the students as "fantastic, so much fun." The students returned the praise of their mentors. "Working in Professor Clarke's laboratory has been a life-changing experience for me," said Hill, who is applying to graduate schools in biochemistry and cellular and molecular biology. "Conducting research in Professor Clarke's laboratory is an amazing opportunity," Tse said.


www.ellisonfoundation.org

Dr. Catherine F. Clarke
University of California - Los Angeles


Welcome to Salmonpeople

www.peterdonaldson.net [cached]

- Catherine F. Clarke, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, UCLA


Biochemists develop new method for preventing oxidative damage to cells

www.physorg.com [cached]

Catherine Clarke and UCLA researchers
(PhysOrg.com) -- The discovery by UCLA biochemists of a new method for preventing oxidation in the essential fatty acids of cell membranes could lead to a new class of more effective nutritional supplements and potentially help combat neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease and perhaps Alzheimer's. While polyunsaturated fatty acids are essential nutrients for everything from brain function to cell function, they are the most vulnerable components in human cells because of their high sensitivity to oxidative modifications caused by highly reactive oxygen molecules in the body. The biochemists, led by UCLA chemistry and biochemistry professor Catherine Clarke, have developed a new method for increasing the stability of polyunsaturated fatty acids. They have discovered a way to make these molecules harder to break apart so that oxidation is less likely to occur, rather than relying on antioxidants to repair damage after it occurs. "These compounds (polyunsaturated fatty acids) are so important, yet so fragile," Clarke said. In the research, Clarke and her colleagues show that polyunsaturated fatty acids can be strengthened by replacing their most vulnerable hydrogen atoms, which are easily stripped away, with much more stable deuterium, an isotope of hydrogen with one extra neutron. The result is the creation of a fatty acid that serves the same function as its predecessor, but without the same susceptibility to oxidation. The biochemists also describe applying this reinforcement process to two essential dietary fatty acids and show that yeast cells treated with the reinforced polyunsaturated fatty acids are much more resistant to oxidative stress than yeast treated with normal polyunsaturated fatty acids. "You can think about polyunsaturated fatty acids like an oil-based paint," Clarke said. "When you spread the oil-based paint on the wall, it turns into a hard coat of enamel. That happens because of an oxidation reaction. A hard coat of enamel is great for a wall but lousy for a cell membrane. Cells have to deal with damage continually and have to be able to repair the damage that results from the oxidation." Clarke's research team included four UCLA undergraduates: lead author Shauna Hill, who worked in Clarke's laboratory as many as 70 hours a week and earned a bachelor's degree in biochemistry in June; Bradley Kay; Vincent Tse; and Kathleen Hirano, who graduated from UCLA in 2009 with a bachelor's in biochemistry and is now a graduate student at UC Berkeley. "Shauna, with Kathleen, Bradley and Vincent, tested fatty acids in yeast mutants that lacked the antioxidant coenzyme Q, where we know they are very sensitive to stress," Clarke said. Fish oil has 10 hydrogen atoms that are vulnerable and could be reinforced to be made less likely to degrade, Clarke noted. Reinforced polyunsaturated fatty acids potentially could create membranes that are at least somewhat resilient to oxidative damage, Clarke said. Antioxidants are like a mop-up crew, Clarke said. After the hydrogen atoms are pulled off, antioxidants stop the harmful chain reaction. Using another analogy, Clarke said, "Instead of taking an antioxidant to jump in front of a bullet, you place bullet-proof vests on the hydrogen atoms." While wild yeast are resistant to oxidation at room temperature, they do begin to experience stress as the temperature rises. At high temperatures, wild yeast colonies treated with deuterium-reinforced polyunsaturated fatty acids show much greater resilience than those treated with unmodified fatty acids — a result that indicates that even cells with integrated antioxidant mechanisms can benefit from the addition of deuterium-enhanced fatty acids, Clarke said. Clarke described working with the students as "fantastic, so much fun." The students returned the praise of their mentors. "Working in Professor Clarke's laboratory has been a life-changing experience for me," said Hill, who is applying to graduate schools in biochemistry and cellular and molecular biology. "Conducting research in Professor Clarke's laboratory is an amazing opportunity," Tse said.


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