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Wrong Casey Burns?

Casey Burns

Wildlife Biologist

Bureau of Land Management

HQ Phone:  (202) 452-5125

Email: c***@***.gov

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Bureau of Land Management

1849 C ST NW

Washington, D.C., District of Columbia,20240

United States

Company Description

About the BLM - The BLM manages more land - over 245 million acres - than any other Federal agency. This land, known as the National System of Public Lands, is primarily located in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The Bureau, with a budget of about $1 bill... more

Find other employees at this company (9,154)

Background Information

Web References(33 Total References)


Desert Dispatch - Full Story

www.desertdispatch.com [cached]

In addition to hiring Foster, Read hired Casey Burns, who was a wildlife biologist at the field office until leaving late last year for a new job in Ventura County.Burns had previously been an intern in BLM's Needles field office.


Study: Ravens a threat to desert tortoises

www.vvdailypress.com [cached]

"We at the Bureau of Land Management are eagerly listening to this study and the results," said BLM wildlife biologist Casey Burns."We're trying to work at getting to the bottom of all this.Then we can plan a course of action."Burns said the raven population has increased by 1,000 percent over the past 25 years.And because in other parts of the country they migrate, they're protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act."It's really a sticky situation because you can't go out and kill them," he said.Burns said people have made the ravens an increasing factor."The ravens are here because the people are here," he said.


Desert Dispatch - Full Story

www.desertdispatch.com [cached]

U.S. Bureau of Land Management Wildlife Biologist Casey Burns discusses his efforts to pump water back into Harper Dry Lake after the marsh there dried up this summer.The U.S. Bureau of Land Management has started to pump water back into Harper Dry Lake, which has gone from wet to dry to wet again in recent years.BLM's Barstow field office, which restored the dry lake this spring to a marsh-like oasis for birds, stopped pumping into the lake bed this summer to conserve water.By September, the water had dried up, and BLM couldn't afford to pay the electric bill for the pumping until after the start of the new federal fiscal year Oct. 1, BLM Wildlife Biologist Casey Burns said.The lake bed is still dry, but there are a couple shallow ponds at the Harper Dry Lake site.Burns said he hopes to have the lake bed filled with shallow water again within a couple weeks.On Wednesday, several egrets could be seen alongside one of the ponds, but they were the only birds at the lake area.Burns said birds should gradually start to return after enough water is back."The No. 1 reason for this is as a stopover for migration," Burns said.Burns said the BLM had always planned to turn off the water in the summer, because too much water would be lost to evaporation during the hottest months.Since the lake bed dried up, Burns said he's gotten several complaints from people who went there hoping to find water and birds.Although water should draw birds back, Burns said plenty of work still lies ahead to make Harper Dry Lake a perfectly balanced ecosystem.There needs to be adequate food for larger birds, and BLM is evaluating what type of fish would be good to put in the water, he said.The field office also needs to get a handle on some invasive plant species there that destroy native plants and have no redeeming value, he said.Since the restoration this spring, BLM has retained "Harper Dry Lake" as the site's official name.Harper Dry Lake had been dry since the late 1990s.


State & Federal Contacts

utahweed.org [cached]

Casey Burns


2014 Year in Review |

bouldercommunityalliance.org [cached]

Casey Burns
Casey Burns' presentation on Pollinators was one of the many educational forums sponsored by BCA in 2014.


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