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Wrong Carol Glaser?

Carol A. Glaser

Chief, Viral and Rickettsial Disease Laboratory Branch

State of California

Direct Phone: (510) ***-****direct phone

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

State of California

Background Information

Employment History

Associate Clinical Professor Pediatrics, Infectious Disease

University of California , San Francisco


Medical Officer

Viral & Rickettsial Disease Laboratory Branch


Chief of the Encephalitis and Special Investigation Section

California Department of Health Services


Web References(78 Total References)


user1834807.sites.myregisteredsite.com

Carol Glaser and Karen C. Bloch
Allan R. Tunkel, Carol A. Glaser, Karen C. Bloch, James I. Sejvar, Christina M. Marra, Karen L. Roos, Barry J. Hartman, Sheldon L. Kaplan, W. Michel Scheld, Richard J. Whitley



www.elmavets.com

Likewise, Dr. Carol Glaser, an MD and DVM in the California Department of Health Services, said she agrees with almost all of DavisÂ's comments, with some caveats.
Â"I donÂ't think itÂ's a simple yes or no (whether to test),Â" Glaser said. Â"ItÂ's going to be highly dependent on which disease is being considered, how sick the human patient is, is it more than one patient, what type of animal is involved and the health status of the animal.Â" Underscoring the need to examine seemingly unrelated events in animal and human health, Glaser pointed to the baffling set of circumstances in New York City that led to the discovery in 1999 of West Nile virus in the United States. Â"There were dead birds on the lawn, people sick and zoo animals sick,Â" she recounted. Â"Nobody knew they were aligned. We didnÂ't even know West Nile virus was here. Having data from veterinary groups helped the people who deal with human medicine put it all together.Â" In her role as chief of the encephalitis and special investigation section of the communicable disease emergency response branch in CaliforniaÂ's Department of Health Services, Glaser said she has at times gone to great lengths to sleuth the source of a disease. One such case occurred last May. An 8-year-old girl contracted rabies, and no one knew how. Her family owned a horse that died five months earlier, presumably of colonic torsion. Â"We actually had the horse dug up and tested,Â" Glaser said. Unfortunately, the Â"brain tissue was not ideal for testing,Â" according to an account in the U.S. Center for Disease ControlÂ's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, and the source of infection remained unknown. Remarkably, the girl survived. While public health threats such as rabies call for aggressive action, Glaser said, other diseases donÂ't warrant the same level of response. In some situations, Glaser said testing is Â"absolutely not warranted.Â" For instance? To allay concerns about toxoplasmosis. As most women whoÂ've ever been pregnant know, cats may shed the parasite Toxoplasma gondii in their feces. Healthy people may pick up and harbor the parasite with no problem, but a first-time exposure in a pregnant woman potentially is devastating to her fetus. However, Glaser said, infected cats typically shed the parasite for only a short period Â- one to two weeks Â- and never again. Chances are much greater that a person will become infected by eating unwashed contaminated vegetables or undercooked meat, she said. In fact, the CDC calls toxoplasmosis Â"the leading cause of death attributed to foodborne illness in the United States.Â" While cats play an important role in the spread of the parasite Â- they are its only known definitive host Â- targeting the household pet is not justified, Glaser and others say.


bdbrainwreck.com [cached]

- Dr. Carol Glaser, MD, DVM, MPVM, Chief of Encephalitis & Special Investigations Section, California Department of Public Health


www.saludhealthinfo.com [cached]

However, Dr. Carol Glaser, Chief of the Viral Disease Laboratory branch at the state Department of Health Services has a few ideas.
People with diabetes and high blood pressure often have weakened blood vessels.


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