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Wrong Carlos Vallbona?

Carlos A. Vallbona

Chairman of the Department of Community Medicine

Baylor College of Medicine

HQ Phone:  (713) 798-4951

Direct Phone: (713) ***-****direct phone

Email: v***@***.edu

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Baylor College of Medicine

One Baylor Plaza, Room 176B

Houston, Texas,77030

United States

Company Description

Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas is recognized as a premier academic health sciences center and is known for excellence in education, research and patient care. It is the only private medical school in the greater southwest US and is ranked 20th am...more

Web References(151 Total References)


Healthcare for the Homeless-Houston - HHH Board of Directors

www.homeless-healthcare.org [cached]

Carlos Vallbona, MDBaylor College of Medicine


hot

fmscommunity.org [cached]

NO ONE was more skeptical about using magnets for pain relief than Dr. Carlos Vallbona, former chairman of the department of community medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.
So Dr. Vallbona was amazed when a study he did found that small, low intensity magnets worked, at least for patients experiencing symptoms that can develop years after polio. Dr. Vallbona had long been fascinated by testimonials about magnets from his patients, and even from medical leaders. But his interest in magnet therapy became more serious in 1994 when he and a colleague, Carlton F. Hazlewood, tried them for their own knee pain. The pain was gone in minutes. ''That was too good to be true,'' Dr. Vallbona said. Dr. Vallbona knew that the power of suggestion can fool both patient and doctor. But he also wondered: could strapping small, low intensity magnets to the most sensitive areas of the body for several minutes relieve chronic muscular and joint pains among patients in his post-polio clinic at Baylor's Institute for Rehabilitation Research. Aware of the medical profession's skepticism about magnet therapy, Dr. Vallbona sought to conduct science's most rigorous type of study. Participants would agree to allow the investigators to randomly assign them to groups getting treatment with active magnets or sham devices. But neither the patients nor the doctors treating them would know what therapy was used on which patient. First, Dr. Vallbona informally tested magnets on a few patients. One was a priest with post-polio syndrome who celebrated mass with difficulty due to marked back pain that prevented him from raising his left hand. After applying a magnet for a few minutes the pain was gone, Dr. Vallbona recalled, and, ''the priest said this was a miracle.'' Then a human experimentation committee allowed Dr. Vallbona to test 50 volunteers with magnets that at 300 to 500 gauss, were slightly stronger than refrigerator magnets. They were made in different sizes so they could fit over the anatomic area identified as setting off their pain. It was difficult to design a system to prevent participants from learning whether they were being treated with a magnet or a sham. So Dr. Vallbona asked Magnaflex Inc., a magnet manufacturer in Corpus Christi, Tex., to prepare active magnets and inactive devices that could not be told apart. The devices were labeled in code.


Articles - Ace Magnetics Blog

blog.acemagnetics.com [cached]

Carlos Vallbona is the former chairman of the department of community medicine at Baylor College of Medicine.
As a physician, he has treated a large volume of patients experiencing pain. It was during this time that he heard remarkable testimonials about magnets from his patients. In fact, other medical professionals were telling him the same thing about magnets. Like many medical professionals unfamiliar with magnetic health therapy, Dr. Vallbona was initially skeptical about the healing abilities of magnets. However, with a growing number of patients and medical doctors showing support for magnetic therapy, he took it upon himself to find out the truth behind pain relief magnets. Initially, Dr. Vallbona and his colleague, Carlton Hazelwood, Ph.D., used magnets for the pain in their own knee. One of Dr. Vallbona's first patients to be treated with pain relief magnets happened to be a...(click the link for the full story).


Baylor :: Equine Magnetic Therapy

equinemagnetic.com [cached]

Carlos Vallbona, MD, Carlton F. Hazlewood, PhD, Gabor Jurida, MD
From the Department of Family and Community Medicine and the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (Dr. Vallbona) and the Department of Molecular Biology and Biophysics (Drs. Hazlewood, Jurida), Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX. Submitted for publication February 12, 1997. Accepted in revised form April 11, 1997. No commercial party having a direct financial interest in the results of the research supporting this article has or will confer a benefit upon the authors or upon any organization with which the authors are associated. Reprint requests to Carlos Vallbona, MD, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030.


Articles

www.vibrationalenergies4healing.com [cached]

No one was more skeptical about using magnets for pain relief than Dr. Carlos Vallbona, former chairman of the department of community medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.
So Dr. Vallbona was amazed when a study he did found that small, low intensity magnets worked, at least for patients experiencing symptoms that can develop years after polio.


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