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Wrong Carlos Hickman?

Carlos Hickman

Specialty Fabricator (Contract)

CREO Industrial Arts

HQ Phone:  (425) 775-7444

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

CREO Industrial Arts

8329 216th Avenue SE

Woodinville, Washington,98072

United States

Company Description

CREO Industrial Arts is a premier fabricator of environmental graphics and custom architectural signage. Since 1984, CREO has been producing signage and graphics for projects around the country and the globe. As a full service fabricator, CREO Industrial Arts ...more

Background Information

Employment History

Lead Design and Fabricator

Los Labs Automotive Firm Inc


Electronic Engineering Technology Student

Purdue University


Model Maker (Contract)

DAQRI LLC


Web References(15 Total References)


Black community news – LOS Labs Automotive Firm’s Carlos Hickman :

inknewspaper.com [cached]

LOS Labs Automotive Firm's Carlos Hickman sets an example for young and old alike
Carlos Hickman, founder of LOS Labs Automotive Firm Carlos Hickman, owner and founder of LOS Labs Automotive Firm, is a study in contradictions. Even his location is a clash of opposites. "We try to develop new trends and styles here," Hickman says. I do not," Hickman explains. "Most people work to live. I live to work." Hickman's personal drive and philosophy, and the life experiences that molded them, are what make him a worthy role model for young people, as well as for other entrepreneurs of any age. The 30-something Hickman is especially interested in being a positive example to the many young Black males who see crime, rap music or sports as their only avenues to financial success. "You don't have to do the 'streets, beats or cleats thing'," Hickman says. As a teen, Hickman found social life to be yet another challenge. "Girls back then liked the guy who was the athlete, the street hustler or the guy who was great with music. I was never one of those guys," Hickman says. "I wasn't hip. I didn't have money, so I didn't have great clothes. I didn't have a car. It was a lot of 'didn't haves.'" All those early challenges made Hickman determined to succeed through hard work. After graduating from Northrop High School, he attended Purdue University where he majored in electrical engineering. For a time, he worked for defense contractor Lockheed Martin, and in August of 2001, Hickman was prepared to leave the Midwest for a job in Seattle with airplane manufacturer Boeing. However, one month later, Hickman's plans changed forever. On September 11, 2001, the deadliest terrorist attack on U.S. soil shook the nation. While the entire economy was in shambles, the airline industry was particularly devastated. The Boeing job was now questionable at best. In the meantime, Hickman decided to try to make a living out of something that had previously been mainly a hobby. "I'd been doing automotive installs on the side for years," Hickman says. "I always had a love and a passion for it." Hickman flashes a broad smile and a hint of embarrassment when he recalls his first auto assignment: at age 15, he talked his sister into letting him work on her car stereo. After a short time working primarily on commission, Hickman decided his skills could be put to better use working on his own. Combining his education, experience and an $800 loan for tools and rented garage space, Hickman went out on his own. "I didn't want to be the guy who showed up to work one day to find out that his job had been outsourced to Asia. I wanted to control my own destiny," he explains. "If I was going to fail, it was going to be at my own hand." With no actual experience running a business and no formal business plan, Hickman hit the road - literally. If he saw a car on the street that looked like it could use his skills, he'd approach the owner. "I would actually run up to people in the middle of the intersection to try to convince them that I was the guy to fix up their stereo. If the driver was young and looked like someone who took an interest in their car, I would go talk to them. Hickman recalls. Using his college connections, positive word-of-mouth, submissions of his work to national auto magazines, and meticulously building relationships with manufacturers, vendors and suppliers, Hickman grew his business from a drive-by sales pitch to an award winning company employing about eight installers. Although Hickman is currently focused on growing his business, he does envision getting married and raising children someday. At present, his custom automotive work provides a stimulating creative outlet for him. In addition, he is putting the finishing touches on a book of poetry and other writings. While Hickman definitely has his serious side, he also has a quirky sense of humor. In fact, he even got up the nerve to perform as a stand-up comic while attending college. "I don't have enough sense to be scared," he chuckles. Hickman believes success in business demands a suspension of fear and a commitment to give it your all. "You need to be fanatical about it," Hickman advises.


INK Cover Story :

inknewspaper.com [cached]

LOS Labs Automotive Firm's Carlos Hickman sets an example for young and old alike


Los Labs: About Us - News

www.loslabs.com [cached]

When Carlos Hickman was an electronic engineering technology student at Purdue University in the late'90s, he had to pick up some odd jobs in West Lafayette to keep his tuition and other bills paid.
While other local dealers do similar work, Hickman has positioned himself to specialize in high-end jobs. Click for Larger Image - Los Labs featured in Journal Gazette One project in progress is making over a BMW X5. The crew is installing a stereo system, satellite television, wireless Internet access and biometric ignition and security features that read fingerprints. The exterior of the vehicle is also being redesigned. The job, which will involve "well over" 1,000 man-hours, would cost a customer off the street about $200,000, Hickman said. The most Los Labs has charged a customer was "upwards of $50,000," Hickman said. Hickman, who has seven employees, said Los Labs' growth has been slow over the past seven years. "Up until here, it's been kind of hand-to-mouth," he said about the company's break-even 2005. "It's been mostly word-of-mouth growth," Hickman said. Hickman said it's similar to adding a spoiler to a trunk. Click for Larger Image - Los Labs featured in Journal Gazette "It's like that concept on steroids," he said. "You could take a standard car and make it look like something exotic." The business owner, who describes himself as thankful and happy to be doing what he's doing, is hands-on when there's work to be done. He'll clean toilets, take out trash, make molds, wire sound systems and spend 30 minutes talking to a 15-year-old who has a lot more ideas about stereos than he has money. Music lovers with fatter wallets can get hooked up by Hickman. But it's probably better if they don't ask him for a ride. He drives a'96 white Ford Ranger that lacks the upgrades he installs for others every day. "It's raggedy, and I love it. The CD player gets loud on its own sometimes," Hickman said. "It's the classic tradesman story - the barber with the wild hair. I'm the stereo guy with the crappy system."


INK – Black community news for and about African Americans in Indiana and the Midwest :

inknewspaper.com [cached]

LOS Labs Automotive Firm's Carlos Hickman sets an example for young and old alike [Read more of this story] Read More →


www.loslabs.com

When Carlos Hickman was an electronic engineering technology student at Purdue University in the late'90s, he had to pick up some odd jobs in West Lafayette to keep his tuition and other bills paid. While other local dealers do similar work, Hickman has positioned himself to specialize in high-end jobs. Click for Larger Image - Los Labs featured in Journal GazetteOne project in progress is making over a BMW X5.The crew is installing a stereo system, satellite television, wireless Internet access and biometric ignition and security features that read fingerprints.The exterior of the vehicle is also being redesigned.The job, which will involve "well over" 1,000 man-hours, would cost a customer off the street about $200,000, Hickman said. The most Los Labs has charged a customer was "upwards of $50,000," Hickman said. Hickman, who has seven employees, said Los Labs' growth has been slow over the past seven years. "Up until here, it's been kind of hand-to-mouth," he said about the company's break-even 2005."It's been mostly word-of-mouth growth," Hickman said.Hickman said it's similar to adding a spoiler to a trunk. Click for Larger Image - Los Labs featured in Journal Gazette"It's like that concept on steroids," he said."You could take a standard car and make it look like something exotic." The business owner, who describes himself as thankful and happy to be doing what he's doing, is hands-on when there's work to be done.He'll clean toilets, take out trash, make molds, wire sound systems and spend 30 minutes talking to a 15-year-old who has a lot more ideas about stereos than he has money. Music lovers with fatter wallets can get hooked up by Hickman.But it's probably better if they don't ask him for a ride.He drives a'96 white Ford Ranger that lacks the upgrades he installs for others every day. "It's raggedy, and I love it.The CD player gets loud on its own sometimes," Hickman said."It's the classic tradesman story - the barber with the wild hair.I'm the stereo guy with the crappy system."


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