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Cara Pace

President

Housing Solutions USA

HQ Phone:  (212) 373-4600

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Housing Solutions USA

316 W 95Th Street

New York City, New York,10025

United States

Background Information

Employment History

Vice President, Planning and Operations

Homes


Director of Housing

VOA


Project Management Consultant

Consulting Services Inc


Division Director

Volunteers


Division Director

Volunteers


Web References(8 Total References)


www.workingmomsagainstguilt.com

You are here: Home / Expert Advice / Leaning In to Help the Homeless: Q&A with Cara Pace
Leaning In to Help the Homeless: Q&A with Cara Pace Cara Pace and Family One of those "Leaners" is Cara Pace. Cara is a wife, mother and president of Housing Solutions USA, a nonprofit that provides safe, secure family emergency transitional shelters and housing along with supportive services in New York City. I wanted to learn more about what Cara does in her work and home life, and more importantly, how she achieves a fit that works for her and her family. Check out this recent Q&A to see what she had to say:


www.workingmomsagainstguilt.com

Cara Pace and Family
One of those "Leaners" is Cara Pace. Cara is a wife, mother and president of Housing Solutions USA, a nonprofit that provides safe, secure family emergency transitional shelters and housing along with supportive services in New York City. I wanted to learn more about what Cara does in her work and home life, and more importantly, how she achieves a fit that works for her and her family. Check out this recent Q&A to see what she had to say:


www.prweb.com

Stated Cara Pace, President and co-director with Mr. Hess of Housing Solutions USA: "Our programs are designed to treat the underlying causes of homelessness."
Prior to joining Housing Solutions USA, for the past decade, Ms. Pace was Division Director of the Housing Division of Volunteers of America-Greater New York, responsible for an annual budget of more than $41 million and 30 programs.


www.icphusa.org [cached]

"When you go up to the camps while in session and see the kids in action and how rewarding it is ... these kids really take a lot away from it," says Cara Pace, vice president for planning and operations at Homes for the Homeless.
The camps are only in session during the summer months, therefore every spring HFH seeks out volunteers to assist in an exhaustive cleanup of the debris that gathered during the winter months. "It is brutal, hard, hot work with bugs," says Pace. "It involves clearing out the leaves and picking up the 'winter' from the campsites. In her search for dedicated volunteers, Pace contacted the volunteer coordinator at West Point. At around the same time, the cadets were looking for an opportunity to help the community. "I was asking about opportunities in New York City and asking about different organizations that might be looking for help. Someone referred me to Cara," tells Cohen. Lindsay adds, "We asked Cara, 'What can we do? "They learned what a plebe is (a first year cadet) and what they go through-how they have to sit at the table, how they should not waste food, how to properly use their utensils, what is the appropriate tone of voice to use at the table," recalls Pace when discussing the experience. "A lot of the players actually came from similar situations as our kids-very poor backgrounds, formerly homeless, from Queens close to where the Saratoga is-and the kids really got to connect with them," says Pace. "We set up a board game tournament at the Saratoga so that they could tour what a shelter is like, experience our recreation program, and interact with the parents," explains Pace. "They treated us to lunch up at West Point, so the kids hosted them at a very nice luncheon afterwards." Players on West Point's football team bonded with the children from the Saratoga, and invited them to attend their Annual Black and Gold Spring Game where they took the time to sign autographs for the group. More than 40 children and some parents gathered in the recreation room at the Saratoga to play games like Connect 4, Stratego, Uno, Battleship, and life-sized Jenga with the cadets, who wore their Army White Uniform, one of the Army's dress uniforms. "That was super impressive to the kids," says Pace. "We satisfied the project needs for volunteering in the community and working as a mentor with underserved kids, but we also needed volunteers to clean up at camp," says Pace. "He provided a lecture to them on the history of homelessness in New York City, the challenges faced in the operation of shelters, and what it is like to make a difference with public policy around the subject of homelessness," explains Pace. "The cadets are excellent role models-they see things through," says Pace. That they could go on to higher education, that there are opportunities out there, that you can get a great education subsidized if you apply yourself and have really good grades and do community service," added Pace. "They could end up being a West Point cadet themselves. It helped them see their future is in their grasp-that they can cultivate where they want to go." In fact, many of them were encouraged by their interactions with the cadets. "The kids wanted to move in with the cadets-to be their roommates," recalls Pace. One young boy, Giovanni, was very clearly in his element around the cadets. Although the trip to West Point was organized for the older participants of the Saratoga recreation program, he was so persistent that they allowed him to attend. He ended up leading the hike alongside the cadets. "It definitely sparked something for him," suggests Pace. "They were very focused on making it a rewarding opportunity for our children and I commend them for their dedication to the project," says Pace.


www.shnny.org [cached]

Cara Pace
Housing Division Director, Volunteers of America Greater New York


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