Need more? Try out  Advanced Search (20+ criteria)»

logo

Last Update

This profile was last updated on 9/11/2014 and contains contributions from the  Zoominfo Community.

is this you? Claim your profile.

Wrong Candice King?

Candice King

Meteorologist

WTVO

HQ Phone:  (815) 963-5413

Direct Phone: (815) ***-****direct phone

GET ZOOMINFO GROW

+ Get 10 Free Contacts a Month

Please agree to the terms and conditions.

I agree to the  Terms of Service and  Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Grow at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

THANK YOU FOR DOWNLOADING!

computers
  • 1.Download
    ZoomInfo Grow
    v sign
  • 2.Run Installation
    Wizard
  • 3.Check your inbox to
    Sign in to ZoomInfo Grow

I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

WTVO

1917 North Meridian Raod

Rockford, Illinois,61101

United States

Background Information

Employment History

Weather Spotter


Affiliations

The NWIGCSA

Board Member


Education

Freeport High School


Highland Community College


Bachelor of Science Degree

Meteorology

Northern Illinois University


Web References(30 Total References)


wcrz.com

WTVO's Candice King, who is about eight months pregnant, responds to a viewer who suggests she should be "ashamed" of how she looks on TV.


www.agrinewspubs.com

"We do get supercell thunderstorms, but they're not very frequent because we get such high humidity," said Candice King, chief meteorologist at WTVO TV in Rockford.
"They are more prone to the Plains." However, on April 9, 2015, a supercell thunderstorm tore through northern Illinois. "What's really impressive is six tornadoes came from one supercell thunderstorm," said King during an educational session at the Northern Illinois Farm Show. The April tornado, which started near Franklin Grove, King said, was on the ground for more than 30 miles. "A lot of times with larger tornadoes, you get satellite tornadoes where you have a main tornado and little vortexes spin around it," she explained. "This tornado produced two satellite tornadoes." King showed a photo from a satellite of the path of the Illinois tornado. "It didn't just travel in a straight line," she said. Two Deaths In addition to lots of property damage, this tornado also resulted in two fatalities and 22 people were injured. "From a meteorologist standpoint, you never want to hear of injuries, let alone fatalities," King said. "But no matter what you do, when you have tornadoes of this strength, sometimes injuries are going to happen even when people take every precaution." Northern Illinois was in a prime spot for a tornado on that April day. "Everything that went up that afternoon spun," King recalled. "In my career of meteorology, I don't ever want to go through something like that again." Four days prior to the April storm, the storm prediction center highlighted northern Illinois as an area that might experience severe weather based on forecast models. "The reason these thunderstorms had spin was because there was a lot of wind shear," King explained. "One of the signatures we look for is if the supercell is trying to form a hook," she said. "Everything that spins doesn't produce a tornado. From 5 to 10 percent of supercell thunderstorms produce a tornado." On April 9, there was quite a temperature difference for Chicago, where it was about 70 degrees, to Milwaukee that only was in the upper 40s. "That's almost a 30-degree temperature difference from north of the front to the south of the front," King noted. "As the thunderstorms started to develop they crossed over the boundary of the warm front and were riding along it," she said. "And because there was spin already going on in the atmosphere that helped the thunderstorm to rotate." Since the tornado followed along the boundary, it was able to sustain its rotation. "At times this wedge tornado was estimated to be from one-half to one-mile wide," King reported. Although the tornado did occur during the peak tornado season in Illinois from April to June, she said, tornadoes can form during other times of the year. "If we get the right conditions, we may only need a temperature in the mid-60s and a dew point at 50 degrees to have a tornado during the off severe weather season," she said. King stressed the importance of being prepared during thunderstorms. "Don't let your guard down," she warned. "With meteorology, we're not going to be able to pinpoint specifically where a tornado is going to touch down or a thunderstorm is going to form," she said.


www.ideaggroup.com [cached]

Presenters: Candice King, Chief Meteorologist with WTVO
Candice King, Chief Meteorologist with WTVO TV in Rockford will discuss how severe weather has impacted Northern Illinois. Candice will focus on the Fairdale tornado that affected Lee, Ogle, DeKalb and Boone Counties in the spring of 2015.


wqad.com

I asked Candice King, Chief Meteorologist at WTVO-TV, whether there's enough education when it comes to severe weather.


www.agrinews-pubs.com [cached]

It is nothing new," said Candice King, chief meteorologist at WTVO-TV in Rockford.Â
Continue reading >


Similar Profiles

city

Browse ZoomInfo's Business
Contact Directory by City

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory