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This profile was last updated on 8/10/10  and contains information from public web pages.

Manager

Jacob Arner Memorial Airport
 
Background

Employment History

7 Total References
Web References
Byron Arner honored; program ...
www.tnonline.com, 10 Aug 2010 [cached]
Byron Arner honored; program celebrates '80 years of aviation in Lehighton'
...
A highlight of that celebration was a salute to Byron Arner, the former longtime manager of the Jacob Arner Memorial Airport who has been a pilot for six decades. Arner was the recipient of several awards and given heaps of praise in recognition of his lengthy record of safe flying.
Among those awards was the prestigious FAA Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award. It was presented by representatives of the FAA, who noted that Arner had flown a cumulative 52,000 hours.
Arner also had a career with the former Eastern Airlines.
...
Byron and several other speakers offered a history of aviation in Lehighton, which began in 1928 when an airport off South Ninth Street in Lehighton was constructed.
...
Byron noted that many pilots who soloed in small aircraft at the local airport went on to become employed by major airlines. At least two dozen of them were in attendance for Saturday's program.
Bill VanArtsdalen, pilot and program manager of the FAA Safety Team, presented Byron Arner with the special Master Pilot Award.
...
VanArtsdalen also handed him a "Blue Ribbon Package," which contained information about Arner from throughout his 60-year aviation career.
...
John Miller, chief of Forest Fire Protection Division of the Bureau, gave him a plaque and said Arner was "one of the most dependable vendors in the commonwealth to supply the aircraft and the pilots" for fighting forest fires.
...
Arner, who still gives flying lessons at the Jacob Arner Memorial Airport (Carbon County Airport) in Mahoning Township, introduced his daughter, Jacqueline McKelvay of Ocean City, Md., and his son Jake of Nesquehoning.
...
Byron was the captain and Jake was a flight engineer.
...
VanArtsdalen gave a rundown of Byron's flying career.
...
Byron told about the influence his father, the late Jacob Arner, had on his life and his career.
...
"My father trained a lot of boys who went overseas" for World War II," Byron noted.
...
Byron said he would hang out at the Lehighton Airport where he would wash planes and gas them as a child, eventually getting into piloting.
Byron Arner operates the flying ...
carboncountymagazine.com, 1 Jan 2005 [cached]
Byron Arner operates the flying school and charter service at the Jake Arner Memorial Airport in Lehighton.
...
Jake and his son, Byron, operated the airport for 25 years ending in 1998.
...
Jensen Aircraft (courtesy Byron Arner.
...
FairgroundsAirfield (courtesy Byron Arner) The Lehighton Fairgrounds (the current home of the Lehighton High School) attracted flyers to use the center of the horseracing track as a runway.
...
In 1973, Jake Arner and his son, Byron, entered into a 25-year agreement to operate the airport.
...
His son, Byron continued to operate the airport, renamed the Jake Arner Memorial Airport, until 1998. Carbon County currently operates the airport. Byron Arner operates the flight school and charter service at the airport.
Byron began flying with his dad at the age of six and soloed at sixteen. Besides operating the flight and charter school, he managed a career as a pilot for Eastern Airlines.
Arner Flying Service weathers downturn in industry - March 8, 2004
www.dailyitem.com, 8 Mar 2004 [cached]
LEHIGHTON (AP) - Byron Arner has a word for the feeling that hits him when he soars thousands of feet above the ground in one of the planes he's flown almost all his life.
"When the electricity flows from the controls into you, you've got to have more," he said.
Arner still feels the electricity in a cockpit, even after 30 years as an Eastern Airlines pilot and five decades teaching others how to fly.It's part of what keeps him involved in Arner Flying Service, the second-generation business he runs out of Jake Arner Memorial Airport in Mahoning Township.
Byron Arner's father, for whom the airport is named, started flying in Carbon County in 1928.He built the company his son continues, offering flying lessons, charter services and sightseeing flights.
The shock of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks still reverberates at the small roadside airstrip Arner Flying Service calls home.Insurance costs have skyrocketed, interest in flying has dropped, and Arner admits times are tough.
Arner believes business will get better.For now, it's mostly his own determination - and that electricity - that keeps Arner Flying Service in the air.
"This is a labor of love right now," he said.
...
Arner Airport "is a place that has a legacy behind it," said Dennis Sysak of Allentown, who flies out of the airport and has known Byron Arner for several years.
...
Byron Arner caught the flying bug early, getting his license at age 16.He flew in the Marine Corps from 1954 to 1959, then went to work for Eastern.One wall of his airport office displays pictures, mostly black-and-white, of each type of plane he flew for the now- defunct airline.
In his airline days, Arner commuted between Lehighton and the New York City area - by air, of course - so he could give flight lessons in his spare time.He estimates he's trained 500 licensed pilots, while the flying service claims more than 1,100 trainees.
Arner Flying Service today has about 30 students, about half of what it had in better times, Byron Arner said.In the 1970s and 1980s, he had up to 10 employees and seven planes.Now the flying service is Arner, his wife, Louise, two part-time trainers and three planes.
The 40 hours of flight training needed for a basic pilot's license costs about $4,000, Arner said.Early lessons with an instructor cost $120 an hour, while solo flying time goes for $80 an hour.
Charter service is another mainstay of Arner's business.He promotes it as a convenient way to travel, without having to deal with airline security or delays.Costs vary, but Arner said a planeload of people can travel more cheaply than they can on a commercial flight.
Arner also makes money with sightseeing flights, which start at $30 a person for a local cruise, and bidding on government flight contracts for mapping and fire detection.The U.S. Department of Agriculture has hired Arner planes for aerial mapping surveys across eastern Pennsylvania.
"It's like any business: You do what you've got to do," he said.
Someone has to fly all those flights, and it's usually Arner.When paperwork piles up in the office, his wife handles it, leaving him clear to take off.
An unpredictable, weather-driven schedule comes with the job.During the clear summer months, days off are rare.In the winter, he might go 10 days without being able to fly.Arner estimates he flies 800 hours a year, about what airline pilots fly.
Arner won't comment on sales.But asked to compare today's hard times with the past, the only comparison he could summon was the oil crisis of the 1970s.
"Everybody thought we couldn't get fuel," he said."We had to send form letters to everyone, saying we had fuel and there was no reason not to fly."
Other post-Sept. 11 difficulties included a short-lived dispute with the Carbon County Airport Authority, which took over daily management of the airport from Arner in 1998.
The authority voted not to renew Arner Flying Service's lease in October 2001, but reversed the decision after meeting with Arner.
...
But it's also clear Byron Arner still likes what he does, and isn't finished doing it.
"I do it because I enjoy it," he said.
Early Air Mail
www.jttoday.com, 1 Jan 2005 [cached]
Byron Arner operates the flying school and charter service at the Jake Arner Memorial Airport in Lehighton.
...
Jake and his son, Byron, operated the airport for 25 years ending in 1998.
...
Jensen Aircraft (courtesy Byron Arner.
...
FairgroundsAirfield (courtesy Byron Arner) The Lehighton Fairgrounds (the current home of the Lehighton High School) attracted flyers to use the center of the horseracing track as a runway.
...
In 1973, Jake Arner and his son, Byron, entered into a 25-year agreement to operate the airport.
...
His son, Byron continued to operate the airport, renamed the Jake Arner Memorial Airport, until 1998.Carbon County currently operates the airport.Byron Arner operates the flight school and charter service at the airport.
Byron began flying with his dad at the age of six and soloed at sixteen.Besides operating the flight and charter school, he managed a career as a pilot for Eastern Airlines.
NEPA News
www.nepanews.com, 1 Mar 2004 [cached]
Byron Arner has a word for the feeling that hits him when he soars thousands of feet above the ground in one of the planes he's flown almost all his life.
"When the electricity flows from the controls into you, you've got to have more," he said.
Arner still feels the electricity in a cockpit, even after 30 years as an Eastern Airlines pilot and five decades teaching others how to fly.It's part of what keeps him involved in Arner Flying Service, the second-generation business he runs out of Jake Arner Memorial Airport in Mahoning Township.
Byron Arner's father, for whom the airport is named, started flying in Carbon County in 1928.He built the company his son continues, offering flying lessons, charter services and sightseeing flights.
The shock of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks still reverberates at the small roadside airstrip Arner Flying Service calls home.Insurance costs have skyrocketed, interest in flying has dropped, and Arner admits times are tough.
Arner believes business will get better.For now, it's mostly his own determination _ and that electricity _ that keeps Arner Flying Service in the air.
"This is a labor of love right now," he said.
...
Arner Airport "is a place that has a legacy behind it," said Dennis Sysak of Allentown, who flies out of the airport and has known Byron Arner for several years.
...
Byron Arner caught the flying bug early, getting his license at age 16.He flew in the Marine Corps from 1954 to 1959, then went to work for Eastern.One wall of his airport office displays pictures, mostly black-and-white, of each type of plane he flew for the now-defunct airline.
In his airline days, Arner commuted between Lehighton and the New York City area _ by air, of course _ so he could give flight lessons in his spare time.He estimates he's trained 500 licensed pilots, while the flying service claims more than 1,100 trainees.
Arner Flying Service today has about 30 students, about half of what it had in better times, Byron Arner said.In the 1970s and 1980s, he had up to 10 employees and seven planes.Now the flying service is Arner, his wife, Louise, two part-time trainers and three planes.
The 40 hours of flight training needed for a basic pilot's license costs about $4,000, Arner said.Early lessons with an instructor cost $120 an hour, while solo flying time goes for $80 an hour.
Charter service is another mainstay of Arner's business.He promotes it as a convenient way to travel, without having to deal with airline security or delays.Costs vary, but Arner said a planeload of people can travel more cheaply than they can on a commercial flight.
Arner also makes money with sightseeing flights, which start at $30 a person for a local cruise, and bidding on government flight contracts for mapping and fire detection.The U.S. Department of Agriculture has hired Arner planes for aerial mapping surveys across eastern Pennsylvania.
"It's like any business: You do what you've got to do," he said.
Someone has to fly all those flights, and it's usually Arner.When paperwork piles up in the office, his wife handles it, leaving him clear to take off.
An unpredictable, weather-driven schedule comes with the job.During the clear summer months, days off are rare.In the winter, he might go 10 days without being able to fly.Arner estimates he flies 800 hours a year, about what airline pilots fly.
Arner won't comment on sales.But asked to compare today's hard times with the past, the only comparison he could summon was the oil crisis of the 1970s.
"Everybody thought we couldn't get fuel," he said."We had to send form letters to everyone, saying we had fuel and there was no reason not to fly."
Other post-Sept. 11 difficulties included a short-lived dispute with the Carbon County Airport Authority, which took over daily management of the airport from Arner in 1998.
The authority voted not to renew Arner Flying Service's lease in October 2001, but reversed the decision after meeting with Arner.
...
But it's also clear Byron Arner still likes what he does, and isn't finished doing it.
"I do it because I enjoy it," he said.
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