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This profile was last updated on 9/11/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Bryan J. Pfister PhD

Wrong Bryan J. Pfister PhD?

Collaborators and Visiting Scient...

Phone: (973) ***-****  HQ Phone
Center for Applied Genomics
225 Warren Street
Newark, New Jersey 07103
United States

Company Description: The Center for Applied Genomics (CAG) at the Institute of Genomic Medicine (IGM) and the Public Health Research Institute (PHRI) is a leading academic medical...   more
Background

Employment History

7 Total References
Web References
CAG - Center for Applied Genomics
www.icph.org, 11 Sept 2014 [cached]
Bryan Pfister, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, NJIT
...
Bryan Pfister
Although a significant body of scientific ...
brain.jomariworks.com, 5 Jan 2012 [cached]
Although a significant body of scientific research has long contended that the physics behind gravitational force isn’t enough to cause problems, misconceptions have abounded anyway, said Bryan Pfister, PhD, an assistant professor in the department of biomedical engineering at NJIT. (Read more)
BrainLine.org Headlines
www.brainline.org [cached]
Although a significant body of scientific research has long contended that the physics behind gravitational force isn't enough to cause problems, misconceptions have abounded anyway, said Bryan Pfister, PhD, an assistant professor in the department of biomedical engineering at NJIT.
This article discusses a new study ...
www.gjtbs.com, 23 July 2010 [cached]
This article discusses a new study recently completed by Bryan Pfister, PhD, a specialist in neural tissue engineering and bio-dynamics. The study supports the findings by Exponent, the BIA, and Neuro-Med.
Low Risk of Traumatic Brain Injury from Roller Coaster Rides, Researcher Says June 28, 2010
With July 4th around the bend, if you've ever feared a head injury from a roller coaster ride, it's time to stop worrying and enjoy your local amusement parks. Although a significant body of scientific research has long contended that the physics behind gravitational force isn't enough to cause problems, misconceptions have abounded anyway, said Bryan Pfister, PhD, an assistant professor in the department of biomedical engineering at NJIT.
Pfister recently set out to disprove such misconceptions in his paper "Head Motions While Riding Roller Coasters: Implications for Brain Injury," (The American Journal of Forensic Medicine and Pathology, Dec. 2009). The paper makes the case that "there appears to be an extremely low risk of traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to the head motions induced by roller coaster rides."
"The risk of TBI while riding roller coasters has received substantial attention. Case reports of TBI around the time of riding roller coasters have led many medical professionals to assert that the high gravitational forces (G-forces) induced by roller coasters pose a significant TBI risk.
Head injury research, however, has shown that G-forces alone cannot predict TBI," said Pfister.
...
Pfister used established head injury criterions and procedures to compare the potential of TBI between daily activities and roller coaster riding.
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Pfister, a specialist in neural tissue engineering, received in 2007 a prestigious Faculty Early Career Development Award from the National Science Foundation to support and expand his research into rapid axon stretch growth, a technique for regenerating damaged or diseased nerve cells. He received his doctorate from Johns Hopkins University.
T.I.E.T.
www.internationaleyetrust.org, 15 July 2009 [cached]
Bryan J. Pfister, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology. Dr. Pfister is a specialist in neural tissue engineering. In 2007,Dr. Pfister received a prestigious Faculty Early Career Development Award from the National Science Foundation to support and expand his research into rapid axon stretch growth, a technique for regenerating damaged or diseased nerve cells. In collaboration with a team of physicians at the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Pfister has recreated in the laboratory a natural form of axon growth that occurs through stretching as an individual grows from embryo through early adulthood. By studying the tissue grown through the stretching technique, he hopes to find clues to repairing traumatic injuries to the spinal cord and other nerve tissue. Pfister also hopes to develop a nerve-tissue interface that would allow for a thought-controlled prosthesis that would behave like a natural limb.
Dr. Pfister received his PhD in materials science engineering and his MS degree in mechanical engineering, both from Johns Hopkins University, and his BS degree in interdisciplinary engineering and management from Clarkson University.
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