Need more? Try out  Advanced Search (20+ criteria)»

logo

Last Update

This profile was last updated on 4/5/2011 and contains contributions from the  Zoominfo Community.

is this you? Claim your profile.

Wrong Bruno Bernard?

Bruno A. Bernard

Head

Hair Biology Group

GET ZOOMINFO GROW

+ Get 10 Free Contacts a Month

Please agree to the terms and conditions.

I agree to the  Terms of Service and  Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Grow at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

THANK YOU FOR DOWNLOADING!

computers
  • 1.Download
    ZoomInfo Grow
    v sign
  • 2.Run Installation
    Wizard
  • 3.Check your inbox to
    Sign in to ZoomInfo Grow

I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Background Information

Employment History

Head of Hair Biology Research

Clichy


Affiliations

European Hair Research Society

Member


Society for Investigative Dermatology

Member


L'Oreal SA

Fellow


Education

PhD


PhD

UPMC Paris


Web References(90 Total References)


www.londonethnicskin.com

Bruno A. Bernard, PhD
Head of Hair-care, Qaulity and Colour


www.londonethnicskin.com

Bruno A. Bernard, PhD
Head of Hair-Care, Quality and Colour Life Sciences Research


www.ethnichairandskinsymposium.com [cached]

Bruno A. Bernard, PhDHead of the Hair Biology Group


www.bioscienceworld.ca [cached]

Until now, people have thought that the hair-whitening process is the consequence of a decline in melanogenesis - the synthesis of melanin - or a block in the transfer of melanin to the growing hair fibre, explains Bruno Bernard, PhD, an investigator with the Hair Biology Group. "It turns out that this is not the case," Bernard says."The main problem of the whitening process is a progressive decline in the absolute number of melanocytes." He explains that the number of melanocytes (pigment-producing cells in the skin, hair and eye) decreases over time in the hair follicle.Specifically, their quantity declines in both the outer root sheath - a reservoir region where quiescent melanocytes reside - and in the hair follicle bulb, the pigmentation unit where melanin is actively produced. During the hair-growth cycle, the pigmentation unit also undergoes a renewal, Bernard continues, relying upon the reservoir melanocytes. "The fact that this is a progressive process is very important because you can clearly hope to block it," Bernard says."To block the whitening process at one step - and since we know that the pigmentation process is renewed from the reservoir - as long as you have melanocytes in the reservoir, you can hope to reverse the whitening process. "People generally are desperate because they say, well, it's an ongoing process, we'll never stop it and we'll become totally white," Bernard says."So, really, you have to change your mind when you talk about the whitening process because it's not irreversible; it's something which is progressive, and as such, you can block it or even reverse it . . . So clearly that's another way to look at the problem." The findings also shed new light on how grey hair is perceived. "Up to now, people thought that there was no grey hair," Bernard says."Turns out that there are grey hairs and there are white hairs which still have some melanin in the fibre.But the amount of this melanin is too small for the fibre to be perceived pigmented.It is perceived white even though there are still melanocytes active in the pigmentation unit and generally, when you have active melanocytes in the pigmentation unit, you still have quiescent melanocytes in the reservoir." Bernard and his team have also uncovered details on the enzymatic mechanism of melanogenesis. He says that theoretical explanations of melanogenesis involve three main enzymes, tyrosinase, TRP-1 and TRP-2.His team has discovered that TRP-2 is not expressed in the human hair follicle, even though hair pigmentation can result, and that the enzyme is still active in all skin melanocytes.


www.loreal.com [cached]

Bruno Bernard, L'Oréal Fellow


Similar Profiles

city

Browse ZoomInfo's Business
Contact Directory by City

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory