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Wrong Bruce Dowbiggin?

Bruce Dowbiggin

Columnist

Calgary Herald

HQ Phone:  (403) 235-7100

Email: b***@***.com

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Calgary Herald

Station M 215 16 St. S.E.

Calgary, Alberta,T2P 0W8

Canada

Company Description

The Calgary Herald Mining and Ranche Advocate and General Advertiser began publishing as a weekly newspaper on August 31, 1883 when Calgary's population was just 400 people. Since then, the Calgary Herald has chronicled the evolution of this vibrant, enterpris... more.

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Web References(141 Total References)


Administration | The Prince Arthur Herald

princearthurherald.com [cached]

Bruce Dowbiggin
Bruce Dowbiggin's career is unmatched in Canada for its diversity and breadth of experience, with successful stints in television, radio, and print. A two-time winner... Bruce Dowbiggin


.:The FAN 960 - Calgary's Sports Radio

www.fan960.com [cached]

Bruce DowbigginBruce is an author and a columnist for the Calgary Herald.Bruce is on the Fan 2-5pm weekdays for the Big Show.Email Bruce Dowbiggin at bruce.dowbiggin@rci.rogers.com


princearthurherald.com

Bruce Dowbiggin's career is unmatched in Canada for its diversity and breadth of experience, with successful stints in television, radio, and print.
A two-time winner of the Gemini Award as Canada's top television sports broadcaster, he is also the best-selling author of seven books. He was a featured columnist for the Calgary Herald (1998-2009) and the Globe & Mail (2009-2013). Follow him on Twitter @dowbboy.


princearthurherald.com

Bruce Dowbiggin: Today’s Paul Martin bears no resemblance to the ’90s’ debt warrior
Bruce Dowbiggin's career is unmatched in Canada for its diversity and breadth of experience, with successful stints in television, radio, and print. A two-time winner of the Gemini Award as Canada's top television sports broadcaster, he is also the best-selling author of seven books. He was a featured columnist for the Calgary Herald (1998-2009) and the Globe & Mail (2009-2013). Follow him on Twitter @dowbboy.


Bruce Dowbiggin

www.thestickonline.com [cached]

The idea becomes more palatable when one reads Canadian sportswriter Bruce Dowbiggin's outstanding new book The Stick: A history, a celebration, an elegy.
Dowbiggin visited Stephen Murphy, whose doctoral thesis at the University of Waterloo was called "Three-Dimensional Dynamic Analysis of the Ice Hockey Stick During the Stationary Slap Shot." "He's bent at the waist, transferring his weight from the back leg to the front leg," Murphy told Dowbiggin, a street hockey player himself, and more than a decent golfer too, "which allows him to generate energy, to deform the stick because he's loading it up while it's on the ice." Bruce Dowbiggin Macfarlane Walter & Ross, I was recalled to those days as I read Bruce Dowbiggin's wonderful The Stick: A History, A Celebration, An Elegy , which includes the story of former Tampa Bay Lightning general manager Phil Esposito taking one of his player's sticks into his office and imploring it to help the guy score more. A columnist for the Calgary Herald and the author most recently of Of Ice and Men (1998), Dowbiggin is one of hockey's most perceptive witnesses. I know what you're thinking: 250 pages on the humble hockey stick? Ah, but as anyone who's wielded a Sher-Wood or a Koho or an Easton knows, it contains multitudes, and Dowbiggin plumbs them all. From the one-piece hornbeam sticks handcarved by Mikmaq craftsmen in Nova Scotia through to the "radio frequency gluing" used in the construction of today's ultralight Hespeler sticks, Dowbiggin takes us on a fascinating tour of the evolution of stick engineering. He tracks the history of the industry, talks to Stan Mikita about the advent of the curved blade, parleys with Brendan Shanahan of the Detroit Red Wings about lie and whip and blade patterns. He quotes Auden and Frost and Purdy and Robert Graves. He writes of Percy Lesueur, a goaltender for the old-time Ottawa Senators, who used to carve messages in Latin into his stick, and of former Edmonton Oiler and Detroit Red Wing winger Petr Klima, who was convinced that each of his sticks held only a single goal, which meant he had to break his stick every time he scored and go for a new one. Always insightful, always entertaining, Dowbiggin also finds room to look, unblinkingly, at the ugly reality (and ongoing hypocrisy) of hockey violence. Calgary herald sportswriter Bruce Dowbiggin's last foray into hockey books was "Of Ice and Me", a look at how a handful of hockey greats had mastered their craft. But they say that craftspeople are only as good as their tools, so in his latest work, Dowbiggin looks at the implements crucial to the game-- the hockey stick. The switch has the potential to create the biggest boon to scoring since Stan Mikita popularized the curved stick in the Sixties, says Bruce Dowbiggin, author of his latest book, The Stick. "We've had shot speeds of up to 100 to 105 miles an hour," says Dowbiggin. "It becomes a journey," Dowbiggin said of his research. "The way I put the book together shows you the importance of the hockey stick," says Dowbiggin. "In this country, whether you're in Victoria or St. John's, you talk hockey and hockey sticks and you're using a common language." Stick anecdotes abound -- too many to get into one book. "I was doing some work around the house and I hacked my arm open and had to go get stitches," says Dowbiggin. Dowbiggin's The Stick is a fan's notes. Dowbiggin dutifully takes us through the history of the hockey stick, talking about the equipment's development from wood through to the more high-tech materials such as graphite composite. He introduces us to the small businessman who started up stick plants and how larger and larger global concerns steadily swallowed up the competition. But you sense it's when Dowbiggin talks about the players and their use of the stick that his interest takes hold, reasonable given his background as a sports writer. He spends his time investigating who innovated the first curved blade and its affect on play. He looks at how the type and brand of stick impacted the players' performance. And in the chapter aptly called Laying on the Lumber, Dowbiggin chronicles the use of the stick as a weapon in games. Some of the more quirky stuff is of interest as well. Dowbiggin interviewed hockey artists and stick collectors. Dowbiggin often relies on large blocks of quote and occasionally tries to pass off a sentence without any accompanying analysis. For instance, he writes, "Graphite, or plumbago, is a hexagonally crystallized allotropic form of carbon. Dowbiggin himself effectively destroys that line of argument by showing how globalized the industry has become, much like hockey itself.


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