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2016-08-28T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Brian Wolslegel?

Mr. Brian Wolslegel

Owner

Custom Robotic Wildlife

Direct Phone: (715) ***-****       

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Custom Robotic Wildlife

Background Information

Web References (43 Total References)


Taxidermist makes robotic decoys used to help nab poachers across the US | Lexington Herald-Leader

www.kentucky.com [cached]

Brian Wolslegel, owner of Custom Robotic Wildlife, is pictured with some of his creations. Brian Wolslegel, owner of Custom Robotic Wildlife, is pictured with some of his creations. Custom Robotic Wildlife TNS

...
Brian Wolslegel was fresh out of school and looking for work as a firefighter when he took a temporary job with a taxidermist. One day a game warden walked into the shop near Wausau, Wis., and asked if he could build a robotic deer to help catch an illegal hunter.
"I had putzed around with robotic cars just like any kid," Wolslegel said, "and we started messing around with little motors to make things move. It was a lot of fun."
More than 20 years later, he's still at it. His business, Custom Robotic Wildlife, is now one of the oldest and best regarded of its kind in North America. Each year, Wolslegel builds a menagerie of about 150 lifelike remote-controlled animals, mostly for wildlife enforcement officers in states and American Indian reservations across the United States and Canada.
Compared to current motorized decoys, that first attempt was "prehistoric," Wolslegel recalled, laughing.
...
"Whatever people ask for, we'll definitely try," Wolslegel said.
Wolslegel has named his latest mechanical deer "The Deuce."
"He lifts his tail and poops," Wolslegel said. He's already sold one and is working on another, much to the delight of his children.
...
The biggest challenge, particularly with deer, is hiding the cuts around the neck and legs, Wolslegel said.
...
Wolslegel is constantly working on new techniques to get the decoys to move differently, often based on feedback from officers in the field.
Lately he's been experimenting with carbon dioxide cartridges to make it look like the animal is blowing air.
Wolslegel does not hunt. He and his family raise about 45 whitetail deer on property in central Wisconsin, which he mostly keeps as pets and to educate the public.
He bristles over criticisms that officers use his realistic animals as a form of entrapment. True hunting, he said, is "meeting that animal on its own terms. Poaching robs individual hunters, businesses and taxpayers that rely on the sport and the region's gene pool.
"Most officers know who they're after," he said.


Brian Wolslegel with two of ...

www.adn.com [cached]

Brian Wolslegel with two of his creations; demand for wildlife robots is huge, says Jim Reed of the Humane Society Wildlife Land Trust, which donates them to anti-poaching agencies.

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The decoys look so alive because, well, they once were, said Brian Wolslegel, owner of the Wisconsin-based Custom Robotic Wildlife. Wolslegel - who does not hunt but instead raises deer in his backyard - makes the dummies out of hides acquired legally from hunters, game wardens or online. (You, too, can purchase a bear hide at taxidermy.net.)
Each year he sells as many as 100 whitetail deer, by far his most popular item. Officers, he said, tell him they make as much as $30,000 in fines off each fake animal.
"To have a poacher, a wild animal and a law enforcement officer at the same scene, it's like winning the lottery," he said. And then if the poacher is caught, "the animal already died in the process."
Robo-wildlife, it turns out, are pretty hard to kill. If a bullet busts the motor, it's replaceable, Wolslegel said.


Brian Wolslegel poses with two ...

www.dailycomet.com [cached]

Brian Wolslegel poses with two of his creations.

...
The decoys look so alive because, well, they once were, said Brian Wolslegel, owner of the Wisconsin-based Custom Robotic Wildlife. Wolslegel - who does not hunt but instead raises deer in his backyard - makes the dummies out of hides acquired legally from hunters, game wardens or online. (You, too, can purchase a bear hide at taxidermy.net.)
Each year he sells as many as 100 whitetail deer, by far his most popular item. Officers, he said, tell him they make as much as $30,000 in fines off each fake animal.
"To have a poacher, a wild animal and a law enforcement officer at the same scene, it's like winning the lottery," he said. And then if the poacher is caught, "the animal already died in the process."
Robo-wildlife, it turns out, are pretty hard to kill. If a bullet busts the motor, it's replaceable, Wolslegel said.


Brian Wolslegel poses with two ...

www.houmatoday.com [cached]

Brian Wolslegel poses with two of his creations.

...
The decoys look so alive because, well, they once were, said Brian Wolslegel, owner of the Wisconsin-based Custom Robotic Wildlife. Wolslegel - who does not hunt but instead raises deer in his backyard - makes the dummies out of hides acquired legally from hunters, game wardens or online. (You, too, can purchase a bear hide at taxidermy.net.)
Each year he sells as many as 100 whitetail deer, by far his most popular item. Officers, he said, tell him they make as much as $30,000 in fines off each fake animal.
"To have a poacher, a wild animal and a law enforcement officer at the same scene, it's like winning the lottery," he said. And then if the poacher is caught, "the animal already died in the process."
Robo-wildlife, it turns out, are pretty hard to kill. If a bullet busts the motor, it's replaceable, Wolslegel said.


Brian Wolslegel poses with two ...

www.houmatoday.com [cached]

Brian Wolslegel poses with two of his creations.

...
The decoys look so alive because, well, they once were, said Brian Wolslegel, owner of the Wisconsin-based Custom Robotic Wildlife. Wolslegel - who does not hunt but instead raises deer in his backyard - makes the dummies out of hides acquired legally from hunters, game wardens or online. (You, too, can purchase a bear hide at taxidermy.net.)
Each year he sells as many as 100 whitetail deer, by far his most popular item. Officers, he said, tell him they make as much as $30,000 in fines off each fake animal.
"To have a poacher, a wild animal and a law enforcement officer at the same scene, it's like winning the lottery," he said. And then if the poacher is caught, "the animal already died in the process."
Robo-wildlife, it turns out, are pretty hard to kill. If a bullet busts the motor, it's replaceable, Wolslegel said.

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