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Wrong Brian Wolfer?

Brian Wolfer

District Biologist

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

HQ Phone:  (503) 947-6000

Email: b***@***.us

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

4034 Fairview Industrial Drive Se

Salem, Oregon,97302

United States

Web References(71 Total References)


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www.eraptors.org [cached]

Brian Wolfer District Biologist, Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


www.kezi.com

So, there hasn't been any big impacts yet but we are seeing little differences in where the animals are choosing to spend the winter," said Brian Wolfer, a district wildlife biologist with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.
So, there hasn't been any big impacts yet but we are seeing little differences in where the animals are choosing to spend the winter," said Brian Wolfer, a district wildlife biologist with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.


bigcatrescue.org

According to Brian Wolfer, a biologist for the Oregon Department of Fish Wildlife, there are an estimated 5,700 cougars in Oregon.


www.kval.com

@Ritual99Â "If a person encounters a cougar, the best thing to do is make yourself look big and make sure it knows you see it," said Brian Wolfer, district wildlife biologist for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.


www.katu.com

The homeowner called her dog, and the cougar left the house, said Brian Wolfer with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.
The homeowner wasn't too concerned about the late October incident and planned to lock the pet door when not in use, Wolfer said. However, Wolfer called it "kind of concerning" that a cougar would enter a home that way. He advised homeowners to lock doors and keep pet food secure, even inside the house. The ODFW agent's name is Wolfer? That's great! It's the little things, people.


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