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This profile was last updated on 10/30/13  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Executive Director

Local Address: California, United States
Company Description: The Bird Group is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization created to conduct avian research and conservation activities, primarily concerning birds of prey. Click on...   more
Background

Employment History

  • Senior Raptor Biologist
    URS Corporation
  • Senior Raptor Biologist
    BioResource Consultants, Inc.
  • Lead Field Biologist
    UC Santa Cruz
  • Member, Predatory Bird Research Group
    UC Santa Cruz
  • Lead Field Biologist
    Predatory Bird Research Group
  • Raptor Biologist
    NOREAS Inc
  • Project Manager for the Channel Islands Golden Eagle Removal Program
    Santa Cruz Predatory Bird Research Group
  • Falcon Biologist
    Santa Cruz Predatory Bird Research Group
  • Principle Investigator for the California Energy Commision-Public Interest Energy Research, Avian-Energy Systems Mitigation Program
    Santa Cruz Predatory Bird Research Group

Board Memberships and Affiliations

Education

  • B.S. , Natural Resources Conservation
    University of Maryland , College Park
61 Total References
Web References
| THE BIRD GROUP | Avian Research + Conservation |
birdgroup.org, 30 Oct 2013 [cached]
Brian C. Latta, Executive Director831.234.5079 blatta@birdgroup.org Brian Latta is currently the Executive Director of the newly incorporated non-profit The Bird Group. Brian has worked on various conservation and research projects involving raptors as lead field biologist and raptor propagation and release specialist for the UC Santa Cruz Predatory Bird Research Group (SCPBRG) from 1989 through 2008. From June 2007 to July 2008 he was SCPBRG's Principle Investigator on the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area Avian Fatality Studies, supervising the avian mortality monitoring team and participating in study design in a cooperative program to reduce avian and bat mortality caused by wind turbines in Alameda County. Brian was also SCPBRG's Principle Investigator for the California Energy Commision-Public Interest Energy Research, Avian-Energy Systems Mitigation Program during the latter half of 2007. From 1999 to 2004 he was SCPBRG's project manager for the Channel Islands Golden Eagle Removal Program and continues to serve as Golden Eagle expert on the Island Fox Integrated Recovery Team. As a field biologist he participated in various studies involving raptors and wind energy including Grainger Hunt's golden eagle mortality study as well as pre- and post-installation wind farm raptor surveys for Biosystems, Inc., BioResource Consultants, and Peter H. Bloom. He has also worked on various raptor field projects in Alaska, Texas, Arizona, Oregon, North Carolina, Mexico, Spain, Siberia, and Fiji. Brian received a B.S. in Natural Resources Conservation from the University of Maryland, College Park in 1986.
...
We learned that when Brian Latta was flying her for rehabilitation exercise and she flew in to the nest canyon. We were concerned she might be attacked by "the locals" but it turned out she WAS the local, as evidenced by the male mating with her. Brian decided at that point she was better off with her mate since it was the breeding season and he would feed her. They brought off three young the next season. She has been photographed devouring a pigeon on the beach in Santa Cruz wearing what are called aylmeris through which jesses would normally be threaded if the bird wasn't flying. Brian could have trapped her to remove them, but chose to let her be as they don't hurt anything and will eventually fall off, in fact they have already. A clue that this is indeed Angelina is that she has no band; if she were a lost falconry bird she would have been banded. Also, in the photos one can see she is hanging the "hand" of her right wing. She does this when relaxed but it doesn't affect her flying. She lost a ligament to the injury. In the picture, on a Santa Cruz beach, she's several miles from "home", nothing to a peregrine if there are abundant pigeons to be had.
Angelina during rehab. Photo: Brian Latta
Angelina
Angelina incubating after release. Photo: Brian Latta
| THE BIRD GROUP + Conservation |
birdgroup.org, 30 Oct 2013 [cached]
President - Brian C. Latta
Natural Reserve System
ucop.ucnrs.org, 24 Sept 2011 [cached]
"We passed the time doing data entry," Roemer continues, "reading books from the library, and helping Brian [Guerrero, the reserve steward]."
...
"I knew it would get harder," says Brian Latta of the Predatory Bird Research Group at UC Santa Cruz, "but I didn't know it would get this hard.
Mountain Light Photography: Galen's Articles
www.mountainlight.com, 1 April 1997 [cached]
Rappelling below me on a separate rope was Brian Latta, a falcon biologist for the Santa Cruz Predatory Bird Research Group. Here on a wild section of the Big Sur coast, we had found four perfect eggs a few weeks earlier. Adult peregrines had repeatedly dived on us, avoiding contact at the last possible moment with a rush of air that swept across our faces. Now the cliff was so quiet that I didn't trust my perceptions of being in the same place. A wave of sadness overcame me as I reached the bookshelf-width ledge.
"It seems so different when it's lifeless," I said to Latta. "Is this really the spot?"
Latta held out sticky fragments like the dregs of a popcorn bowl and replied, "These are definitely fresh."
...
Shortly after my 1995 rappel into the failed Big Sur nest, I joined Brian Latta in Sunol Regional Wilderness east of San Francisco Bay to trap a breeding peregrine and take a blood sample. He borrowed my cell phone to call in the bird's band number and found it matched a captive-bred chick I had photographed in 1990 on Mount Diablo, 30 miles to the north, as it was being "cross-fostered" into a prairie falcon nest.
Thrilled to have another chance to honestly symbolize my cautious optimism about the species' future, I asked Latta to hold the bird up for a portrait with his hand as low as possible, so as not to show. As I shot several frames of the fiercely proud bird with a motordriven Nikon F4, Latta said he didn't want to hold it any lower because it might . . .
At that instant, the bird dug its talons into Latta's hand and broke free while I held down my finger to capture an unplanned symbol of the hand of Man behind the agony of a species. The bird dropped onto a short tether, unharmed. Latta wiped his bloodied hand, held the bird up again to release it back into the wild, and relaxed his grip.
| THE BIRD GROUP + Conservation |
birdgroup.org, 30 Oct 2013 [cached]
Sincerely, Brian C. Latta, Executive DirectorThe Bird Group 831.234.5079 or blatta@birdgroup.org
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