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Wrong Brian Gold?

Brian T. Gold

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Background Information

Employment History

National Science Foundation


Associate Professor

University of Kentucky


Postdoctoral Scholar

Washington University in St. Louis


Web References(42 Total References)


Alzheimer's Imaging Study - Images - redOrbit

www.redorbit.com [cached]

This research was supported in part by a grant, awarded to Brian Gold of the University of Kentucky (UK) College of Medicine, from the National Science Foundation (BCS 08-14302) that was related to understanding how white matter integrity changes may precede cognitive declines in aging.
To learn more, see the UK news release the Alzheimer's Imaging Study Identifies Brain Changes. (Date of Image: June 2010) Credit: Brian T. Gold, Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Kentucky


www.freep.com

But in those studies, bilingual people were largely immigrants, raising questions about whether they differed in other ways from the general population, says Brian Gold, a neuroscientist at the University of Kentucky, Lexington.
The new study is more convincing, he says, "because it is studying bilingual people raised in the same country and culture."


www.durangoherald.com

But in those studies, bilingual people were largely immigrants, raising questions about whether they differed in other ways from the general population, says Brian Gold, a neuroscientist at the University of Kentucky, Lexington.
The new study is more convincing, he says, because it is studying bilingual people raised in the same country and culture.


v100pcb.com

Researchers tested how long it took participants to switch from one cognitive task to another, something that's known to take longer for older adults, said lead researcher Brian Gold, a neuroscientist at the [...]
"> iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) - Speaking two languages can actually help offset some effects of aging on the brain, a new study has found. Researchers tested how long it took participants to switch from one cognitive task to another, something that's known to take longer for older adults, said lead researcher Brian Gold, a neuroscientist at the University of Kentucky. "It has big implications these days because our population is aging more and more," Gold said. "Seniors are living longer, and that's a good thing, but it's only a good thing to the extent that their brains are healthy." Gold's team compared task-switching speeds for younger and older adults, knowing they would find slower speeds in the older population because of previous studies. However, they found that older adults who spoke two languages were able to switch mental gears faster than those who didn't. But don't go out and buy Rosetta Stone just yet. The study only looked at life-long bilinguals, defined in the study as people who had spoken a second language daily since they were at least 10 years old. First, Gold and his team asked 30 people, who were either bilingual or monolingual, to look at a series of colored shapes and respond with the name of each shape by pushing a button. Gold and his team found that bilingual people were not only able to switch tasks faster - they had different brain activity than their monolingual peers. Gold said he grew up in Montreal, where he spoke French at school and English at home, prompting relatives to question whether his French language immersion would somehow hinder his ability to learn English. "Until very recently, learning a second language in childhood was thought of as dangerous," he said.


www.wibw.com

The study was led by Brian Gold of the University of Kentucky in Lexington.


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