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Wrong Brian Beveridge?

Brian A. Beveridge

Partner

Paradigm Three Communications

HQ Phone:  (415) 786-3896

Email: b***@***.com

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Paradigm Three Communications

1521 5Th St.

Oakland, California,94607

United States

Background Information

Employment History

Executive Director

Oakland Environmental Health Indicators Project


Director, West Oakland Environmental Indicators Project

East Bay Green Corridor


Affiliations

WEST OAKLAND ENVIRONMENTAL INDICATORS PROJECT

Co-Director


West..

Co-Founder


Web References(44 Total References)


Company

paradigmthree.com [cached]

The two-time Ace Award winning team of Linda Pulver and Brian Beveridge has worked together since 1984.
Beveridge and Pulver each have more than 20 years of television and marketing experience, including cable and broadcast television, and corporate communications. Since founding their company in 1987, Beveridge and Pulver have developed information and marketing programs for clients as diverse as Shell Oil Co., Gloria Ferrer Champagne, Freixenet Champagne, and Oxford University, as well as, broadcast programs for KGO-TV (ABC), KRON-TV (NBC) and HBO. Linda relocated to SF during the 1980's and, after a stint in commercial production, started "Paradigm Three"with her partner Brian Beveridge, to continue her career in the production industry. Brian Beveridge Director/Writer Starting as a marine biology major in college, and working as a technical writer for an electronics manufacturer early on, Brian honed an edge of clarity and precision on his writing skills. After switching majors to broadcasting at the University of South Florida, Brian wrote news for the NBC affiliate in Tampa and produced educational films for Florida Power Company. On the business side, Brian has facilitated communications to both external and internal constituent audiences for Fortune 500 companies and non-profit corporations ranging from Shell Oil Company to Habitat for Humanity.


Paradigm Three

www.paradigmthree.com [cached]

Brian Beveridge, Gen.
Partner


Coal - Rising Tide North America

risingtidenorthamerica.org [cached]

wind up in West Oakland pockets," said Brian Beveridge, Co-Director of West


EBCitizen.com | Everywhere Since 2009: Oakland City Council Not On Board with Fossil Fuels Rolling Through

www.ebcitizen.com [cached]

"Ten years of advocacy have cleaned our windowsills of diesel soot," said Brian Beveridge, co-director at West Oakland Environmental Indicators Project.


This army base once drove West Oakland's economy. Now it drives discrimination. | Grist

grist.org [cached]

Now that construction has started, it might be too late, says Brian Beveridge, who has lived in the area since being driven out of San Francisco by rising rents in the late '90s.
Local activists say their concerns about the redevelopment project continue to fall on deaf ears. "Having a seat at the table doesn't really mean anything," Beveridge says, if decision-makers don't listen. "That just means they let you in the room." This spring, the West Oakland Environmental Indicators Project, a community group cofounded in 2004 by Beveridge and Margaret Gordon, reached its breaking point. Today, while the shells of former warehouses have become art collectives, heavy industries like metal recycler Custom Alloy Scrap Sales, which Beveridge says supplies high-end car manufacturer Tesla, operate catty-corner from homes. And the port keeps hauling in cargo - 2.37 million 20-foot containers in 2016 - and shuttling trucks through West Oakland's neighborhoods and onto the freeways. But little gets reinvested in the local economy, says Beveridge. Truckers may stop at a repair shop or a convenience store, but residents say the traffic makes it difficult for local businesses to thrive. "It's the economic engine of the region," Beveridge says. "It's just not the economic engine for West Oakland." Before it closed, the army base - which at one point employed 7,000 people - provided plenty of jobs for locals. The city has estimated its redevelopment project would bring thousands of new opportunities to an area that desperately needs economic investment. But Beveridge, Gordon, and other residents worry that the promise of jobs is intended to assuage the community's environmental opposition. (Positions are not guaranteed to go to West Oakland residents though the city has a goal of hiring half employees from Oakland.) The city, the Environmental Indicators Project team asserts, refuses to adequately invest in a comprehensive analysis of the increased pollution from truck traffic and industry - or develop a plan for how to reduce emissions. On a sunny Friday in June, Beveridge drives me down to the port in his white Ford pickup truck. "Usually there's trucks in both lanes and in four directions," he says above a classical symphony on the radio, as we turn towards the ocean. A few minutes later, we stop at 38-acre Middle Harbor Shoreline Park, a slice of picturesque land sandwiched between port terminals where cranes stack royal blue, mustard, and rust-colored corrugated containers. The port built the park as part of its "Vision 2000" initiative, during an earlier expansion of operations. It opened in 2004. "As beautiful as it is," Beveridge says, standing in the grass and looking across the water to San Francisco, "it couldn't be more surrounded by the port."


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