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2015-01-25T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Brent Waters?

Dr. Brent R. Waters

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Background Information

Employment History

Texas Memorial Museum of Science and History

International Association for Cryptologic Research

Stanford University

Assistant Professor of Computer Science

University of Texas at Austin

Program Chairs

SRIS P.C

Computer Scientist

SRI International

Principal Investigator

ACCURATE

Computer Scientist

SRI International

Affiliations

Fellow
Sloan

PC Member
WWW2006

Faculty Fellow
Microsoft Corporation

Education

B.S. degree

University of California at Los Angeles

Ph.D.

Computer Science

Princeton University

Web References (82 Total References)


ACM Grace Murray Hopper Award - ACM Award

awards.acm.org [cached]

Brent Waters (2015)

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Brent Waters
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2015 Grace Murray Hopper Award Recognizes Brent Waters
Brent Waters, recipient of the Grace Murray Hopper Award for the introduction and development of the concepts of attribute-based encryption and functional encryption. Waters' innovations enhance security efforts at a time when greater volumes of highly confidential data are moving to the cloud. Traditionally, public-key encryption makes use of a public key that targets ciphertexts to a specific user that holds one secret key. Waters' introduction of attribute-based encryption presented a new design where an administrator can create a policy-specific decryption key that will enable decryption of only the underlying files that satisfy the policy. Functional encryption, as conceived by Waters, takes things further by allowing an administrator to create private keys that allow a decryptor to learn only a particular function of the encrypted data, thus limiting their view to what they need to know about the data. Waters is an associate professor at the University of Texas at Austin. He has been named a Sloan Fellow, a Packard Fellow and a Microsoft Faculty Fellow. His many additional honors include receiving the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.


And we're pleased to offer our ...

www.thecyberwire.com [cached]

And we're pleased to offer our interview with Brent Waters, of the University of Texas at Austin, who's recently been honored with an early career award from the Association of Computing Machinery for his contributions to encryption. He'll be telling about one of those contributions: his work in functional encryption. (If you enjoy the Podcast, please share your enjoyment with an iTunes review.)


Computer Scientist Earns Prestigious ACM ...

www.thecyberwire.com [cached]

Computer Scientist Earns Prestigious ACM Award for Encryption Achievement (College of Natural Sciences, University of Texas at Austin) Brent Waters of The University of Texas at Austin has been selected to receive the Grace Murray Hopper Award from the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).


Brent Waters of the ...

membernet.acm.org [cached]

Brent Waters of the University of Texas at Austin has been named the recipient of the 2015 ACM Grace Murray Hopper Award for the introduction and development of the concepts of attribute-based and functional encryption. His innovations enhance security efforts at a time when greater volumes of highly confidential data are moving to the cloud.


Caption: Brent Waters, a ...

www.wired.com [cached]

Caption: Brent Waters, a computer scientist at the University of Texas, Austin, demonstrated how IO could be a powerful cryptographic tool.

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When Sahai and Brent Waters, a computer scientist at the University of Texas, Austin, described a way to use IO in 2013, it was largely a matter of belief that this style of obfuscation would protect the secrets inside a program.
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Brent Waters, a computer scientist at the University of Texas, Austin, demonstrated how IO could be a powerful cryptographic tool. Brent Waters, a computer scientist at the University of Texas, Austin, demonstrated how IO could be a powerful cryptographic tool.
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A year later, in April 2014, Waters, Bishop and Craig Gentry, a research scientist at the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, N.Y., released a pair of papers boiling the problem of IO down to a set of simple assumptions related to a type of mathematical object called multilinear maps. (Sahai was a co-author on one of the papers.) "We said if the attacker breaks [IO] in any way, he must be solving one of these problems," Bishop said.
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The center, which is devoted to obfuscation research, was founded in 2014 and is funded by a $5 million grant from the National Science Foundation, with Waters and Bishop as co-principal investigators.

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