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Wrong Brenda Aaron?

Brenda Bernadette Aaron

Commanding Officer

Women's Army Corps

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Women's Army Corps

Background Information

Employment History

Officer Commanding

Training Wing


GDF Training Schools


Malgre' Tout School at Pouderoyen


Lieutenant Colonel


Web References(5 Total References)


Brenda Bernadette Aaron

www.gdf-gy.org [cached]

Brenda Bernadette Aaron
Brenda Bernadette Aaron Brenda Aaron Brenda Bernadette Aaron was selected as one of the first women officer cadets and would later be appointed Commanding Officer of the Women's Army Corps (WAC). On 30th January 1967, she joined Clarissa Hookumchand, Hyacinth King and Joan Granger, the last of whom was appointed captain and officer commanding the WAC from the outset. A week later, they were joined by, fifty-six female regular strength of the GDF and posted to the Training Wing, where she assumed responsibility as Officer Commanding (OC) the women's training division and she supervised training for both female soldiers and young women recruited to the Guyana Youth Corps (GYC). During her period of service, Brenda Aaron was also appointed: Officer Commanding the Headquarters Company; Executive Officer, Base Command Timehri; Commanding Officer (CO) WAC (1981-83); and, Staff Officer 2, Force Headquarters (FHQ) (1983-1994). She was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in 1991, becoming the first woman to attain the rank in the Guyana Defence Force and probably, the Commonwealth Caribbean. Over the years, Brenda Aaron completed a number of professional courses which included the Officer Cadet Course (1967); Junior Command and Staff Course (1973); and WAC Administration at the Women's Royal Army Corps, UK (1975). She was also educated at the University of Guyana, where she gained the Diploma in Social Work (1975-79) and Bachelor of Social Science Degree. Born in 1945 in Friendship Village, ECD, Brenda Aaron attended the Roman Catholic School in Georgetown and subsequently taught at Buxton Congregational School and Malgre' Tout School at Pouderoyen, WCD. She is the recipient of the Military Efficiency Medal (1980); Military Commemoration Medal (1990); and Military Service Medal (1993). She retired from the GDF in August 1994.


WOMEN IN THE GUYANA DEFENSE FORCE

www.guyanaundersiege.com [cached]

In 30 January 1967, just three months after the Ankoko incident, four women-Captain Joan Granger and Officer Cadets Brenda Aaron, Clarissa Hookumchand and Hyacinth King - started training at the GDF Training Wing at what was then called Atkinson Field, now Timehri.
For example, Michalene Payne was trained at the British Army Public Relations Department; Joan Granger was trained at the Army School of Catering, and Brenda Aaron at the Women's Royal Army Corps (WRAC), all in the UK. In a survey entitled, "Women Soldiers of the Guyana Defence Force and their Effect on the Military Organisation in Terms of Roles," which studied the attitudes of men to women soldiers, Brenda Aaron found that 76 per cent of men felt that the presence of women soldiers created specific problems for the GDF administration in four major areas: fitness for the primary task of soldiering; pregnancy, children and the home; transitional period from civilian to military occupation and women's intimate relations with male superiors. Women sometimes combine the roles of soldier, wife, mother and, usually, homemaker and householder. Domestic problems often erupt which conflict with their occupational obligations and, consequently, have to be dealt with by the GDF administration. As a result, Aaron found, some male soldiers are skeptical about the presence of women in the Force because they felt that women's problems created increased organisational strains, making the men's burden heavier. [Editor's Note: This article has used information from various articles; Brenda Aaron, "The Women's Army Corps. Scarlet Beret, Vol. 1, No. 1 (February 1971), and "Women Soldiers of the Guyana Defence Force," Mimeo. University of Guyana, Guyana, 1978.


GDF cop Best Gym title

www.gdf-gy.org [cached]

Brenda Bernadette Aaron
GDF cop Best Gym title


Welcome to www.guyanachronicle.com --- GDF-Special

www.guyanachronicle.com [cached]

FIRST Lady Janet Jagan and Lieutenant Colonel Brenda Aaron, third from left, during the Women,s Army Corps 27th anniversary (Winston Oudkerk photo -1994)


Guyana's women soldiers: A question of identity

www.guyanareview.com [cached]

On 30 January 1967, just three months after the Ankoko incident, four women – Captain Joan Granger and Officer Cadets Brenda Aaron, Clarissa Hookumchand and Hyacinth King – started training at the GDF Training Wing at what was then called Atkinson Field, now Timehri.For example, Michalene Payne was trained at the British Army Public Relations Department; Joan Granger was trained at the Army School of Catering, and Brenda Aaron at the Women's Royal Army Corps (WRAC), all in the UK.In a survey entitled "Women Soldiers of the Guyana Defence Force and their Effect on the Military Organisation in Terms of Roles", which studied the attitudes of men to women soldiers, Brenda Aaron found that 76 per cent of men felt that the presence of women soldiers created specific problems for the GDF administration in four major areas: fitness for the primary task of soldiering; pregnancy, children and the home; transitional period from civilian to military occupation and women's intimate relations with male superiors.Women sometimes combine the roles of soldier, wife, mother and, usually, homemaker and householder.Domestic problems often erupt which conflict with their occupational obligations and, consequently, have to be dealt with by the GDF administration.As a result, Aaron found, some male soldiers are skeptical about the presence of women in the Force because they felt that women's problems created increased organisational strains, making the men's burden heavier.These issues seemed to be insoluble, the GDF largely skirting around the debate and contenting itself with simply employing women to perform their traditional trades.This course of action avoids unpleasantness and achieves the aim of freeing men to perform operational tasks. ProblemDespite the claim that it was always part of the plan to enlist women into the GDF on the basis of equality with men, the regulatory framework for protecting women from abuse, and for ensuring good order and military discipline, has been inadequate.This article has used information from articles: Brenda Aaron, "The Women's Army Corps".


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