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Wrong Brandi Hart?

Brandi Hart

Showcase Songwriter

IBMAs World

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Background Information

Employment History

Administrator, Freelance Graphic Designer

The Crooked Road: Virginia's Heritage Music Trail


Affiliations

The Dixie Bee-Liners

Co-Founder


International Bluegrass Music Association

Members


DBL

Co-Founder


Web References(75 Total References)


dixiebeeliners.com

The band is focused around the singing/songwriting team of Buddy Woodward and Brandi Hart, and Buddy tells us that the new CD will have a new music focus: The music is all original, we will be reprising two songs from our first limited-release CD-EP, plus a whole batch of new tunes that Brandi and I wrote over the winter and spring - including one we co-wrote with Blue Highways Tim Stafford, and another we co-wrote with producer Bil VornDick.
The band is focused around the singing/songwriting team of Buddy Woodward and Brandi Hart, and Buddy tells us that the new CD will have a new music focus: The music is all original, we will be reprising two songs from our first limited-release CD-EP, plus a whole batch of new tunes that Brandi and I wrote over the winter and spring - including one we co-wrote with Blue Highways Tim Stafford, and another we co-wrote with producer Bil VornDick. In addition to Buddy on mandolin and Brandi on guitar, Ripe will feature fellow Bee-Liners Rachel Johnson on fiddle and Sam Morrow on banjo, along with guest appearances from Mark Fain and Andy Leftwich (Ricky Skaggs & Kentucky Thunder) on bass and mandolin/fiddle respectively, ex-Grascal David Talbot on banjo, and dobro player Travis Toy from Rascal Flatts. It gives an overview of the band - and their story of meeting and starting a bluegrass band in New York, and then moving to Virginia - along with a photo of Brandi Hart and Buddy Woodward touring the Gibson custom shop. Brandi Hart and Buddy Woodwards clever merging of the Big Apple and the Appalachians, of Bible Belt-noir and near-holy harmonies, has swept their contemporaries under the rug and clean off the bluegrass charts. Though theyre now based in Abingdon, VA, where Hart says there's a banjo in every pot and a picker in every parlor, Hart and Woodward first met in New York City. This eight-track CD showcases the superlative singing and songwriting of Brandi Hart and Buddy Woodward. The Bee-Liners are Brandi Hart and Buddy Woodward, both accomplished bluegrass players, singers and songwriters. Brandi will be a showcase songwriter at IBMAs World of Bluegrass this fall, and Buddy will be appearing before audiences throughout the south this fall reprising his multiple roles in the touring show for Man Of Constant Sorrow: The Story of the Stanley Brothers, originally staged at The Barter Theater in Abingdon, VA. Buddy credits Tim and Doug for much of this success of this new set of tracks, which also feature Ned Luberecki on banjo, and Travis Toy (of Rascal Flatts) on dobro, along with Buddy on mandolin, Brandi on guitar, Tim Crouch on fiddle and Doug Deforest on bass. Returning to the theme expressed in the title of this post, Brandi and Buddy have recently made the move from NYC to Abingdon, both to be closer to Barter Theater and Virginias Crooked Road project (with whom they have worked closely), and to live amongst the mountains, the music and the people where the seeds of their sound were initially sown. Brandi Hart, a heartbreakingly good singer, and multi-instrumentalist Buddy Woodward have decided to move their act from the more frenetic New York City to the more bucolic Abingdon. An e-mail interview with Woodward and Hart reveals a ration of goofiness but a reverence for the music and the audience. BRANDI HART: Alan Young, who puts out the New York-based e-newsletter Trifectagram, came up with the tag. BUDDY WOODWARD: A couple years ago a friend sent Brandi & I a notice from Craig's List about NY auditions for a touring company of the Barter Theatre's "Keep On The Sunny Side: The Story of The Carter Family. BRANDI HART: We'd been wanting to leave New York for a long time, both for career purposes and just plain mental health. BRANDI HART: It was clear that we needed to relocate if we're going to take The Dixie Bee-Liners to the next level. BRANDI HART: Yeah, I wrote a LOT of songs on the subway. BRANDI HART: As for "Bible Belt Noir," it's not meant to be sacrilegious. Once people hear us, they realize immediately that we come from a long tradition of lonesome-sounding mountain music and spooky old hymns... no matter how "uptown" we get. (And we live on 177th Street -- that's waaaaay uptown.) No offense to anyone else in the band, but why isn't Brandi already a superstar? BRANDI HART: Honestly, Buddy taught me everything I know. HART: We'd love to play Blacksburg or Roanoke! "No one would intentionally move to New York to start a bluegrass band," says Bee-Liner lead singer and guitarist Brandi Hart. "Well, no one but Buddy. And you'd just have to ask him about his sanity." Hart and multi-instrumentalist Buddy Woodward form the core of the Dixie Bee-Liners. Everybody did," says Hart. "We had to prove ourselves at IBMA. Of course anybody has to prove themselves in bluegrass!" Hart moved to New York from Nicholasville, KY in 1998 to pursue modern dance. "It was a real good excuse to leave my hometown," she says. She says Woodward refers to himself as a "Navy brat," but he spent time in Maryland and the Washington, D.C., area (which is a bluegrass hotbed) and in California. The two met in October 2001, when both were working on a Loretta Lynn tribute show. "Buddy heard me sing one song and asked me to marry him and start a band," says Hart. "I had been in a little country band that performed at parties," says Hart, "But this was really my first professional gig. I learned while I earned. I'd be onstage with my knees knockin'." The group was originally called The String Club for Men, with Hart being the one non-male member. However, the group changed to the Dixie Bee-Liners, after a stretch of Kentucky's Highway 41. The band really began to hone their chops at a New York club called the Parkside Lounge, one of the few places that gave local bluegrass bands a place to play. "New York City has a lot of avid music fans, but everyone is so exhausted from working to pay rent.... You have to really hustle to get a crowd out," says Hart. "We can't wait to get out of New York," says Hart. BRANDI HART: Kentucky, by way of New York City. Brandi Hart, along with songwriting partner Buddy Woodward, fronts the Dixie Bee-Liners, an emerging new band focusing on the kind of pure, unadulterated Bluegrass music that our forefathers (well, not THAT "fore" ...) listened to in the hills of Appalachia. But Hart, 30, didn't imagine until just a few years ago that this was what she'd be doing. Despite spending her youth singing in Baptist church choirs in her home state -- living in Somerset before moving to Lexington as a kid -- Hart's experience in on-stage showmanship had seen her as a part of a rock band. Then she sought out schools in New York City to study modern dance. But none of that stuck. "Some people grew up around this type of music their whole lives, and people always told me I should sing country," said Hart. "I guess it was sort of a rebellion against my own culture (that led me to try other things).... There's not much modern dance in Kentucky, so I was curious to see what it was all about." Getting a bit homesick in the big city, Hart decided she'd like to start a country band. Things fell into place at a Loretta Lynn tribute show, where Hart was approached by Woodward, who liked what he heard from Hart. "He said, 'Man, we've got to start a Bluegrass band'," said Hart of Woodward's proposal that brought the Dixie Bee-Liners to life. "So he kind of dragged me along, kicking and screaming, and here we are three years later with all sorts of good things happening." Hart doesn't sound like she has any regrets about the way things turned out -- "(Dance) was a great ticket out of the job market in Kentucky" -- but admits she often misses the "slower pace of things" here. Still, New York has its advantages. "I love the people in New York, they're what's so fantastic about the city," said Hart. "You always meet new and exciting people. A lot of people are here for artistic reasons; half my [apartment] building it seems are musicians and filmmakers. It's always an adventure." And because of the myriad examples of diversity there, New Yorkers are more accepting of so-called "Hillbilly Music" than one might think. "It's a real interesting situation," said Hart. "They like their Bluegrass real straight and real traditional. So many people who love Klezmer music (Jewish folk music) also love Bluegrass, and those who play straight folk and straight country. There's such an interesting cross-polination -- New Yorkers have a broad spectrum of music they love: Country, Bluegrass, Classical, Afro-Cuban Jazz, you name it. They have a broad appreciation for diversity in music." Different cultures have influenced Hart's music, too. Hart will tell you about how the music that came over from the British Isles played a hand in developing her art form, and one can definitely hear hints of Celtic sounds in the mix. This is the music of the "old country" -- America's version of the old country, that is. Listeners will find the vocals to be sturdy and at times haunting -- these are no just-off-the-street warblers, their voices pack a wallop that sounds carefully honed, regardless of genre. The distinctive Bluegrass twang is there, with tricky and furious instrumentals that render you unable to keep from tapping your foot, even if you're not an avid fan of Appalachian sounds. Hart apprenticed under several Bluegrass and Country purists in New York -- "until we realized that I was writing more songs than all my mentors put together! Now Hart plays rhythm guitar and Nashville -- or high-strung -- guitar, which has several strings an octave higher to create a "chimey effect," as Hart calls it. Hart loves the idea of the "concept album" and is planning one called Flora and Fauna to come out in the near future, inspired by nature -- and said there was enough material in the works of Manly Wade Wellman to do one inspired by him. It's kind of like Appalachian sci-fi," observed Hart, who based her song "Yellow-Haired Girl" on one of Wellman's characters. "People were pretty excited about our music," said Hart. "It felt like a huge success to us. For Hart, the prospect of that latter concert appearance would be a dream come true -- a sign of success mixed with a taste of home. Reproduction in whole or in part without express permission from Brandi Hart and The Dixie Bee-Liners is strictly prohibited.


www.thebluegrassblog.com [cached]

I contacted the artistic brain trust of the band, the singing/songwriting team of Brandi Hart and Buddy Woodward, to get their impressions of their first-time visit to the XM Nashville studio.Brandi Hart as imagined by JD MorrowBrandi: They might have dropped us from the playlist after that.Brandi: Sadly, nobody thought to bring a camera to the studio, but we do have artistic representations, expertly rendered by a well-respected southwestern Virginia illustrator.The band is the brainchild of guitarist/vocalist Brandi Hart and mandolinist Buddy Woodward who got the band started in New York.We caught up with co-band leaders Brandi and Buddy for a tag-team interview yesterday.Brandi: We are absolutely psyched to see RIPE hit the streets!We have been amazingly blessed to have the opportunity to record for Pinecastle and to work with such talented people on this new project.We're very proud of the record, and I'm thrilled to say that, so far, we've gotten a great reaction from DJ's and fans alike.I was curious how things look to them now as compared to when they released their self-produced EP/CD.Brandi: When we released the EP back in 2005, we were doing a lot of dreaming and planning for the future.This Christmas dialog comes from Brandi Hart and Buddy Woodward of The Dixie Bee-Liners. 'Nuff said… BRANDI: We tore out each other's hair…BRANDI: And relieved!BRANDI: Nipper was the "Music City Kitty."He was a brave little guy, and believe it or not, he loved country and bluegrass music.BRANDI: Did he ever go for the banjo?BRANDI: Smart kitty!BRANDI: That was all kinds of fun, right Buddy?BRANDI: Keep in mind, we were starving artists.BUDDY: No health insurance.BRANDI: Don't you know.BUDDY: After the vet bills, the doctor bills, the pharmacy bills….BRANDI: Not to mention CD manufacturing and production costs….BRANDI: No, we weren't.BRANDI: Yeah, we got a wreath from the mini market and hung it on one of our mic stands, using 1/4 jacks for ornaments.BRANDI: So anyway, we get Buddy home and back in bed, a bottle of Percodan clutched in his feverish paw…and the first thing our other cat, Fang, does is jump right up on Buddy and start kneading on his skin.BRANDI: OUCH.BRANDI: In his own cat way, I think Fang was trying to help.BRANDI: Well yeah, it was our last Christmas in New York — right before all kinds of wonderful and exciting things started to happen to us as a result of putting out that first CD….Band principals Brandi Hart, a Lexington, KY native, joined Buddy Woodward in his native New York city where the group got its start.Brandi worked in marketing and design while Buddy did stage work until they decided that a move to Virginia was the best course to pursue a career in and around bluegrass music.Woodward had worked previously in a production of a play based on the life and career of The Stanley Brothers at Barter Theater in Abingdon, VA and Hart had a job offer from The Crooked Road - Virginia's Heritage Music Trail, also based in Abingdon.The result, produced by Bil VornDick and featuring original material written by Woodward and Hart, is due in April of 2008.Brandi took advantage of her own graphics background and design experience and handled art-direction for the project herself.Two weeks ago at IBMA John and I, along with Brandi Hart of The Dixie Bee Liners, conducted a seminar, the official title being Establishing & Maintaining an Effective Web Presence.The band is focused around the singing/songwriting team of Buddy Woodward and Brandi Hart, and Buddy tells us that the new CD will have a new music focus."The music is all original, we will be reprising two songs from our first limited-release CD-EP, plus a whole batch of new tunes that Brandi and I wrote over the winter and spring - including one we co-wrote with Blue Highway's Tim Stafford, and another we co-wrote with producer Bil VornDick.It will be everything fans have come to expect from us, ranging from hard-core bluegrass to a few envelope-pushing diversions along the way.There will be a little something for everybody."In addition to Buddy on mandolin and Brandi on guitar, Ripe will feature fellow Bee-Liners Rachel Johnson on fiddle and Sam Morrow on banjo, along with guest appearances from Mark Fain and Andy Leftwich (Ricky Skaggs & Kentucky Thunder) on bass and mandolin/fiddle respectively, ex-Grascal David Talbot on banjo, and dobro player Travis Toy from Rascal Flatts.It gives an overview of the band - and their story of meeting and starting a bluegrass band in New York, and then moving to Virginia - along with a photo of Brandi Hart and Buddy Woodward touring the Gibson custom shop.The Bee-Liners are Brandi Hart and Buddy Woodward, both accomplished bluegrass players, singers and songwriters.Brandi will be a showcase songwriter at IBMA's World of Bluegrass this fall, and Buddy will be appearing before audiences throughout the south this fall reprising his multiple roles in the touring show for Man Of Constant Sorrow: The Story of the Stanley Brothers, originally staged at The Barter Theater in Abingdon, VA.


www.dixiebeeliners.com

The band is focused around the singing/songwriting team of Buddy Woodward and Brandi Hart, and Buddy tells us that the new CD will have a new music focus: "The music is all original, we will be reprising two songs from our first limited-release CD-EP, plus a whole batch of new tunes that Brandi and I wrote over the winter and spring - including one we co-wrote with Blue Highway's Tim Stafford, and another we co-wrote with producer Bil VornDick.
The band is focused around the singing/songwriting team of Buddy Woodward and Brandi Hart, and Buddy tells us that the new CD will have a new music focus: "The music is all original, we will be reprising two songs from our first limited-release CD-EP, plus a whole batch of new tunes that Brandi and I wrote over the winter and spring - including one we co-wrote with Blue Highway's Tim Stafford, and another we co-wrote with producer Bil VornDick. In addition to Buddy on mandolin and Brandi on guitar, Ripe will feature fellow Bee-Liners Rachel Johnson on fiddle and Sam Morrow on banjo, along with guest appearances from Mark Fain and Andy Leftwich (Ricky Skaggs & Kentucky Thunder) on bass and mandolin/fiddle respectively, ex-Grascal David Talbot on banjo, and dobro player Travis Toy from Rascal Flatts. It gives an overview of the band - and their story of meeting and starting a bluegrass band in New York, and then moving to Virginia - along with a photo of Brandi Hart and Buddy Woodward touring the Gibson custom shop. Brandi Hart and Buddy Woodward's clever merging of the Big Apple and the Appalachians, of Bible Belt-noir and near-holy harmonies, has swept their contemporaries under the rug and clean off the bluegrass charts. Though they're now based in Abingdon, VA, where Hart says "there's a banjo in every pot and a picker in every parlor," Hart and Woodward first met in New York City. During their shared gig as cast members in a 2001 Loretta Lynn tribute show, Woodward first heard Hart's honeyed voice. This eight-track CD showcases the superlative singing and songwriting of Brandi Hart and Buddy Woodward. The Bee-Liners are Brandi Hart and Buddy Woodward, both accomplished bluegrass players, singers and songwriters. Brandi will be a showcase songwriter at IBMA's World of Bluegrass this fall, and Buddy will be appearing before audiences throughout the south this fall reprising his multiple roles in the touring show for Man Of Constant Sorrow: The Story of the Stanley Brothers, originally staged at The Barter Theater in Abingdon, VA. Buddy credits Tim and Doug for much of this success of this new set of tracks, which also feature Ned Luberecki on banjo, and Travis Toy (of Rascal Flatts) on dobro, along with Buddy on mandolin, Brandi on guitar, Tim Crouch on fiddle and Doug Deforest on bass. Returning to the theme expressed in the title of this post, Brandi and Buddy have recently made the move from NYC to Abingdon, both to be closer to Barter Theater and Virginia's Crooked Road project (with whom they have worked closely), and to live amongst the mountains, the music and the people where the seeds of their sound were initially sown. Brandi Hart, a heartbreakingly good singer, and multi-instrumentalist Buddy Woodward have decided to move their act from the more frenetic New York City to the more bucolic Abingdon. An e-mail interview with Woodward and Hart reveals a ration of goofiness but a reverence for the music and the audience. BRANDI HART: Alan Young, who puts out the New York-based e-newsletter Trifectagram, came up with the tag. BUDDY WOODWARD: A couple years ago a friend sent Brandi & I a notice from Craig's List about NY auditions for a touring company of the Barter Theatre's "Keep On The Sunny Side: The Story of The Carter Family. BRANDI HART: We'd been wanting to leave New York for a long time, both for career purposes and just plain mental health. BRANDI HART: It was clear that we needed to relocate if we're going to take The Dixie Bee-Liners to the next level. BRANDI HART: Yeah, I wrote a LOT of songs on the subway. BRANDI HART: As for "Bible Belt Noir," it's not meant to be sacrilegious. Once people hear us, they realize immediately that we come from a long tradition of lonesome-sounding mountain music and spooky old hymns... no matter how "uptown" we get. (And we live on 177th Street -- that's waaaaay uptown.) No offense to anyone else in the band, but why isn't Brandi already a superstar? BRANDI HART: Honestly, Buddy taught me everything I know. HART: We'd love to play Blacksburg or Roanoke! "No one would intentionally move to New York to start a bluegrass band," says Bee-Liner lead singer and guitarist Brandi Hart. "Well, no one but Buddy. And you'd just have to ask him about his sanity." Hart and multi-instrumentalist Buddy Woodward form the core of the Dixie Bee-Liners. Everybody did," says Hart. "We had to prove ourselves at IBMA. Of course anybody has to prove themselves in bluegrass!" Hart moved to New York from Nicholasville, KY in 1998 to pursue modern dance. "It was a real good excuse to leave my hometown," she says. She says Woodward refers to himself as a "Navy brat," but he spent time in Maryland and the Washington, D.C., area (which is a bluegrass hotbed) and in California. The two met in October 2001, when both were working on a Loretta Lynn tribute show. "Buddy heard me sing one song and asked me to marry him and start a band," says Hart. "I had been in a little country band that performed at parties," says Hart, "But this was really my first professional gig. I learned while I earned. I'd be onstage with my knees knockin'." The group was originally called The String Club for Men, with Hart being the one non-male member. However, the group changed to the Dixie Bee-Liners, after a stretch of Kentucky's Highway 41. The band really began to hone their chops at a New York club called the Parkside Lounge, one of the few places that gave local bluegrass bands a place to play. "New York City has a lot of avid music fans, but everyone is so exhausted from working to pay rent.... You have to really hustle to get a crowd out," says Hart. "We can't wait to get out of New York," says Hart. BRANDI HART: Kentucky, by way of New York City. Brandi Hart, along with songwriting partner Buddy Woodward, fronts the Dixie Bee-Liners, an emerging new band focusing on the kind of pure, unadulterated Bluegrass music that our forefathers (well, not THAT "fore" ...) listened to in the hills of Appalachia. But Hart, 30, didn't imagine until just a few years ago that this was what she'd be doing. Despite spending her youth singing in Baptist church choirs in her home state -- living in Somerset before moving to Lexington as a kid -- Hart's experience in on-stage showmanship had seen her as a part of a rock band. Then she sought out schools in New York City to study modern dance. But none of that stuck. "Some people grew up around this type of music their whole lives, and people always told me I should sing country," said Hart. "I guess it was sort of a rebellion against my own culture (that led me to try other things).... There's not much modern dance in Kentucky, so I was curious to see what it was all about." Getting a bit homesick in the big city, Hart decided she'd like to start a country band. Things fell into place at a Loretta Lynn tribute show, where Hart was approached by Woodward, who liked what he heard from Hart. "He said, 'Man, we've got to start a Bluegrass band'," said Hart of Woodward's proposal that brought the Dixie Bee-Liners to life. "So he kind of dragged me along, kicking and screaming, and here we are three years later with all sorts of good things happening." Hart doesn't sound like she has any regrets about the way things turned out -- "(Dance) was a great ticket out of the job market in Kentucky" -- but admits she often misses the "slower pace of things" here. Still, New York has its advantages. "I love the people in New York, they're what's so fantastic about the city," said Hart. "You always meet new and exciting people. A lot of people are here for artistic reasons; half my [apartment] building it seems are musicians and filmmakers. It's always an adventure." And because of the myriad examples of diversity there, New Yorkers are more accepting of so-called "Hillbilly Music" than one might think. "It's a real interesting situation," said Hart. "They like their Bluegrass real straight and real traditional. So many people who love Klezmer music (Jewish folk music) also love Bluegrass, and those who play straight folk and straight country. There's such an interesting cross-polination -- New Yorkers have a broad s


www.thebluegrassblog.com [cached]

The Bee-Liners are Brandi Hart and Buddy Woodward, both accomplished bluegrass players, singers and songwriters.Brandi will be a showcase songwriter at IBMA's World of Bluegrass this fall, and Buddy will be appearing before audiences throughout the south this fall reprising his multiple roles in the touring show for Man Of Constant Sorrow: The Story of the Stanley Brothers, originally staged at The Barter Theater in Abingdon, VA.Buddy credits Tim and Doug for much of this success of this new set of tracks, which also feature Ned Luberecki on banjo, and Travis Troy (of Rascal Flatts) on dobro, along with Buddy on mandolin, Brandi on guitar, Tim Crouch on fiddle and Doug Deforest on bass.Returning to the theme expressed in the title of this post, Brandi and Buddy have recently made the move from NYC to Abingdon, both to be closer to Barter Theater and Virginia's Crooked Road project (with whom they have worked closely), and to live amongst the mountains, the music and the people where the seeds of their sound were initially sown.


milfordalive.com [cached]

Country singers Brandi Hart and Jen Larson add gritty harmonies for several songs, while Rench takes vocal duties on most choruses.


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