Need more? Try out  Advanced Search (20+ criteria)»

Last Update

is this you? Claim your profile.

Wrong Brad Aagaard?

Brad Aagaard

Geophysicist

U.S. Geological Survey

HQ Phone:  (703) 648-4000

Email: b***@***.gov

GET ZOOMINFO GROW

+ Get 10 Free Contacts a Month

Please agree to the terms and conditions.

I agree to the  Terms of Service and  Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Grow at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

THANK YOU FOR DOWNLOADING!

computers
  • 1.Download
    ZoomInfo Grow
    v sign
  • 2.Run Installation
    Wizard
  • 3.Check your inbox to
    Sign in to ZoomInfo Grow

I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

U.S. Geological Survey

12201 Sunrise Valley Drive

Reston, Virginia,20192

United States

Company Description

The USGS lunar calibration program provides radiometric calibration and sensor stability monitoring for space-based remote sensing instruments using the Moon as a reference source. This is a unique on-orbit calibration technique for solar reflectance wavelengt... more.

Find other employees at this company (7,254)

Background Information

Employment History

Southern California Earthquake Center


Geophysicist

USGS


Affiliations

Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics

Chair of Science Steering Committee


Science Steering Committee

Members


National Science Foundation

Chair of Science Steering Committee


Web References(77 Total References)


www.techwire.net

As of Sunday afternoon, the Bay Area's larger and more volatile faults remained quiet, said Brad Aagaard, a geophysicist with the U.S. Geological Survey.
"As time goes on, the chances of a large earthquake happening as a result of this one decrease," Aagaard said of the South Napa quake. Aagaard said Sunday it could be days before scientists are able to pinpoint the fault where the Napa quake occurred at 3:20 a.m., about 6.6 miles below the earth's surface. It happened near - and possibly within - the West Napa fault system, he said, but slightly to the south, in an area that is not well-mapped. On Aug. 5, the USGS recorded a magnitude-3.0 quake within 10 kilometers, he said.


www.marinij.com

Tuesday's quakes were among 80 aftershocks, including four stronger than 3.0, since the Sunday morning temblor, said Brad Aagaard, a geophysicist with U.S. Geological Survey.


www.dailyrepublic.com

Brad Aagaard, a seismologist at the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park, said there was a small seismic "event" recorded on Aug. 5 near the area of Sunday's quake.
But it wasn't any kind of sign. "In the past three weeks, there's been no indication in that immediate area that this was going to happen," Aagaard said. According to Aagaard, scientists will be looking for cracks at the surface. A magnitude-7 quake would have three times that length, Aagaard said. Q: How long can we expect aftershocks and how strong will they be? A: There have already been more than 50 aftershocks since Sunday's earthquake. All have been greater than magnitude 1, with the largest - so far - at 3.6 at 5:45 a.m. Sunday. "We expect they will occur less frequently but they won't necessarily be smaller," Aagaard said. There is a 50 percent chance of a magnitude-5 aftershock happening in the next week, he said.


www.pearlcitybank.com

Brad Aagaard , a seismologist at the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park , said there was a small seismic "event" recorded on Aug. 5 near the area of Sunday's quake.
But it wasn't any kind of sign. "In the past three weeks, there's been no indication in that immediate area that this was going to happen," Aagaard said. According to Aagaard, scientists will be looking for cracks at the surface. A magnitude-7 quake would have three times that length, Aagaard said. Q: How long can we expect aftershocks and how strong will they be? A: There have already been more than 50 aftershocks since Sunday's earthquake. All have been greater than magnitude 1, with the largest ? so far ? at 3.6 at 5:45 a.m. Sunday . "We expect they will occur less frequently but they won't necessarily be smaller," Aagaard said. There is a 50 percent chance of a magnitude-5 aftershock happening in the next week, he said.


www.ukiahdailyjournal.com

As of early Sunday afternoon, the Bay Area's larger and more volatile Hayward Fault remained quiet, which is "a good sign," said Brad Aagaard, a geophysicist with the U.S. Geological Survey.
"As time goes on, the chances of a large earthquake happening as a result of this one decrease," Aagaard said. Aagaard said scientists were still pinpointing the fault where the quake occurred at 3:20 a.m., about 6.6 miles below the earth's surface. It happened near -- and possibly within -- the West Napa fault system, he said, but slightly to the south, in an area that is not yet well-mapped. On Aug. 5, the USGS recorded a magnitude-3 quake in the vicinity -- within 10 kilometers, he said. The system is not fully operational or available to the public, but this was its biggest test yet in the Bay Area, Aagaard said. Ten seconds might not seem like a long time, but it can give BART trains and drivers a chance to slow down, he said, and people a moment to duck under their desks if they're at work.


Similar Profiles

city

Browse ZoomInfo's Business
Contact Directory by City

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory