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Wrong Bowe Bergdahl?

Bowe R. Bergdahl

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The Virginia Gazette


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www.vagazette.com

Bowe Bergdahl defers entering a plea during arraignment
Bowe Bergdahl Bowe Bergdahl Bowe Bergdahl, the soldier held prisoner for years by the Taliban after leaving his post in Afghanistan. This undated file image provided by the U.S. Army shows Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, the soldier held prisoner for years by the Taliban after leaving his post in Afghanistan. (Uncredited / AP) Tribune wire reports Contact Reporter U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, who disappeared in Afghanistan in 2009 and was held by the Taliban for five years, appeared Tuesday before a military judge on charges of desertion and misbehavior before the enemy. Bergdahl was arraigned during a short hearing and deferred entering a plea and did not decide whether he wants to face a court-martial with a jury or one with just a judge. He said little beyond answering "yes" and "no" to questions about whether he understood his rights and the court proceedings. He wore an Army dress uniform with a dark blue jacket and pants and had closely cropped hair. He appeared demure, sitting mostly still in his chair then walking deliberately with his head down as he left the courtroom. He talked quietly with his military attorney before and after the hearing. If convicted at a general court-martial, Bergdahl could get life in prison on the misbehavior charge and up to five years for desertion. Bergdahl, 29, of Hailey, Idaho, walked off his post in eastern Afghanistan's Paktika province on June 30, 2009. He was released in late May 2014 as part of a prisoner swap, in exchange for five detainees in Guantanamo Bay. The move touched off a firestorm of criticism, with some in Congress accusing President Barack Obama of jeopardizing the safety of the country with the exchange. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl to face charges in court-martial Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl to face charges in court-martial Tribune wire reports A court-martial is the next step in the military's case against Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, who was held captive by the Taliban for five years and freed in a controversial exchange for five detainees in Guantanamo Bay. Bergdahl, 29, of Hailey, Idaho, walked off his post in eastern Afghanistan's Paktika... A court-martial is the next step in the military's case against Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, who was held captive by the Taliban for five years and freed in a controversial exchange for five detainees in Guantanamo Bay. Bergdahl, 29, of Hailey, Idaho, walked off his post in eastern Afghanistan's Paktika... Donald Trump says Bowe Bergdahl should have been executed Donald Trump says Bowe Bergdahl should have been executed Bowe Bergdahl should have been executed for leaving his post in Afghanistan. "We're tired of Sgt. Bergdahl, who's a traitor, a no-good traitor, who should have been executed," Trump said to cheers at a rowdy rally inside... Bowe Bergdahl should have been executed for leaving his post in Afghanistan. "We're tired of Sgt. Bergdahl, who's a traitor, a no-good traitor, who should have been executed," Trump said to cheers at a rowdy rally inside... Bowe Bergdahl Officers stress dangers involved in search for Bowe Bergdahl Bowe Bergdahl faces rarely used charge of misbehavior before the enemy


www.vagazette.com

Bowe Bergdahl to face charges in court-martial
Bowe Bergdahl Bowe Bergdahl Bowe Bergdahl. U.S. Army shows Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl. (AP) Tribune wire reports Contact Reporter A court-martial is the next step in the military's case against Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, who was held captive by the Taliban for five years and freed in a controversial exchange for five detainees in Guantanamo Bay. Bergdahl, 29, of Hailey, Idaho, walked off his post in eastern Afghanistan's Paktika province on June 30, 2009. He was released in late May 2014 as part of a prisoner swap that touched off a firestorm of criticism, with some in Congress accusing President Barack Obama of jeopardizing the safety of a nation by exchanging five Taliban detainees at the military prison in Cuba for Bergdahl. Eugene Fidell, Bowe Bergdahl, Kenneth Dahl Eugene Fidell, Bowe Bergdahl, Kenneth Dahl Bowe Bergdahl, left, and defense lead counsel Eugene Fidell, center, look on as Maj. Bergdahl will be court-martialed, Friday, Sept. 18, 2015, at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. (AP Photo/Brigitte Woosley) Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, left, and defense lead counsel Eugene Fidell, center, look on as Maj. Bergdahl will be court-martialed, Friday, Sept. 18, 2015, at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. (AP Photo/Brigitte Woosley) (Brigitte Woosley / AP) The U.S. Army Forces Command charged Bergdahl on March 25 with "desertion with intent to shirk important or hazardous duty" and "misbehavior before the enemy by endangering the safety of a command, unit or place. If convicted, Bergdahl could get life in prison on the misbehavior charge and up to five years for desertion. He also could be dishonorably discharged, reduced in rank and made to forfeit all pay. Bergdahl's disappearance and the possibility that he might face light punishment had angered many in the military, given that his fellow soldiers took considerable risks in searching for him. The Pentagon has said no one died while searching for Bergdahl. Bowe Bergdahl to face most serious kind of court-martial in Army desertion case Bowe Bergdahl to face most serious kind of court-martial in Army desertion case Bowe Bergdahl will face general court-martial in connection with his 2009 disappearance from his base in Afghanistan, the service announced on Monday, raising the possibility that the soldier could face life in prison after being held captive for five years. Bergdahl, 29, is charged with... Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl will face general court-martial in connection with his 2009 disappearance from his base in Afghanistan, the service announced on Monday, raising the possibility that the soldier could face life in prison after being held captive for five years. Bergdahl, 29, is charged with... In October, Trump called Bergdahl a "traitor, a no-good traitor, who should have been executed." The House committee last week issued a 98-page report criticizing the Obama administration's decision to swap the five former Taliban leaders for Bergdahl. Fidell said he read that as a call to "hammer" Bergdahl for his actions. Bergdahl hasn't spoken publicly about his decision to walk away from his post, his subsequent five-year imprisonment by the Taliban or the prisoner swap in May 2014 that secured his return to the United States. But during the past several months, he spoke extensively with screenwriter Mark Boal, who shared about 25 hours of the recorded interviews with Sarah Koenig for her popular podcast "Serial." Bergdahl says in the interviews that he walked off his base to cause a crisis that would catch the attention of military brass. He wanted to warn them about what he believed were serious problems with leadership in his unit. And he wanted to prove himself as a real-life action hero, like someone out of a movie. "As a private first-class, nobody is going to listen to me," Bergdahl says in the first episode of the podcast, released Thursday. "No one is going to take me serious that an investigation needs to be put underway." Bergdahl acknowledges his motives weren't entirely idealistic. "I was trying to prove to myself, I was trying to prove to the world, to anybody who used to know me ... I was capable of being what I appeared to be," Bergdahl says. "I had this fantastic idea that I was going to prove to the world I was the real thing." He also discusses the psychological torment of being held captive for years. "How do I explain to a person that just standing in an empty dark room hurts? Bergdahl recounts. Bowe Bergdahl Donald Trump says Bowe Bergdahl should have been executed


www.vagazette.com

Bowe Bergdahl to face most serious kind of court-martial in Army desertion case
Bowe Bergdahl Bowe Bergdahl U.S. Army The attorney for Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, who was released in exchange for five Taliban detainees from Guantanamo Bay, says the soldier's case has been referred for trial by a general court-martial. (AP Photo/U.S. Army, File) The attorney for Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, who was released in exchange for five Taliban detainees from Guantanamo Bay, says the soldier's case has been referred for trial by a general court-martial. (AP Photo/U.S. Army, File) (U.S. Army) Bowe Bergdahl will face general court-martial in connection with his 2009 disappearance from his base in Afghanistan, the service announced on Monday, raising the possibility that the soldier could face life in prison after being held captive for five years. Bergdahl, 29, is charged with desertion and misbehavior before the enemy. He has been a political lightning rod since he was exchanged in May 2014 in a prisoner swap approved by the White House in which five Taliban officials were released from the military prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and kept under supervised watch in Qatar. It came after Bergdahl broke his silence last week by participating in the popular podcast "Serial. The weekly podcast obtained 25 hours of recorded conversations between Bergdahl and film producer Mark Boal with Bergdahl's approval. The decision is more severe than what was recommended by an Army officer, Lt. Col. Mark Visger, who oversaw a two-day hearing for Bergdahl's case in September, according to Bergdahl's lawyer. Visger recommended that Bergdahl face a lower form of judicial proceeding known as a special court-martial, which would have come with a maximum penalty of 12 months of confinement. An arraignment hearing will be held at a later date at Fort Bragg, Army officials said. Bergdahl is currently assigned to Joint Base San Antonio, Texas, with a desk job. General court-martial is the highest level of trial in the military justice system. If convicted, Bergdahl could face anywhere from life in prison to no confinement. Desertion can carry a death penalty, but Army officials have said that will not occur in Bergdahl's case. No U.S. service member has been executed for desertion since World War II. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl to face charges in court-martial Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl to face charges in court-martial Tribune wire reports A court-martial is the next step in the military's case against Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, who was held captive by the Taliban for five years and freed in a controversial exchange for five detainees in Guantanamo Bay. Bergdahl, 29, of Hailey, Idaho, walked off his post in eastern Afghanistan's Paktika... A court-martial is the next step in the military's case against Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, who was held captive by the Taliban for five years and freed in a controversial exchange for five detainees in Guantanamo Bay. Bergdahl, 29, of Hailey, Idaho, walked off his post in eastern Afghanistan's Paktika... Bergdahl as the case proceeds," Fidell said. Eugene Fidell, Bowe Bergdahl, Kenneth Dahl Eugene Fidell, Bowe Bergdahl, Kenneth Dahl Bowe Bergdahl, left, and defense lead counsel Eugene Fidell, center, look on as Maj. Bergdahl will be court-martialed, Friday, Sept. 18, 2015, at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. (AP Photo/Brigitte Woosley) Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, left, and defense lead counsel Eugene Fidell, center, look on as Maj. Bergdahl will be court-martialed, Friday, Sept. 18, 2015, at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. (AP Photo/Brigitte Woosley) (Brigitte Woosley / AP) Bergdahl left a tiny combat outpost June 29, 2009, just before midnight in an area in which the Taliban were known to operate. He wanted to cause a large enough crisis to get the attention of a general officer and relay concerns he had about his leaders, according to a senior officer who investigated his case, Lt. Gen. Kenneth Dahl, and Bergdahl in the recording released through "Serial. The designation is known as a DUSTWUN, an acronym short for "duty status-whereabouts unknown." Bergdahl was captured within hours, and moved within days over the border into Pakistan. His loss prompted a monthslong manhunt that ran American troops in the region ragged and spawned operations in which their lives were put in danger, Army officials allege. Bergdahl, meanwhile, was held by the Haqqani network, a group affiliated with the Taliban. He was moved several times over the next five years, tortured and kept primarily in the dark and isolated from other people. Bergdahl said on a "Serial" episode released last week that within 20 minutes of him leaving his base, Observation Post Mest-Malak, with plans to go to the larger Forward Operating Base Sharana, he had second thoughts. He realized he would face a "hurricane of wrath" from commanding officers, and deviated from his plan to find intelligence that he hoped would make the Army go easier on him, but got lost in some hills and captured by Taliban on motorcycles, he said. "Doing what I did is me saying that I am like, I don't know, Jason Bourne. . .. I had this fantastic idea that I was going to prove to the world that I was the real thing," Bergdahl said. "You know, that I could be what it is that all those guys out there that go to the movies and watch those movies, they all want to be that, but I wanted to prove that I was that." Dahl, the investigating officer of the case, said during the preliminary hearing in September that Bergdahl had outsize perceptions of his own ability as a soldier, and judged others unrealistically harshly. Thurman doesn't know what will happen during the coming proceedings but just wants to see Bergdahl punished. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif., whose office has closely tracked the case, questioned whether Bergdahl participating in the podcast may have forced the Army to seek the most serious form of trial. Republicans in the House Armed Services Committee accused the White House in a report released last week of having an ulterior motive in exchanging Bergdahl for Taliban officials: closing down the Guantanamo Bay prison. Bowe Bergdahl Donald Trump says Bowe Bergdahl should have been executed


theketchumkeystone.org [cached]

Bowe Bergdahl, who has been held prisoner in Afghanistan for the past five years.
Bergdahl, of Hailey, was freed and handed over to U.S. special forces on May 31 in exchange for five Taliban prisoners held at Guantanamo Bay. "We celebrate with Bowe, Bob and Jani Bergdahl today as this wonderful news brings an end to their five-year ordeal," said Idaho Senator Mike Crapo. "It is welcome news that Sergeant Bergdahl has been released," said Idaho Senator Jim Risch. "Bowe has been held for five years against his will by the Taliban and Haqqani network. I can only imagine the joy and relief that Bowe and his family are feeling at this moment." "I am thrilled that Bowe Bergdahl has been freed and will soon be reunited with his parents. "I couldn't be more pleased with the news of Bowe Bergdahl's release and the ending of a nearly five-year nightmare for Bowe and his parents, Bob and Jani Bergdahl," said Idaho Congressman Mike Simpson. "The prayers of people across Idaho and the nation have been answered and Bowe will soon be headed back to the town he calls home-Hailey, Idaho. We are all grateful for the tireless efforts of innumerable people within the Department of Defense and Department of State in securing Bowe's release and for the work of those who have been seeking Bowe's safe return for years." As the administrator for the BringBoweBack2014 website, I am going to set up a special page where a visitor can submit a 15 - 20 second video message right from their computer thanking the President for his tireless work to secure the freedom of Bowe Bergdahl.


townhall.com

Bowe Bergdahl To Be Charged With Desertion | Katie Pavlich
And about those thorny questions about the legality of this prisoner/hostage exchange ( click through for the reasons the administration is re-casting Bergdahl as the former), the White House is "apologizing" to some members of Congress for failing to alert them to the deal in advance, as mandated by law: The ostensibly imminent concerns about Bergdahl's health strikes even some reliable liberals as garbage. Bowe Bergdahl, who was released to American special forces in return for the freedom of five senior Taliban commanders. Bowe Bergdahl, the White House overrode an existing interagency process charged with debating the transfer of Guantanamo Bay prisoners and dismissed long-standing Pentagon and intelligence community concerns based on Top Secret intelligence about the dangers of releasing the five men, sources familiar with the debate tell TIME...officials in the Pentagon and intelligence communities had successfully fought off release of the five men in the past, officials tell Time. Buried lede: Obama wanted to release the Taliban 5 long before Bergdahl deserted and was captured. http://t.co/y0XjBwx0Nf Bowe Bergdahl


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